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Program Description

The Department of Marriage and Family Therapy is one of five academic units in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. The other units are the Departments of Child and Family Studies, Public Health, Food Studies and Nutrition, Sport Management, and the School of Social Work. The Department of Marriage and Family Therapy offers an M.A. and a Ph.D. program. Both programs are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (C.O.A.M.F.T.E.).

The Department provides academic and clinical training in marriage and family therapy theory. Both the M.A. and Ph.D. programs focus on the family as a system and the cultural and societal frameworks within which couples and families grow and develop. The Department’s emphasis is on training student therapists and scholars to challenge themselves through fostering relationships with others who hold various and diverse worldviews. By working towards the creation of an environment of respect, honesty, and integrity, the programs serve to increase cultural sensitivity, heighten students’ awareness of self in relation to others, and generate an understanding of the role played by context in issues presented in therapy.

Marriage and family therapy (M.F.T.) students gain hands-on experience in the Couple and Family Therapy Center. The in-house clinic is located at Peck Hall, 601 East Genesee Street in the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy. Established in 1989, it serves as a teaching and research center for M.F.T. master’s and doctoral students. All M.F.T. students are required to see clients at the in-house clinic and may not choose their client caseload based on race, class, gender, sexual orientation, religion, culture, age, or other difference/diversity category. Students utilize the center to gain clinical experience. Individual, group, couples and family therapy is offered to members of the Syracuse community under the supervision of the clinical faculty who operate from a family systems perspective. The Center is equipped for live and digitally recorded supervision.

Program Mission Statement

The Syracuse University M.F.T. program’s mission is to educate and train clinicians, scholars, and researchers in the ethical and systemic practice of M.F.T. with a commitment to diversity and inclusion.

SU MFT PhD Mission Statement

To prepare ethical clinical scholars who will advance theory, research, supervision, and/or teaching in the field of marriage and family therapy. 

History of the Marriage and Family Therapy Program

It has been over forty years since the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy was conceived by Bernice M. Wright, Dean of the College for Home Economics, Robert Pickett, Chair of the Department of Family Relations and Child Development, and Harvey Noordsy, Executive Director of the Onondaga Pastoral Counseling Center. The first students entered in 1969, and in 1970 the New York State Department of Education officially granted the Department the right to award an M.A. in Marriage and Family Counseling. The M.A. was initially a program within the Department of Child and Family Studies. Since that date, the Marriage and Family Therapy Program has graduated over 400 M.A. students. In December 1994, the department graduated its first doctoral student; 23 doctoral students have completed their degree programs in the last 5 years.

Initially, the M.A. program was a 30-credit degree, intended primarily for persons in the process of mid-life career change, and ministers wishing to augment their pastoral counseling skills. Students met with clinical pastoral students at the Onondaga Pastoral Counseling Center for their first-year core courses, and their practicum placements were at that Center and at the marriage and family therapy counseling offices, initially housed with the rest of the Department at 744 Ostrom Avenue and later at 100 Walnut Place. In 1983 the M.F.T. Program moved to new facilities, consisting of two faculty offices and four small clinic rooms equipped for live supervision.

In 1986, the clinic was expanded by adding another therapy room, enlarging two existing rooms, and increasing opportunities for live and videotape supervision. In fall 1989, the department was granted the use of two adjacent offices and, with the help of a grant from Diana and Stephen A. Goldberg, was completely refurbished. In February 1990, it was officially named the Goldberg Marriage and Family Therapy Center, with dedication ceremonies held in conjunction with the first annual conference of the newly formed Central New York Chapter of N.Y.A.M.F.T. In summer 1993, the Center was further expanded and entirely rebuilt to become a “state of the art” training and research center, completely computerized for easy storage of and access to clinic data. It consisted of a reception area, student space, graduate assistant office, assessment office, video equipment room, large-group observation room, two administrative offices, and six therapy rooms, all equipped for live and videotape supervision. In spring, 1999, the name was changed to the Goldberg Couple and Family Therapy Center, to more accurately represent the types of services provided. In January 2006 the M.F.T. Department relocated to the old School of Nursing at 426 Ostrom Ave. (corner of Marshall St.) in a newly remodeled area. The first floor housed the center with 5 therapy rooms, an assessment room, video room, student room, reception area and the center director’s office. All of the therapy rooms had an observation room. The classroom, another student room and all the faculty offices were located on the second floor.

In 2010 the department moved from the 2,400 square foot site on campus to a newly renovated 5,500 square foot facility on James Street. The James Street facility had expanded office space, clinic space, student areas, and a larger classroom. Most recently, in January 2013, the M.F.T. Department moved to its current location at 601 East Genesee Street. The department now is housed in a 30,000 square foot facility that has been completely renovated and updated and which has a 15 year lease to provide a more permanent home. The E. Genesee Street facility has a greatly expanded clinic area (14 counseling offices), three classrooms, a large computer lab, an entire floor for student areas (lounge, kitchen, locker room, etc.) and one floor for a community agency to occupy as a partner in clinical training for second-year students.

Like its facilities, the academic program has also grown dramatically. In October 1972, it was granted provisional accreditation by the American Association for Marriage and Family Counseling. In April 1975, the department became the first program to receive full accreditation by the C.O.A.M.F.C.E. (now C.O.A.M.F.T.E.-Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education) and soon after became a 36-credit hour program. Accreditation was renewed in 1981 and the program became a 45-credit hour program. In February l984, the Program’s accreditation was revoked temporarily but reinstated in 1986. The University approved a revised curriculum in 1985 and the State Education Department approved a change in program name to Marriage and Family Therapy. In l988, the Human Sexuality Program, a treatment and training program in sex therapy, was instituted with joint sponsorship by the College for Human Development and the Department of Family Medicine, SUNY Health Science Center. A second joint program, the Family Medicine/Family Therapy Program, was instituted in 1989. In 2010 the State Education Department of New York approved our request to change the degree program to a 60-credit degree. This change was initiated to meet the national trend toward requiring up to 60-credit degrees for licensure. In 1991 and again in 1996, 2001, 2007, and 2014 the M.A. program was reaccredited by the C.O.A.M.F.T.E.

In 1990, the College approved a proposal for a M.F.T. doctoral program and, in 1991 the University Senate approved the program. In 1992, the University was granted permission by the New York State Department of Education to award the doctoral degree in marriage and family therapy and the doctoral program was granted Candidacy Status by the C.O.A.M.F.T.E., receiving full accreditation in 1996. It was reaccredited in 2001, 2007 and 2015. It was the first M.F.T. doctoral program in New York State and one of two M.F.T. doctoral programs in the northeast. It remains one of the few doctoral programs accredited by the C.O.A.M.F.T.E. that is not located at large land- grant state universities.

The growth of the Program reflects the quality of its faculty, staff, and students. Six persons have served as Program Director: Sol Gordon from 1970 - 1976; Charlotte Kahn from 1976 - 1984; Eleanor Macklin from 1984 to 1998 (with the exception of 1992-93); Linda Stone Fish from 1992-1993, and 1998 to 2001. From 2001-2003, Linda Stone Fish served as the first Department Chair in the newly formed Department of Marriage and Family Therapy, within the College of Human Services and Health Professions (now the Falk College). Jonathan Sandberg began his service as Department Chair in 2003; Thom deLara became chair in 2007. Dr. Macklin joined the Program in 1982 and Dr. Stone Fish in 1985. In 1987, Phyllis Blumberg resigned as Associate Dean of the College to become a full-time M.F.T. faculty member until her retirement from teaching duties in 1991. In 1990, Dean Busby and Kenneth Hardy joined the M.F.T. faculty, with Dr. Hardy appointed Director of Clinical Training and Research. From 1995-96, Dr. Hardy served as Chair of the Department of Child and Family Studies and Dr. Busby served as Director of Clinical Training and Research. Dr. Stone Fish assumed responsibility for coordination of doctoral internships. In summer 1996, Dr. Anne Gosling became Director of Clinical Training, while Dr. Busby remained as Director of Clinical Research. In 1998, Dr. Macklin retired and Dr. Stone Fish began her service as Program Director. Jonathan Sandberg joined the faculty. Dr. Sandberg became Director of Clinical Research in the summer of 1999.

In 2007 Thom deLara became Department Chair. In 2012 Dr. Stone Fish was named the Falk Family Endowed Professor of Family Therapy and assumed the role of Graduate Director for the department. Dr. Tracey Reichert Schimpff currently serves as the Director of Clinical Services. Dr. Dyane Watson is the Assistant Program Director and a full-time member of the faculty, Dr. Rashmi Gangamma and Dr. Deborah Coolhart are associate faculty members. Lisa Tedeschi is the Internship Coordinator. Daran Shipman is a part-time clinical supervisor. Beth Ciciarelli is the administrative assistant for the department and Anne Metzger-Wormuth is the office coordinator for the Couple and Family Therapy Center.

Master’s Program Educational Outcomes

The S.U. M.A. M.F.T. program goals are informed by the Professional Marriage and Family Therapy Principles (P.M.F.T.P.s), which include:

  • A.A.M.F.T. Code of Ethics (2015);
  • M.F.T. Core Competencies;
  • A.M.F.T.R.B. Examination Domains, Task Statements, and Knowledge Statements;
  • Requirements for Licensure for Marriage and Family Therapists in the State of New York.

Goals, Outcomes, Targets and Benchmarks: Consistent with our Mission Statement, our program goals, student learning outcomes (S.L.O.s), and associated targets and benchmarks are as follow:

Program Goal #1 (Self-in-Systems): To train family systems professionals who are informed by a Self-in-Systems perspective.

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate awareness and regulation of self in system.

Benchmark 1.1:  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Clinical Readiness Interview Rubric (specifically 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, and 2c).

Benchmark 1.2:  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically questions 4a, 4b, 4g, 4i, 6a, 6b, 6c, and 6d, which are associated with awareness and regulation of self in systems).

Program Goal #2 (Diversity): To prepare family systems professionals who are sensitive to and engaged with social justice issues.

S.L.O.#2. Students will demonstrate engagement with cultural and contextual differences.

Benchmark 2.1:  At least 70% of students will receive a B or better on the final project in M.F.T. 684.

Benchmark 2.2:  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically questions 4b, 4g, 6b and 6d which are associated with cultural and contextual engagement).

Program Goal #3: To prepare family systems professionals who are competent systems clinicians able to provide services across a variety of contexts.

S.L.O.#3: Students will demonstrate M.F.T. clinical competency skills across a variety of contexts.

Benchmark 3.1:  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically questions 1a-f, 2a-e, 3a-d, 4c-f, and 4h, which are associated with clinical competency skills and assessed every semester).

Program Goal #4 (Ethics): To prepare family systems professionals with knowledge and skills for M.F.T. legal and ethical analysis and decision-making.

S.L.O.#4:  Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. legal and ethical guidelines and professional standards.

Benchmark 4.1:  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically questions 5a-d, which are associated with legal and ethical competency).

Benchmark 4.2:  At least 70% of students will receive a B or better on the final project in M.F.T. 681 (Ethics- Personal and Professional Integration Paper).

Program Goal #5 (Knowledge and Research): To prepare family systems professionals with an educational foundation grounded in family systems theory and research-informed practice).

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. historical, current, and research-informed theoretical information.

Benchmark 5.1: At least 70% of students will receive a B or higher rating two family systems theory course exams (M.F.T. 671 and M.F.T. 682).

Benchmark 5.2: At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically 1a and 4a), assessed at the end of each semester that the student is clinically active.

Doctoral Program Educational Outcomes

The Program Goals are informed by the Professional Marriage and Family Therapy Principles (PMFTPs), which include:

Consistent with our Mission Statement, our program goals, student learning outcomes (SLOs), and associated targets and benchmarks are as follow:

Program Goal #1: To prepare MFT scholars to advance systemic theory knowledge.

SLO#1:  Students will demonstrate competence in advanced theory and theory building as evidenced by:

Benchmark 1.1:  At least 80% of students will pass their qualifying examination which articulates their theory of therapy.

Benchmark 1.2:  At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the MFT 861 assignment in which they articulate their philosophy of supervision.

Benchmark 1.3:  At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the MFT 865 assignment related to theory development.

Program Goal #2: To train MFT scholars prepared to advance systemic and relational research.

SLO#2:  Students will demonstrate research competence as evidenced by: 

Benchmark 2.1: At least 80% of students will pass the research portion of the qualifying examination.

Benchmark 2.2: At least 80% of students will demonstrate skills of ethical research and cultural sensitivity consistent with the Code of Ethics of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy as evident by completion of the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) training before dissertation proposal approval.

Benchmark 2.3: At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the MFT 882 Evaluative Assignment.

Program Goal #3: To provide students the foundation for becoming an AAMFT Approved Supervisor.

SLO#3 Students will demonstrate supervisory competence as evidenced by:

Benchmark 3.1:  At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in MFT 861 (Supervision of Therapy) course.

Benchmark 3.2:  At least 80% of students will maintain an AAMFT membership. 

Program Goal #4: To train MFT scholars prepared to teach systemic and relational curricula.

SLO#4:  Students will demonstrate professional teaching competence as evidenced by at least one of the following:

Benchmark 4.1:  At least 80% of students will pass the oral examination of their qualifying exam which assesses their ability to teach theoretical constructs.

Benchmark 4.2:  At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in the teaching assignment for MFT 865.

Benchmark 4.3:  At least 80% of students will be the presenter for at least one poster, paper, and/or workshop at a professional meeting while in residence.

Program Goal #5: To train ethical therapists with advanced relational and systemic clinical skills.

SLO#5:  Students will demonstrate clinical competence as evidenced by:

Benchmark 5.1:  At least 80% of students will complete 1,000 clinical hours with 200 hours of supervision by an AAMFT Approved Supervisor or equivalent by graduation.

Benchmark 5.2:  At least 80% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by supervisor.

Benchmark 5.3:  Students will demonstrate skills of ethical practice and cultural sensitivity consistent with the Code of Ethics of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy as evidenced by at least 80% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (specifically 4a, 4b, 4g, 4i, 5a-d 6a, 6b, 6c, and 6d).

Program Goal #6: To prepare systemic scholars who are sensitive to social justice and diversity.

SLO#6: Students will demonstrate awareness and engagement with cultural and contextual difference:

Benchmark 6.1:  At least 80% of students will pass the cultural awareness portion of the qualifying examination.

Benchmark 6.2:  At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in the Cultural Diversity assignment (Special Topic) for MFT 875.

Policies and Procedures, and Educational Outcomes Review

Syracuse University Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy Statement

Syracuse University's Marriage and Family Therapy department follows the Syracuse University Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy Statement. Syracuse University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action institution. The M.F.T. department prohibits discrimination and harassment based on race, color, creed, religion, health, socioeconomic status, sex, gender, national origin, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, genetic information, veteran status, or any other status protected by applicable law to the extent prohibited by law. This nondiscrimination policy covers recruitment, admissions, codes of conduct, hiring, retention or dismissal of faculty, students, and supervisors, and access to and treatment in University programs, services, and activities.


Additionally, M.F.T. faculty and staff adhere to and prepare students to value the creation of socially-just, anti-racist, L.G.B.T.Q.-Affirmative and anti-discriminatory environments. Students are expected to engage in cultural humility, awareness of self in relation to others, and an understanding of psychosocial and cultural contexts of issues presented in clinical practice and research. We believe that valuing each other's similarities and differences helps us to deepen our understanding of relationships in systems. Students are required to see clients with diverse backgrounds/experiences and may not choose their caseloads based on race, class, gender/gender expression, sexual orientation, religion, culture, age, health, socio-economic status, or other diversity category.

Syracuse University’s Office of Disability Services

Syracuse University and the Marriage and Family Therapy department are committed to student success and to supporting Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This means that in general no individual who is otherwise qualified shall be excluded from participation in, be denied benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any program or activity, solely by reason of having a disability. If a student believes that they need accommodations for a disability, they should contact the Office of Disability Services(O.D.S.), located in Room 309 of 804 University Avenue, or call (315) 443-4498 for an appointment to discuss their needs and the process for requesting accommodations. O.D.S. is responsible for coordinating disability-related accommodations and will issue students with documented Disabilities Accommodation Authorization Letters, as appropriate. Since accommodations may require early planning and generally are not provided retroactively, please contact O.D.S. as soon as possible.

If a student has an authorized disability-related accommodations students should provide their instructors with a current Accommodation Authorization Letter from O.D.S. and review those accommodations with them at the beginning of each semester.

Admission Procedures

Applicants to graduate programs in the Falk College must hold or expect to receive a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university, prior to the start of the intended enrollment term. Admission decisions are determined by a committee of M.F.T. faculty evaluating applications carefully, considering all materials submitted, and then selecting the best-qualified candidates. (How to Apply).

Recruitment Policy

Syracuse University M.F.T. adheres to the university anti-discrimination policy regarding recruitment and admissions. As described in the Syracuse University Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy Statement: "Syracuse University is an equal-opportunity, affirmative-action institution". The M.F.T. department prohibits discrimination and harassment based on race, color, creed, religion, health, socioeconomic status, sex, gender, national origin, citizenship, ethnicity, marital status, age, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity and gender expression, genetic information, veteran status, or any other status protected by applicable law to the extent prohibited by law. This nondiscrimination policy covers recruitment, admissions, employment, and access to and treatment in University programs, services, and activities.

Students are recruited from across the United States and the world.  University and program websites provide information to potential applicants.  The Falk College Admissions Department travels throughout the US and attends annual conferences, such as AAMFT and NCFR, to promote the program.  Faculty also attend professional conferences and events for the program to meet with potential scholars. Lastly, staff, students, and alumni informally refer others to the program.

Masters Admissions Policy

Enrollment in the M.F.T. master’s program is limited, and admission decisions are made in March of each year for the following Fall. Spring and Summer admissions will be accepted as space is available. All applicants should submit the following to the Graduate School by March 15th.  M.F.T. application requirements include a completed bachelor’s degree, recent G.R.E. scores, 3 letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. There is no minimum G.P.A. required for admission, although the M.F.T. Department uses a benchmark of 3.4 as a standard. (See How to Apply  for a list and description of required application materials).


PhD Admissions Policy

The deadline for all applications will be December 15th for the following fall semester.

We only accept students once a year and the deadline is strict (not rolling). Once applications are complete (on-line Ph.D. application, or for internal admits, internal transfer  form; G.R.E. scores; T.O.E.F.L. scores, or their equivalent for international students; personal essay; transcripts from all previous academic work; video interview questions listed on CollegeNet application which are required, not optional; and three letters of recommendation). Students will be notified if they will be interviewed and the date and time of the interviews. Interviews will be group and individual and it is the responsibility of the applicant to pay for all expenses.

Internal candidates: Syracuse University students (those in our department and other departments of the university) or those who have graduated from Syracuse University within 12 months of the time they are applying to the doctoral program, are considered internal admits by the University. Internal admit students who wish to be considered for the doctoral program must complete a request for internal transfer (see M.F.T. Administrative Assistant for form), G.R.E.s, (T.O.E.F.L. scores, or their equivalent for international students) personal essay, transcripts from all previous academic work, video  interviews (unless you are in the S.U. M.F.T. Department), three letters of recommendation (not from current S.U. M.F.T. faculty who are on the M.F.T. Doctoral Admissions Committee) by December 15th of the year in which they wish to apply. Once applications are complete, internal admits will be notified about the interview in the same way as external candidates.

Before applying to the doctoral program, please review the following statement: All doctoral students in M.F.T. must complete the requirements for the M.A. in M.F.T. as well as the requirements for the Ph.D. If during the admissions review process it is found a student lacks certain content areas that may not be fully satisfied by the doctoral program (such as ethics), those students would be required to complete additional coursework above and beyond their master’s coursework.

Students admitted to the M.F.T. Program may seek financial support outside of the department through merit-based awards, such as University Fellowships, College scholarships, and a variety of academic and student-service assistantships, or through need-based financial aid, including loans and the College Work Study Program. If interested in financial assistance, students should indicate this on the application form and at time of the admissions interview.

Persons interested in more information about the Department should contact Thom deLara, Department Chair, Peck Hall, 601 East Genesee Street, Syracuse, New York 13202, email:  tdelara@syr.edu, or Beth Ciciarelli, Administrative Assistant, 315-443-9329, email: bdbagozz@syr.edu.   Those interested in the doctoral program should contact Linda Stone Fish, Graduate Director, email: flstone@syr.edu .  All potential applicants who wish to speak with a representative of the Department or to visit the Department prior to their application are invited to call Beth Ciciarelli at 315-443-9329 or email: bdbagozz@syr.edu.


Authenticity of Student Work

Syracuse University sets high standards for academic integrity and authenticity of student work. Those standards are supported and enforced by students, including those who serve as academic integrity hearing panel members and hearing officers. The presumptive sanction for a first offense is course failure, accompanied by the transcript notation “Violation of the Academic Integrity Policy.” The standard sanction for a first offense by graduate students is suspension or expulsion. Students should review academic integrity expectations online at and confer with instructors about course-specific citation methods, permitted collaboration (if any), and rules for examinations. The Syracuse University Academic Integrity Policy also governs the veracity of signatures on attendance sheets and other verification of participation in class activities. Plagiarism or cheating on any assignment will result in an F in the course. Instructors may elect to use Turnitin to screen student work for authenticity.

Grading and Assessment

The M.F.T. program follows Syracuse University Policy on grades.

All faculty will clarify grading procedures and rubrics within course syllabi. There is a minimum grade requirement of B- in all M.F.T. courses. All courses are included in calculating the overall grade point average. Students are expected to maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 to remain in good standing with the program.

Students are also assessed for clinical competency at several points in the program. These include clinical readiness as well as end of semester evaluations in Practicum.

Please see Criteria for Clinical Readiness for the grading rubric (Appendix B).

See also Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Student (Appendix F).

Codes of Conduct and Criteria for Good Standing

The Marriage and Family Therapy program has high expectations for student performance, both academically and clinically. The program adheres to expectations set forth by Syracuse University with regard to student conduct.

In addition, the M.F.T. program expects that students are aware of and capable of functioning within the ethical and professional standards of the profession.

Criteria for good standing includes the following academic, clinical, professional, and behavioral standards:

  1. Earn a B- or better in all M.F.T. courses (and courses affiliated with Certificates of Advanced Study) and maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better for all courses listed on the Program of Study;
  2. Conduct self in a manner consistent with standards established in the A.A.M.F.T. Code of Ethics;
  3. Refrain from behavior determined by the faculty to be detrimental to self or others (clients, classmates, university employees, etc.);
  4. Register for M.F.T. Practicum each semester and continue seeing clients until 500 client contact hours are completed, or, after matriculation as a Ph.D. student, register for M.F.T. 860 and continue being clinically active until completion of coursework and the qualifying examination;
  5. While registered for M.F.T. Practicum, 860, and 960, maintain appropriate client and supervision hours and submit necessary paperwork documenting these hours;
  6. Receive satisfactory end-of-term supervisor reports;
  7. Maintain registration by registering for course work or for G.R.D. 998, Degree in Progress, 0 credits, every semester until date of degree;
  8. If you are enrolled in the C.A.S. in Trauma-Informed Practice, earn a B- or better in all core courses and maintain a G.P.A. of 3.0 or better for all elective courses;
  9. If doctoral student, show continual progress toward completion of coursework, qualifying examination, internship, dissertation proposal, and dissertation;
  10. Doctoral students who have completed coursework and not yet defended their qualifying exams or dissertation must meet with the faculty once a year to demonstrate “continual progress toward completion” of program requirements.

Students whose progress is deemed unsatisfactory will be placed on unofficial probation. Students who remain on unofficial probation for more than one semester will be asked to leave the program.

Students who take courses in the Graduate School prior to enrolling in the M.F.T. core courses may not begin the M.F.T. core courses if they (a) have a G.P.A. of less than 3.0 or (b) carry any incomplete(s) for course(s) being counted toward the degree. Students who have been admitted to the Department but do not matriculate the following Fall must either defer their application or re-apply for admission.

All requirements for the M.A. degree must be completed within a period of five years from the date the student registers for the first course to be used in their M.F.T. M.A. program of study. If the degree is not obtained within this period, the student may petition the M.F.T. faculty and the Graduate School for an extension of time or for reinstatement of credit in an outdated course, stating rationale for currency of knowledge in the particular content. A candidate for the doctorate is expected to complete the dissertation within five years after passing the qualifying examination or must similarly petition the Graduate School for extension of time. Justification for such extension must include evidence that the student is maintaining current knowledge in the field. A student who fails to receive such an extension will be required to repeat the qualifying examination.

Students who must leave the University for personal or health reasons before completing degree requirements should file an Official Leave of Absence form, whether or not they intend to return. Students who are suspended from the University for academic or disciplinary reasons will be officially withdrawn by the Graduate School at the recommendation of the Program faculty. Refer to the Syracuse University Academic Rules and Regulations for further details about procedures and implications.

Retention

The M.A. in M.F.T. program at Syracuse University advances the success and retention of students in ways that are consistent with the program’s mission, goals, student learning outcomes, and anti-discrimination policy. Retention efforts are structured into the program as supports for student success and include but are not limited to orientation, regular advising opportunities, field liaising, clinical/supervision documentation, feedback opportunities (both to and from students), forums, student support meetings, and remediation plans.

The following areas outline our retention efforts:

Orientation

Orientation is a mandatory event undertaken at the beginning of a student’s program that provides an opportunity to meet with faculty and other students of the program and gain information about expectation, policies and processes.

Student Academic Advising and Program of Study

Academic advisors work with students to provide academic guidance throughout the program. Students are encouraged to meet each semester to review their Program of Study and address any concerns that may affect their ability to complete the program. Students needing additional support may meet with their academic advisor more frequently, have their Program of Study revised and/or be given referrals for additional resources to assist with their success in the program.

Field Liaising

Master’s student engagement with field placement is supported through pre-placement meetings and site visit meetings. Site visits are scheduled for each semester that a student is in placement. Students needing additional support are provided opportunities for additional meetings and additional supports. PhD students work with their advisor to identify field placement opportunities depending on their clinical and research goals. Students are responsible for making sure sites meet state requirements for licensure.

Clinical and Supervision Documentation

Students are required to log and turn in their clinical and supervision hours monthly. The department tracks hours and assists students in monitoring their progress toward completion of the clinical requirements for graduation. The Internship Placement Coordinator and advisors assist MA students in using this feedback to modify plans as necessary.

Mentoring

Doctoral students begin working with an assigned faculty mentor when they start their PhD program.  Mentors meet regularly with students to identify their areas of interest, connect them to scholarly tasks and activities, and support their professional development. At the end of their course work, students are encouraged to identify an advisor to guide their internship and dissertation research. Students may choose to work with their initially assigned mentor or request to work with another faculty member.


Annual Review

Doctoral students meet annually with program faculty to review and discuss their progress in and potential challenges of their program.  The meeting focuses on student goals and provides an opportunity for feedback. Annual review forms are distributed by the program director.

Feedback Opportunities

Opportunities to receive feedback regarding academic and clinic progress and development are implemented throughout a student’s program. Formal feedback regarding clinical performance occurs in practicum meetings and annual review meetings. Meetings with assigned advisors are also opportunities to provide and receive feedback.   Master’s students participate in the Clinical Readiness Interview at the end of the first semester of Practicum and continue to receive feedback through supervisor evaluations each semester that they are clinically active. The PhD program, including faculty and students, also meet regularly (1-2 times a semester) to identify challenges and opportunities for program growth. Additionally, students are encouraged to provide feedback to the department regarding expectations, sufficiency and climate through formal (surveys) and informal (focus groups and forums) means.

Student Support Meeting and Remediation Plans

We strive to provide students with a clear indication of their development and competence in all areas of the program. In the event that a student does not pass the clinical readiness interview or is at risk of not meeting criteria for good standing in the department (See Criteria for Good Standing in the Department Section), a meeting will be conducted as needed based on faculty evaluation and recommendation. In this meeting, an assessment of the student’s academic and clinical functioning will be made. An individualized remediation plan will be developed with the student to assist with passing the required program milestones and successfully completing the program. A follow-up meeting will also be scheduled to monitor the student’s growth in these areas and progress in the program. Where students are unable to resolve the problematic issue, they may be counseled out or dismissed from the program. (See Remediation Policy and Dismissal policy for further details).

Remediation

The Syracuse University’s Marriage and Family Therapy program has high expectations for student performance. (See Criteria for Good Standing). In addition, the program works in many ways to support student success. (See Retention Efforts).

In the event that a student is found to be not in good standing, a meeting will be held with the student to discuss the performance issue and develop a corrective course of action plan. The plan may include meetings with program administrators, faculty, and/or clinical staff.

If such assistance does not result in improved performance to an acceptable level, the student can be dismissed from the program.

A record of unacceptable academic and/or clinical performance will be maintained in the student’s record in the department office.

Dismissal

A student may be dismissed from the program and the University for reasons of academic or clinical performance, clinical or personal misconduct, or violation(s) of the Syracuse University Academic Integrity Policy or the Student Code of Conduct.

Examples of misconduct that may warrant dismissal include, but are not limited to, hostile actions, actions that are harmful, and unethical or unsafe behavior.

Confidentiality and Privacy

Syracuse University is committed to the protection and confidentiality of student educational records, adhering closely to the guidelines established by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (F.E.R.P.A.) a federal legislation established to regulate access and maintenance of student educational records. F.E.R.P.A. affords student certain rights with respect to their education records, including the right to inspect their education records, request an amendment of the records that the student believes are inaccurate, and the right to control disclosures of their records except to the extent that F.E.R.P.A. authorizes disclosure without consent. (It is important to note that all rights to access move to the student when that student is in a post-secondary education institution; parents, spouses, and significant others have no inherent right to access to student educational records.) Educational records for the most part include, with certain exceptions, all records maintained in any medium, which can identify the student.

Complaints and Grievances

The Syracuse University Marriage and Family Therapy program encourages student feedback and works with students to resolve program related concerns. Students may communicate with appropriate faculty, staff, and/or the Department Chair to address any concerns.

If a student believes that faculty or staff have treated them unfairly or inappropriately or believes that complaints have not been addressed, the student should state this in writing and/or request to meet with the faculty, staff, and Department Chair. If this informal procedure is still unsatisfactory, the student may begin formal procedures.

In the event of a formal student complaint or grievance, the program follows Syracuse University and Falk College Grievance policy and procedures.

For information about Falk College policies and procedures around student grievances.

Distance Learning Complaint Process for Out-of-State Students

Syracuse University’s degree and certificate programs delivered through distance education are registered with the New York State Education Department (N.Y.S.E.D.).

The State Authorization Reciprocity Agreement (S.A.R.A.) is a national initiative to provide more access to online courses while maintaining compliance standards with state regulatory agencies. S.A.R.A. allows institutions to provide online courses outside of their own state borders by seeking and maintaining state approvals via a streamlined process. To learn more about S.A.R.A. New York State joined S.A.R.A. on December 9, 2016. On February 15, 2017, the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (N.C.-S.A.R.A.) approved institutional participation for Syracuse University.

Syracuse University is licensed by the District of Columbia Higher Education Licensure Commission to offer courses and instruction, including distance education, leading to the award of certificates, diplomas, or degrees. The University is not required to be authorized in the three non-S.A.R.A. states (California, Florida, and Massachusetts).

Students residing in other states while enrolled in a course offered by Syracuse University are encouraged to utilize Syracuse University’s internal complaint or review policies and procedures, typically initiated within the academic department, prior to filing a complaint with their state agency or agencies. See “Distance Learning” for additional information.

However, if the complaint is not resolved through these processes, students may use the following list (current as of June 2017) to identify the office(s) to which complaints may be directed in the state in which they reside.

If a complaint is not resolved satisfactorily within the University, then students may also file a complaint with the New York State Education Department (N.Y.S.E.D.) which oversees higher education in New York State and/or with the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, the University’s accrediting agency. See “Student Grievance Process” for additional information.

Research Opportunities

The M.F.T. Department has ongoing data collection at the Couple and Family Therapy Center that informs clinical practice and research. M.F.T. masters and doctoral students may contact their advisors for further information on gaining research experience using this dataset.

Use of Clinical Data

Students from the M.F.T. Department are welcome to use clinical data for purposes of publications, conference presentations, thesis, or other research projects. A faculty member will serve as a mentor on every student project using clinic data and must be included in any resulting publications and presentations.

Students who have graduated from the program and wish to continue to work on their thesis or research using this dataset may do so under the advisement of M.F.T. faculty.

Student Participation in Department Governance

Students have the opportunity to provide direct feedback to the department regarding the needs of their cohort through participation on department committees and through representation at M.F.T. Faculty/Department meetings. Student representatives sit on the M.F.T. Research Committee, the M.F.T. Curriculum Committee and the M.F.T. Technology Committee. M.F.T. Department meetings will include all faculty and staff, and one student representative from each cohort (first-year and second-year classes). A student representative will be appointed to the Promotion and Tenure Committee at the discretion of the committee chair. Student representatives to M.F.T. Department committees may be from any cohort and may include part-time students. Department meetings are held monthly throughout the academic year (August, September, October, November, December (if necessary) and January, February, March, and April. Department meetings during the summer sessions are held on an ad hoc basis.

Additionally, the department surveys first-year students in the fall semester, in regards to the admissions and orientation process, and surveys second-year students in the spring semester to determine overall satisfaction with the M.F.T. department. This is supplemented by the Program Director meeting with all students in the department, in small groups, for an informal lunch discussion about their issues and concerns about the department. These meetings take place on an annual basis. Students can contact the Department Chair to indicate interest in serving on a committee or as representatives to department meetings.

Program Evaluation Policy

As a part of our program evaluation and improvement plan, the Syracuse University Marriage and Family Therapy Department engages in a continuous and ongoing cycle of assessment. As part of this cycle, our educational outcomes, and policies and procedures are formally reviewed during biannual faculty meetings (April and December) (see Appendices C and D for Masters and Doctoral Evaluation Timelines). These reviews are used to: (a) evaluate the professional marriage and family therapy principles on which the outcomes and policies are based, (b) review feedback/data related to the educational outcomes and policies and procedures from the programs’ communities of interest (e.g., faculty, students, graduates, employers), and (c) make decisions leading to program improvement.

Student Information Policy

The Syracuse University Marriage and Family Therapy program collects data on each Student Outcome annually. Graduating students are asked to provide contact information (email, phone, etc.) when they graduate so they and/or their employers can be contacted post-graduation.

Graduated students are asked to participate in an alumni survey which will be mailed or emailed to them one year after graduation. The purpose of the survey is to gather information about alumni professional activities and employment post-graduation. As part of the alumni survey, graduates are asked to provide their current employer’s contact information and consent for their employer to be contacted to participate in a confidential employer evaluation survey. The purpose of the employer evaluation survey is to gather information about how well our graduates are doing, and how satisfied they are with the graduate’s performance to help us improve our program. Information about student achievement. Faculty members or supervisors may talk about individual students in order to enhance student learning and assist in their clinical training. Our hope is to be as supportive as possible and utilize the multiple resources that could benefit a student’s development during their time in the program. If faculty or supervisors have serious concerns about a student’s performance, they will address those issues directly with the student.

Portability of Degree

The M.F.T. program pays attention to national trends for marriage and family therapy credentialing and reviews program standards to maximize potential for degree portability. Students will graduate meeting core standards that prepare them for next steps toward licensure in their desired post-graduate states and territories. The M.F.T. Master of Arts degree from Syracuse University is designed to provide a minimum 60 credits of M.F.T. education, 500 clinical hours of face to face experience with clients based on A.A.M.F.T. Core Competencies and 100 hours of M.F.T. supervision that will prepare graduates to apply for a post-graduate limited permit in the state of New York as a first step toward New York licensure. The PhD degree requires 72 credits of education, 1000 hours of face to face client experience, and 200 hours of supervision. Applicants who are interested in becoming licensed in other states must review the state requirements for licensure from the M.F.T. state licensing boards in that state. International students will need to review requirements set by their territorial credentialing bodies. Students are encouraged to review these standards early in their education process.

Technology Requirements

Students will need to have access to a computer and printer, as well as internet access to log in to their Syracuse University email, and Blackboard accounts. To access assistance for any technical issues logging into or navigating Blackboard, contact the I.T.S. Service Centers at: email I.T. or 315.443.2677. For Available Hours.

The following standards are minimum requirements to participate in courses at S.U.:

  1. P.C. or Macintosh computer with 4 gigabytes of RAM;
  2. Minimum of 10 gigabytes of available disk space;
  3. Sound card with speakers or headphones;
  4. Microsoft Office or OpenOffice;
  5. Internet Access – broadband (Cable, D.S.L., or FIOS);
  6. A supported web browser. For complete list, visit S.U. Answers;
  7. Plugins – Adobe Acrobat Reader, Adobe Flash Player, Java.

Students are expected to follow M.F.T. program policies regarding use of confidentiality compliant platforms for all client related technology use.

See Code of Conduct section of Program Handbook.

Technical Training.

The M.F.T. program and Syracuse University have the following training and resources in place for students, faculty, staff and supervisors:

  • Titanium Manual – guides students, faculty, staff and supervisors in the use of the Titanium client record-keeping and research database system.
  • Office Coordinator – serves as a training and technical assistance resource for students, faculty, staff and supervisors using the Titanium client record-keeping and research database system.
  • Falk College and University trainings and technical assistance guide teaching faculty and program staff concerning the creation and use of A.D.A. compliant materials.
  • Falk College M.F.T. has a designated librarian who can help students locate materials and design research.
  • The Writing Center supports the quality of student academic work.
  • Falk College Career Services provides support and training for student career preparation, including resume writing and job search.
  • The Slutzker Center for International Services supports international students in navigating VISA requirements and transition to and from the U.S.
  • Syracuse University Information Technology Services (I.T.S.) provides a broad range of tech support to students and university employees Includes self-help and live support for devices, instructional platforms like Blackboard and Google, and course development strategies.

Syracuse University Academic Resources and Student Support Services.

As part of the broader Syracuse University community, our students have access to the abundant academic and student support services Syracuse University has to offer.  Following is a list of some of the services Syracuse University makes available to students:

Center for Learning and Student Success (CLASS) provides and facilitates academic support services, including one-on-one tutoring, small-group tutoring and workshops, academic integrity education and training.

Fellowship and Scholarship Advising assists in identify fellowship and scholarship opportunities and assist in the application process.

Information Technology Services  provides services, training, applications and infrastructure to support your technology needs as a student, teacher, and researcher.

The Syracuse University Library provides faculty and students with access to books, maps, video, and other physical collections and exhibits and special collections-as well as access to 25,000 subscription online journals, databases, videos and e-books.  Online resources are available through a proxy when individuals are off campus, and the library provides delivery and pick-up services for physical resources for faculty.

Subject-Area Librarians specialists knowledgeable in the most useful library tools and holdings for a specific field of study.

The Writing Center  provides help with a wide range of writing projects, including academic assignments, internship applications and professional portfolios.

The Graduate Editing Center provides free editing and proofreading services from your lengthy graduate research to brief subject papers.

Center for Disability Resources (CDR) arranges for the provision of auxiliary aids, assistive technology, and reasonable accommodations for all qualified students with documented disabilities.

Accessible Syracuse  varied services not only accommodate individuals with disabilities, but also recognize their potential to excel in both educational and career opportunities at Syracuse.

The Barnes Center at the Arch state-of-the-art health, wellness and recreation complex providing medical, psychiatric, sexual, and substance use health services, counseling, emergency services, health insurance, pharmacy, sexual and a relationship violence response team. The Barnes Center offers student counseling services.

The Office of Financial Aid & Scholarship Programs helps students navigate the financial aid process.

Office of Financial Literacy provides financial education and promotes positive money management for all students.

Department of Public Safety works to maintain a safe, secure learning and living environment on the Syracuse University campus and in the surrounding campus areas.

Graduate Student Organization (GSO) a student representative body that advocates for graduate students concerns across the campus.

Career Services helps students explore options, build skills, make connections, and can assist them throughout your college career and beyond.

Graduate School Professional and Career Development supports students at every stage of graduate or postdoctoral program with workshops, hands-on labs and individual appointments.

Teaching Assistant Program helps graduate students prepare to be successful as students and scholars at Syracuse University and as teachers, advisors, and role models in their teaching assistant positions.

Career Exploration and Planning provides resources and events related to career research.

Job Search Preparation (MA) resources, events and appointments from the Graduate School for masters-level students.

Job Search Preparation (Ph.D) resources, events and appointments from the Graduate School for doctoral students.

Future Professoriate Program provides students with the experience, confidence, and documented performance you need to excel as faculty in higher education.

Research Communication Digital Badge teaches students how to communicate their research to various audiences.

Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities works to provide a fair and engaging process for the resolution of alleged violations of the Code of Student Conduct and aims to cultivate a safe and secure environment in which all students can succeed and grow as engaged community members.

Office of the University Ombuds provides an informal, confidential, neutral and independent resource to address concerns or questions openly without fear of retaliation or judgment.

The Office of Learning Communities offers a unique blend of in and out-of-the-classroom experiences that bring together students who share a particular lifestyle, interest, or goal.

The LGBT Resource Center provides education, advocacy, support, and safe space for lesbian, gay, transgender, questioning and straight-allied members of the Syracuse University community.

The Office of Equal Opportunity, Inclusion, & Resolution Services assist students, faculty, staff, and others on matters involving discrimination, sexual misconduct, remediation of access barrier concerns, training, and development.

The Office of Multicultural Affairs supports and promotes the academic achievement, multicultural competence, social development, civic engagement, and retention of students of historically underrepresented racial/ethnic groups at SU.

The Disability Cultural Center provides social, cultural, and educational programming related to disability and disability culture at SU.

The Office of Diversity and Inclusion provides support and resources for DACA/Undocumented students.

The Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services provides problem-solving, education, and support for students who commute from home or live in off-campus housing.

The Office of Student Living creates residential communities where living and learning experiences prepare students to pursue their life goals.

Connective Corridor creates a connection between the City and University, making it easier and more feasible for students to access many great downtown activities.

The Center for International Services resource for international students, scholars and their dependents on issues related to immigration status, employment, cultural, social and academic concerns which impact your success at Syracuse University. 

The Office of Community Engagement provides students, faculty and staff with authentic engagement opportunities that allow them to interact with the world around them.

Student Centers and Programming Services manages the Schine and Goldstein Student Centers and schedules non-academic programs on campus. It provides support services for technical needs, room scheduling and safety for programs in the facilities.

The Office of Student Activities oversees student organizations and SU Traditions events, such as Homecoming, Senior Celebration and the Pulse performing arts program.

The Office of Fraternity and Sorority Affairs works with the University's 47 fraternities and sororities and their five governing councils.

Hendricks Chapel provides spiritual programs, counseling and activities, and hosts events for members of the University community.

The Office of Parent and Family Services promotes awareness and involvement for SU families and provides support for them when they need it.

The Syracuse University’s Office of Research Integrity and Protections (ORIP) provides administrative services to university researchers to facilitate research and ensure regulatory compliance with applicable federal regulations, laws and University policies.

Student Legal Services provides full-time undergraduate or graduate student paying the full-time activities fee free legal advice and, in certain situations, court representation.

Dean of Students supports students with absence notifications, bias response and education, case management, crisis support, emergency aid, medical leave of absence, procedural advising, readmissions, referrals to campus resources, sexual and relationship violence support.

Light Work Lab provides direct support through residencies, publications, exhibitions, a community-access digital lab facility, and other related projects to emerging and under-represented artists working in the media of photography and digital imaging.

Department of Marriage & Family Therapy Student Support Services.

The SU MFT department also offers student supports. The M.A. in M.F.T. program at Syracuse University advances the success and retention of students in ways that are consistent with the program’s mission, goals, student learning outcomes, and anti-discrimination policy. Retention efforts are structured into the program as supports for student success and include but are not limited to orientation, regular advising opportunities, field liaising, clinical/supervision documentation, feedback opportunities (both to and from students), forums, student support meetings, and remediation plans. The following areas outline our retention efforts:

Orientation:

Orientation is a mandatory event undertaken at the beginning of a student’s program that provides an opportunity to meet with faculty and other students of the program and gain information about expectation, policies and processes.

Student Academic Advising and Program of Study:

Academic advisors work with students to provide academic guidance throughout the program. Students are encouraged to meet each semester to review their Program of Study and address any concerns that may affect their ability to complete the program. Students needing additional support may meet with their academic advisor more frequently, have their Program of Study revised and/or be given referrals for additional resources to assist with their success in the program.

Field Liaising:

Master’s student engagement with field placement is supported through pre-placement meetings and site visit meetings. Site visits are scheduled for each semester that a student is in placement. Students needing additional support are provided opportunities for additional meetings and additional supports. PhD students work with their advisor to identify field placement opportunities depending on their clinical and research goals. Students are responsible for making sure sites meet state requirements for licensure.

Clinical and Supervision Documentation:

Students are required to log and turn in their clinical and supervision hours monthly. The department tracks hours and assists students in monitoring their progress toward completion of the clinical requirements for graduation. The Internship Placement Coordinator and advisors assist MA students in using this feedback to modify plans as necessary.

Mentoring:

Doctoral students begin working with an assigned faculty mentor when they start their PhD program.  Mentors meet regularly with students to identify their areas of interest, connect them to scholarly tasks and activities, and support their professional development. At the end of their course work, students are encouraged to identify an advisor to guide their internship and dissertation research. Students may choose to work with their initially assigned mentor or request to work with another faculty member.

Feedback Opportunities:

Opportunities to receive feedback regarding academic and clinic progress and development are implemented throughout a student’s program. Formal feedback regarding clinical performance occurs in practicum meetings and annual review meetings. Meetings with assigned advisors are also opportunities to provide and receive feedback.   Master’s students participate in the Clinical Readiness Interview at the end of the first semester of Practicum and continue to receive feedback through supervisor evaluations each semester that they are clinically active. The PhD program, including faculty and students, also meet regularly (1-2 times a semester) to identify challenges and opportunities for program growth. Additionally, students are encouraged to provide feedback to the department regarding expectations, sufficiency and climate through formal (surveys) and informal (focus groups and forums) means.

Student Support Meeting and Remediation Plans:

We strive to provide students with a clear indication of their development and competence in all areas of the program. In the event that a student does not pass the clinical readiness interview or is at risk of not meeting criteria for good standing in the department (See Criteria for Good Standing in the Department Section), a meeting will be conducted as needed based on faculty evaluation and recommendation. In this meeting, an assessment of the student’s academic and clinical functioning will be made. An individualized remediation plan will be developed with the student to assist with passing the required program milestones and successfully completing the program. A follow-up meeting will also be scheduled to monitor the student’s growth in these areas and progress in the program. Where students are unable to resolve the problematic issue, they may be counseled out or dismissed from the program. (See Remediation Policy and Dismissal policy for further details).

Registration for Degree in Progress and Dual Degrees

Students must maintain registration from time of matriculation until graduation. In those semesters when you are not registered for specific course or dissertation credits, you must register for G.R.D. 998, Degree in Progress, 0 credit. This allows you to maintain an active student status without tuition cost and entitles you to use all campus resources, including libraries and computers. Please be aware that masters students can be awarded full time student status while completing clinical requirements through the summer of their second year, for issues related to student loans.

When a student is working to fulfill the requirements for two or more distinct masters degrees at S.U., the minimum number of credits needed must be at least 80 percent of the combined total of Syracuse credits normally required for each of the separate degrees. When a student is planning to pursue a M.A. in M.F.T. and a doctoral degree in another field, the student should consult with the Chair as early as possible about appropriate protocol.

Students interested in the Dual Degree in Social Work and Marriage and Family Therapy must apply and be accepted to both programs and must complete the Social Work Degree before beginning Marriage and Family Therapy.

Graduation

Graduation Policy

The Syracuse University M.F.T. program follows the university policy regarding graduation and commencement. All academic and clinical requirements must be met before a student will receive their degree and graduate. If a student will have completed all requirements for graduation by December of that same year, they may be allowed to participate in the commencement processional in May. Students must also meet all required university requirements for graduation.

Procedure for Graduation

In the term in which you wish to receive a degree, you must (a) register for 0 or actual credit, (b) file a Diploma Request card by the due date (usually within the first few weeks of the term within which one is to graduate), (c) ensure that your Program of Study has been approved and filed with the Graduate School, (d) check that your transcript matches your Program of Study and that all necessary petitions for exceptions to published requirements have been approved and filed with the Graduate School, and (e) check that the Department has informed the Graduate School of the completion of any additional requirements (e.g., comprehensive examination or Masters project, practicum requirements, internship, qualifying examination, and dissertation oral examination). Additionally, students must have completed the required clinical and supervision hours and submit signed paperwork confirming these requirements have been met.

A.A.M.F.T. Membership

Students should maintain membership in A.A.M.F.T. throughout their enrollment in the M.A. and doctoral programs. M.A. students should apply for Student Membership in A.A.M.F.T. their first term in the core program and maintain registration until receiving their degree. Doctoral students should apply for Student, Associate, or Clinical Membership, depending upon their credentials.

A student is eligible to apply for Associate Membership when all requirements for the M.A. degree are complete. The Chair notifies A.A.M.F.T. when a student has completed all requirements for the degree so that they may begin as soon as possible to count the two years that must pass between completing degree requirements and applying for Clinical Membership. You may want to check to be sure that this is done. Within a few months after applying for Associate Membership, you will receive notification from A.A.M.F.T. regarding how many more client and supervision hours you will require for Clinical Membership. If this does not match your records, check with the Chair.

An individual who graduates from an accredited program is eligible to apply for Clinical Membership upon completion of the following: (a) a minimum of two years of M.F.T. clinical hours and supervision following completion of requirements for the M.A. degree; and (b) 200 hours of appropriate supervision and 1000 hours of face-to-face M.F.T. client hours. At least 100 of the 200 hours must be individual supervision. If you accumulate more than 500 client hours and 100 supervision hours while completing your M.A. degree, you will be credited with all of these hours provided that supervision and client hours have at least a 1-5 ratio.

Financial Aid and Other Awards

Need-Based Financial Aid (Student Loans)

Syracuse University offers federally funded student financial aid to qualified graduate students. The Financial Aid Office administers financially funded loans and Federal Work Study. To be eligible for federally funded student financial aid, you must be accepted into a program leading to a degree, not be in default or owe a refund on any previous student loan, be enrolled at least half time (6 credits per semester), maintain satisfactory academic progress, have financial aid transcripts from the colleges and universities you have attended sent to the S.U. Financial Aid Office, and be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen. To apply for such aid, you must file a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (F.A.F.S.A.), which is available from most college or university financial aid offices and high school guidance offices. When you complete your F.A.F.S.A., you must list Syracuse University as one of the schools to which you want the information sent. Within four weeks of submission, you should receive a Student Aid Report (S.A.R.) from the Department of Education. Syracuse University will receive this information approximately two weeks after you receive your SAR. You should apply for financial aid as far as possible before the beginning of the semester in which you enroll. Though you will not be notified about financial aid eligibility until you are admitted, you should not wait until you are admitted to file your F.A.F.S.A. Contact the S.U. Financial Aid Office for more information.

There are a number of Graduate Work Study opportunities on campus for persons who meet the eligibility requirements and who are willing to spend the time to ferret them out. The responsibilities and benefits vary greatly from position to position.

Graduate Assistantships

Outside of the M.F.T. department, assistantships come in various forms and sizes. The most common are teaching assistantships and research assistantships, either full-time (20 hours of work a week from the beginning of Fall term until the completion of Spring term) for 24 tuition credits plus a stipend or part time (10 hours of work a week) for 12 tuition credits and a stipend. Search and see what you can find, and then apply, apply, apply. Be sure to inform yourself of the benefits available to students on assistantship (e.g., health benefits, tuition benefits for spouse, and discounts at the bookstore).

University Fellowships

These are coveted and highly competitive awards for which Ph.D. students are nominated by their program or department. The deadline to be nominated is in early February. University Fellowships come in two forms -- the multiple year package (which generally consists of two years of fellowship interspersed by a year of assistantship) and the one-year award. Generally, the multiple year awards go to new applicants (in an effort to recruit outstanding students to the University), but students who are completing the M.A. degree at S.U. and who have been admitted to a doctoral program will be considered as new applicants. The one-year awards are for continuing students completing their doctoral program, and hence are given to students about to be enrolled in their final full year of study (e.g., completed all coursework and qualifying examination). A fellowship usually provides for 30 tuition credits and a stipend.

The Department of African American Studies also awards one-year African American Fellowships, either to new students or currently enrolled students. Students are expected to take one course each term in that Department and to have a strong interest in the field. The Graduate School also has listings of external awards for which students may be eligible.

College Scholarship

The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics provides a limited number of scholarships consisting of tuition hours for outstanding students who have been recommended by their departments. These are awarded once a year for the following year. Students who receive College Scholarships must be sure to use their tuition by the end of Spring term.

Travel Grants

Both the department and the college award monies to help defray cost of attendance at professional meetings to present a paper or serve as invited presenter. Both grant periods are in the fall and applications are typically due the first part of October. The application and award processes for the college and department are run separately. The chair of the department will have applications for both sets of awards. The awards are small, typically around $300; the department goal is to fund as many students as possible.

Teaching Fellowships and Outstanding T.A. Award

Each January, faculty are asked to nominate outstanding teaching assistants to compete for the 24 Teaching Fellow positions. Teaching Fellows serve as the core instructional staff during the summer T.A. Program orientation, serving as small group leaders and mentors to the University’s 300+ new T.A.s and contributing to the Program’s activities throughout the year. Fellows receive a stipend plus board. Applicants must submit an application, vita, and teaching portfolio containing evidence of teaching experience and competence. To be appointed a Teaching Fellow is a significant academic honor. If you are interested in competing, be sure your faculty know to nominate you. The Outstanding T.A. Award, one of the top honors bestowed upon graduate students by the University, is granted to about 4% of all T.A.s campus-wide and, again, is dependent upon nomination by faculty. Students who wish to be considered for any of these awards should begin early to develop the necessary teaching portfolio.

Redistribution of Credits

Students on fellowship or full-time assistantship who do not plan to take 9 credits each term (12 if you are a Fellow or College Scholar) must arrange with the Graduate School to have their credits “redistributed” or they will lose their allotted remitted tuition. This usually means petitioning to have some tuition credits transferred to the summer. This is best done the semester before the credits are to be redistributed.

If you are a first or second year M.F.T. M.A. student on a full-time assistantship, you must petition to have your credits “redistributed”. This is because, whereas you are given 9 credits of tuition a term (12 if on a fellowship) plus 6 in the summer, you usually register for 10 credits the first Fall, 8 credits the first spring, and 7 credits the first summer.

Residency Dates and Requirements for Online Program

Online students in the S.U. online M.F.T. master's program are required to participate in one five-day residency (M.F.T. 750). The residency will be in session from 12:00-5:00 Monday; 8:30 to 5:00 Tuesday-Thursday; and 8:30-12:00 Friday (eastern time). Residencies provide networking and mentoring opportunities for students; and facilitate discussions with faculty concerning relevant issues, course matriculation, licensure issues and state/national exams. During residency, students will begin a course (M.F.T. 750) that will be completed during the remainder of the semester. Students will receive an orientation to the M.F.T. Department as part of the residency. The M.F.T. Department will provide lunch and two breaks daily when residencies are in session. Students should consider the following residency costs: transportation, lodging, meals and textbooks purchased prior to residency. We discourage students from bringing their families during residency as the coursework is intensive and requires a considerable amount of study and preparation time, leaving no time for extracurricular activities. Waiving of residency requirements will not be considered.

Legal Disclaimer for M.F.T. Practicum and Supervision (Online Program)

If the Department of Marriage and Family Therapy at Syracuse University has, in good faith, approved clinical hours at a site in which hours counted by the student and signed by the supervisor are subsequently denied by a state board due to misrepresentation of qualifications on the part of the supervisor and/or agency director, or the trainee, the M.F.T. Department cannot be held liable for loss of hours or income or for expenses incurred by the student or in any other way held liable. This makes it especially important that you consult with the program director of your faculty advisor if you have any questions about your site, your supervision, or issues regarding the earning of hours.

The Department of Marriage and Family Therapy at Syracuse University is not responsible for finding the Practicum site or clinical supervisor for students. The student is responsible to identify the practicum site and connect the Program Director or Coordinator of the Practicum with the site to arrange for a memorandum of understanding and a formal interview for the student.

M.F.T. students can fulfill practicum requirements for training at sites only after the Syracuse University program manager or program director has approved the site and signed an M.O.A. Agreement with the site. Please note: criminal background checks are required by certain internship sites. Further, having a criminal background may create an additional barrier for students in securing an internship site and pursuing licensure. The student is expected to discuss any potential issues with program staff upon admission to ensure appropriate planning for the student.

Masters of Arts in Marriage & Family Therapy 

(Program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education - C.O.A.M.F.T.E.)

Goals and Objectives 

The M.A. Program in Marriage and Family Therapy is a 60-credit hour curriculum accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (C.O.A.M.F.T.E). It is designed to meet the academic requirements for Clinical Membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy and is intended for mature individuals who have a strong commitment to the family therapy profession. All M.F.T. core courses are open only to matriculated students.

All students are expected to take the basic clinical courses in marriage and family therapy theory and techniques during their first year in the Program. During the first semester of coursework, students observe therapy and are a part of therapy teams at the Couple and Family Therapy Center. Beginning with the second semester of coursework, if clinically ready, students have direct client contact, which continues until the completion of 500 hours of supervised clinical practice with individuals, couples, and families. All students spend one year providing therapy in the on-site Couple and Family Therapy Center, which is well equipped for videotape and live supervision. They also see clients in off-campus practica sites after their first semester of client contact. At the conclusion of their program of study, students have the option of completing either a one-day written comprehensive examination, presenting a Capstone Masters project or a Masters thesis.

Master’s Academic Program

M.F.T. Course Requirements 60 Credits Total

Marriage and Family Therapy Required Courses (51 credits)

M.F.T. 661 Introduction to M.F.T. Practice (3 credits)

M.F.T. 662 System Dynamics in a Group Setting (3 credits)

M.F.T. 671 Introduction to Family Systems (3 credits)

M.F.T. 672 Couple Therapy, Theory and Techniques (3 credits)

M.F.T. 681 M.F.T. Ethics and Issues (3 credits)

M.F.T. 682 M.F.T. Theory and Techniques (3 credits)

M.F.T. 684 Intro to Cultural Diversity: Theory & Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 688 Family Therapy Across the Life Cycle (3 credits)

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues for the Helping Professional (3 credits)

M.F.T. 750 Intro. to Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum (3 credits)

M.F.T. 760 Marriage and Family Practicum I (3 credits)

M.F.T. 761 Marriage and Family Practicum II (3 credits)

M.F.T. 762 Marriage and Family Practicum III (3 credits)

M.F.T. 763 Marriage and Family Practicum IV (3 credits)

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology (3 credits)

M.F.T. 781 Social Work Practice/Alcohol & Other Drugs (3 credits)

M.F.T. 663 Applied Research in Social Work (3 credits)

M.F.T. 997 Master’s Project/Thesis/Comprehensive Exam (0 credits)

M.F.T. Elective Courses (3 courses - 9 credits total)

M.F.T. 603 Introduction to Trauma Studies (3 credits)

M.F.T. 644 Family Therapy with L.G.B.T.Q. Youth (3 credits)

M.F.T. 645 Queering Theory, History and Clinical Practice (3 credits)

M.F.T. 686 Play Therapy (3 credits)

S.W.K. 626 Persons in Social Context (3 credits)

M.F.T. 641 Divorce Mediation (3 credits)

M.F.T. 687 Spirituality in Therapy (3 credits)

H.F.S. 621* Statistical Concepts I (3 credits)

M.F.T. 643 Family Therapy with Complex Trauma (3 credits)

M.F.T. 642 Couple and Family Therapy/L.G.B.T.Q. Relationships (3 credits)

M.F.T. 689 Migration and Mental Health (3 credits) 

M.F.T. 764 Practicum in Marriage and Family Therapy V (1-3 credits)

*Students who are planning to apply to the doctoral program are encouraged to take HFS 621

Master’s Program of Study

All students must file a typed Program of Study with the Chair before the beginning of their second year of study. Upon approval by the Chair, the student will send two copies to the Graduate School and submit one for their official Program file. It will be necessary to amend this Program of Study prior to graduation if the actual courses taken are different than those originally submitted.

Students may transfer in up to 12 credits of appropriate graduate-level coursework from other universities if they have received a grade of B or better in the course. Students wishing to transfer in credits should file their Program of Study by the end of their first term of study and file a petition if they wish to substitute transfer credits for a required course. Students, who wish to use coursework taken prior to seven years before their degree date, must file a petition providing evidence that the student has maintained current knowledge in the field to do so.

Master’s Academic Advisor

Faculty members serve as academic advisors for students enrolled in the master’s degree program. The academic advisor is responsible for overseeing the program of study process as well as ensuring that all requirements have been completed satisfactorily for graduation.

Master’s Project/Thesis or Comprehensive Examination

Students decide whether they wish to complete an M.F.T. Capstone Project/Thesis or take the comprehensive examination. Students cannot choose the project/thesis option after failing the comprehensive examination or the comprehensive examination option after failing to have their final project approved. Once a student has indicated in writing a plan to take the comprehensive examination, the only way to fulfill the requirements for graduation is to successfully pass the examination (students are allowed to retake the examination two times). Conversely, once a student has indicated a plan to pursue the Master’s Project/Thesis and the associated proposal has been approved, the student cannot decide to elect to take the comprehensive examination. Students planning to enter the M.F.T. doctoral program are encouraged to use the Master’s Project/Thesis as an opportunity to gain research experience.

Master’s Capstone Project

Students who are not engaging in thesis research, or taking comprehensive examinations, must complete an MFT-related capstone project and be at Peck Hall one day at the end of spring semester (date and time to be announced). Students who are completing a thesis are invited (but not required) to participate as well in the research poster sessions.

Students can choose one of the following options for their capstone project:

  1. Research proposal: Closely following guidelines for final research proposal MFT 663/SWK 662 (if you have not taken this course, please contact Dr. Gangamma for research proposal guidelines), students may choose to present a proposal for research on any topic of interest relevant to MFT.
  2. Clinical case studies: Students may choose to present a clinical case including - detailed description of theoretical conceptualization, intervention planning and implementation, outcome, cultural competence, and role of self of therapist. Please remove all identifying information about the case so that clients' privacy is completely and absolutely protected. To insure complete confidentiality, meet with the supervisor of the case you are presenting and review methods for de-identification. Supervisor and student must sign Form A: Capstone De-identification Authorization Form and the Form must be submitted to Beth Ciciarelli one week prior to presentation.
  3. Special topics related to MFT practice and/or research: Students may also choose to present information that advances MFT training. Topics may include and are not limited to - presenting problems, issues of diversity, cultural humility, specialized treatment approaches, working with special communities or groups, etc.

Presentation format:

  1. Research poster sessions: Research proposals will be presented in the form of an academic poster summarizing research question, review of literature, proposed methodology and implications. Students will be ready to answer questions from faculty, staff, students, and guests.
  2. Symposia: Clinical case studies and Special topics will be presented in symposia. Groups of 3-4 presenters will present their topics for about 10 minutes each. Groups will consist of topics around a similar idea or theme. A member of the faculty will serve as moderator for each session. Presentations will be followed by Q & A for about 15 minutes.

Evaluation rubrics for your presentation will be distributed during the spring semester in which you will be presenting your capstone project.

Students must complete a Master's Project Proposal Form and have it approved by their mentor by early spring (date to be announced). A Presentation Approval Form must also be submitted to and signed by the mentor prior to the final presentation.

M.F.T. Thesis Policy and Procedure 

Students interested in conducting master’s theses must meet with an M.F.T. advisor to begin the process. Once an advisor has approved of the thesis idea, the student asks at least one additional M.F.T. faculty member(s) to be on her/his committee. Once a meeting occurs with the student, advisor and additional family member(s), the Masters Thesis Proposal Form is signed by the student, advisor, additional M.F.T. faculty member(s), and Chair of the Research Committee (who may be the advisor or the additional M.F.T. faculty member).

Students will need I.R.B. approval before data is collected unless an exemption is met (please see Chair of Research Committee for exemption).

Students must submit both the Proposal and the Final Thesis to faculty on their committees at least a week before the meetings occur.

Once the thesis is completed and approved by the M.F.T. advisor, the student must ask two other M.F.T. faculty members (either tenure track or professors of practice) to be part of their oral examination committee. One faculty member will be assigned as the oral examination committee chairperson and the other will be assigned as a reader of the final thesis. In other words, the oral examination committee consists of at least four voting members that include the M.F.T. advisor, the additional member(s) who approved the Proposal Form, an oral examination committee chairperson, and a reader. The oral examination is closed to other people unless the student chooses, in consultation with her/his advisor, to invite others (at least one week before the defense date).

The committee chair will preside over the exam and ensure that department/school/college and Graduate School/Graduate Degree Certification Office regulations and declared policies are followed.

Your oral examination committee chairperson will prepare a report that reflects one of the following statuses: pass; pass with minor revisions (generally editorial); pass with major revisions (substantive); not pass. You are entitled to an explanation from the committee concerning the results of the examination.

A master’s thesis must meet the requirements of the Syracuse University Graduate School guidelines for a thesis proposal. Guidelines for a thesis are located on the Graduate School "What You Need to Graduate" web page.

Students planning to complete a Masters Project or Thesis should register for M.F.T. 997 (Masters Project/Thesis) for 0 credits.

M.F.T. Master’s Thesis Policy and Procedure

Students interested in conducting master’s theses must meet with an M.F.T. advisor to begin the process. Once an advisor has approved of the thesis idea, the student asks at least one additional M.F.T. faculty member(s) to be on their committee. Once a meeting occurs with the student, advisor and additional family member(s), the Master’s Thesis Proposal Form is signed by the student, advisor, additional M.F.T. faculty member(s), and Chair of the Research Committee (who may be the advisor or the additional M.F.T. faculty member).

Students will need I.R.B. approval before data is collected unless an exemption is met (please see Chair of Research Committee for exemption).

Students must submit both the Proposal and the Final Thesis to faculty on their committees at least a week before the meetings occur.

Once the thesis is completed and approved by the M.F.T. advisor, the student must ask two other M.F.T. faculty members (either tenure track or professors of practice) to be part of their oral examination committee. One faculty member will be assigned as the oral examination committee chairperson and the other will be assigned as a reader of the final thesis. In other words, the oral examination committee consists of at least four voting members that include the M.F.T. advisor, the additional member(s) who approved the Proposal Form, an oral examination committee chairperson, and a reader. The oral examination is closed to other people unless the student chooses, in consultation with their advisor, to invite others (at least one week before the defense date).

The committee chair will preside over the exam and ensure that department/school/college and Graduate School/Graduate Degree Certification Office regulations and declared policies are followed.

Your oral examination committee chairperson will prepare a report that reflects one of the following statuses: pass; pass with minor revisions (generally editorial); pass with major revisions (substantive); not pass. You are entitled to an explanation from the committee concerning the results of the examination.

A master’s thesis must meet the requirements of the Syracuse University Graduate School guidelines for a thesis proposal. Guidelines for a thesis can be found at: Graduate Student Thesis or Dissertations Checklist.

Students planning to complete a Master’s Project or Thesis should register for M.F.T. 997 (Masters Project/Thesis) for 0 credits.

Master’s Comprehensive Examination

The Comprehensive Examination is designed to provide students an opportunity to demonstrate the ability to integrate their coursework and clinical training in a creative and scholarly fashion. The Examination is taken at the completion of all required academic credit hours. Any work required for the removal of incompletes must have been submitted to and approved by the appropriate faculty member prior to the student sitting for the Examination. Students may elect to take the Examination prior to the completion of M.F.T. 760 if they have obtained 400 or more clinical hours.

The Examination is an eight-hour, closed book, essay examination that may be taken at a time mutually convenient to the student and the faculty. A student should inform the Chair in writing of their intent to take the Examination at least one month prior to the planned date of the Examination. At the time of the Examination, the student will receive a description of a clinical case about which they is to answer the following three questions:

  1. Discuss the dynamics of the family, demonstrating knowledge of socio-cultural variables, child development, and family systems.
  2. Select three schools of family therapy and briefly describe the approach which each would take in the assessment and treatment of the family.
  3. Present your own detailed treatment plan for the family (problems, goals, and strategies), indicating your rationale for the suggested treatment.

The Examination will be evaluated by the Chair and, at his discretion, other M.F.T. staff members. Satisfactory performance will require demonstration of the ability to integrate knowledge from marriage and family therapy and to apply this knowledge to the development of an appropriate clinical treatment plan. In the event that the student fails to pass, they may retake the Examination a total of two times. On occasion, the committee may request that the student redo a portion of the original examination; in this case, the retake must be completed within one month from the date of this decision.

Master’s Clinical Requirements

500 Supervised Clinical Hours

Students must complete 500 supervised clinical hours of direct (i.e., face-to-face) client contact with individuals, couples, families, and therapy groups at approved practica sites prior to graduation. They must be enrolled in M.F.T. Practicum, for at least five semesters and should maintain a minimum of 5-8 direct client contact hours per week each semester they are enrolled. Students should enroll in M.F.T. Practicum the first semester of their graduate work so that they can begin center meetings, accrue team hours, and acclimate themselves to the Couple and Family Therapy Center. Before students can see clients in the Center, they are expected to complete M.F.T. 681: M.F.T. Ethics and Issues (or the equivalent) and M.F.T. 661: Introduction to M.F.T. Practice (or the equivalent). In some rare instances, an alternative course of action can be approved. Students begin to see clients during the second semester (after passing the clinical readiness interview) and are expected to continue seeing clients throughout the summer and to arrange with their supervisor for appropriate vacation periods. At least 250 hours must consist of relational work with couples or families present in the therapy room. Fifty relational hours and 50 individual hours, totaling 100 hours may be obtained by serving as a member of a live- supervision team if the student is present to observe the same client case for an extended period of time and engages in the planning of treatment. When supervised by an A.A.M.F.T. approved supervisor, students may count up to 50 hours of psycho-education towards their 500 total hours.

Twelve months of client contact must be completed at the Couple and Family Therapy Center. Students begin to see clients in the Couple and Family Therapy Center at the beginning of the second term in the M.F.T. core unless the faculty decide on the basis of performance in the Fall courses that they are not clinically ready to do so. All students have a clinical readiness interview with the faculty and Director of Clinical Services before seeing clients. They will continue to see clients in the Center for one full year. During the spring term of their first year they should interview for an outside placement at an approved community site, planning to begin this placement as early as June but preferably no later than the following fall. Agency representatives from the practicum sites visit the Center and students are informed of available sites and who to contact regarding a placement interview. Agencies make the final decision regarding how many and which students they can take as trainees. The following approved community practica sites have been used in the recent past: Liberty Resources, Catholic Charities, St. Joseph’s Hospital, Vera House, C.A.C. Foundation, Family Counseling Services of Cortland County, Inc., Harvest House Counseling, Alkira Psychotherapy, and The Salvation Army.

Students in practica must submit to the Office Coordinator monthly statements of their client and supervision hours, signed by their supervisor(s). These monthly records are kept in the student’s practicum folder and a cumulative tally compiled at the end of each academic term. At the time of graduation, a letter is sent to A.A.M.F.T. certifying the total number of client and supervision hours and the date of completion of all graduation requirements. Students who later apply for Clinical Membership may begin counting the required two-years post-degree from this official date of completion (which may be before the official graduation date).

Additionally, students must keep a record of hours spent at their practicum site, including client appointments, supervision, meetings, and time spent working on-site to complete case notes. These hours may be used to fulfill licensure requirements in some states.

Requirements for Supervision

Students must receive 1 hour of supervision for every 5 client hours and accumulate a minimum of 100 hours of group and individual supervision during the required 500 client hours. Students must experience both individual and group supervision during the course of their practica, and individual supervision must occur at least once every other week during the time that students are seeing clients. Individual supervision is counted when 1-2 students are receiving supervision together or one student is receiving live supervision. Group supervision may include no more than six students in a supervisory group. When more than two students are in the supervision group, students behind the one-way mirror receive credit for group supervision if (a) at least one supervisor is present behind the mirror, (b) there are no more than 5 students behind the mirror, and (c) the supervision experience involves an interactive process among the supervisor and the treatment team. The student therapist(s) working directly with the client may count the time as individual supervision.

At least 50 hours of the total supervision of a student's clinical work must involve the use of raw data (i.e., either direct observation, videotapes, or audiotapes). At least 25 hours of this supervision will be based on direct observation or videotapes. When students are involved in the direct or videotape supervision of a group member and a supervisor is present, all of the students may count this as direct or videotape supervision. Co-therapy counts as clinical hours if both student therapists are students and share in the responsibility for the case such as making interventions in therapy, making the appointments, writing the notes, and being the contact to manage crisis situations. When the student's supervisor is the co-student therapist the hour is counted only as supervision, unless the student also has primary responsibility for the case.

Requirements for M.F.T. Supervisor Eligibility

All official supervision of M.F.T. students must be conducted by experienced marital and family student therapists who are either A.A.M.F.T. Approved Supervisors, Supervisors-in- Training, or the equivalent(* see below). When students receive occasional supervision from persons without the necessary credentials or by persons who are doctoral students in our Program, they may not count these supervision hours on their monthly records and their client hours must be signed for by their official supervisor. All supervisors must be actively involved in clinical practice and students should have some opportunity to observe their supervisor engaged in clinical work.

Under special circumstances, students may receive client hours at a placement where there is no A.A.M.F.T. Approved Supervisor available. When this occurs, the student must augment the supervision of these client hours with supervision by an Approved Supervisor or Supervisor Candidate. In this case, the student will have two supervisors: The agency supervisor, who will be responsible for case management, and the Approved Supervisor or Supervisor Candidate, who will help the student apply theory to practice. Only the A.A.M.F.T. Approved Supervisor or Supervisor Candidate hours may be counted toward the required 100 hours.

*The criteria for Supervisor Equivalent include all of the following: 

a) Designation as a Clinical Fellow; or meeting the requirements for Clinical Fellow status with the exception of having to meet the curriculum requirement for Clinical Fellow. If supervisors do not meet the course requirements for the Clinical Fellow designation, then they must demonstrate at least one course or 45 clock hours of CEU training in each educational content area; or be independently licensed as a marriage and family therapist;

b) A valid/state or provincial license/registration in a mental health profession;

c) demonstrated 5 years of professional work experience in MFT;

d) demonstrated education and experience in systemic/relational supervision. Supervision education may be demonstrated by completing 30 hours of coursework or continuing education in MFT supervision. Supervision experience can be demonstrated by at least 3 years of experience supervising MFTs, and 36 hours of supervised supervision.

Registration for Clinical Practicum

Students must satisfactorily complete M.F.T. 750 (Introduction to M.F.T. Practicum) and at least 12 credits of M.F.T. Practicum before graduation, Students register for M.F.T. 750 in their first semester and in a Practicum section for each of the next four semesters of their coursework. A student must take one additional term of Practicum for each term they receives a grade of less than B-. If after two full years, students require additional time to complete the clinical requirements, they will register for one additional Practicum section (M.F.T. 764) for each additional semester required. Students must stay at the placement site in which they are assigned until they complete their 500 hours (unless they begin doctoral work in another C.O.A.M.F.T.E.- accredited program and make arrangements with the program and S.U.’s Director of Clinical Services). Grades for M.F.T. Practicum will be determined by the supervisor or, in the case of students who have an outside placement and a placement at the Couple and Family Therapy Center, by the Center supervisor who will average the grade they would give the student with the grade given by the outside supervisor.

Student Membership in A.A.M.F.T.

All students must become student members of A.A.M.F.T. before beginning to see clients. National dues are $58.00. Division (state/province) membership is automatic when the student joins. New and transferring applicants also pay a non-refundable $25.00 application-processing fee.

Professional Liability Insurance

Professional liability insurance will be provided to all students through a group insurance contract arranged by the university. A $15 course fee will be charged with Spring semester Practicum registration to cover the liability insurance cost.

Regulations Regarding Private Practice

The 500 client hours required for M.F.T. 760 cannot be done in private practice owned by the student (i.e., fees paid to the student therapist by the client for services rendered outside of a University-approved agency), even if under the supervision of an Approved Supervisor. The policy of A.A.M.F.T. is that the M.A. degree is the qualifying degree for the field and, therefore, a person should not hold him/herself out as a marriage and family student therapist before having received a M.A. in Marriage and Family Therapy or having completed an equivalent program of study.

Doctor of Philosophy in Marriage & Family Therapy

(Program accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education - C.O.A.M.F.T.E.) 

Goals and Objectives 

The 72-credit doctoral program in Marriage and Family Therapy at Syracuse University seeks to prepare scholars who will advance research, theory, and teaching in the field of marriage and family therapy. Students are prepared primarily for research, teaching, and supervisory positions in graduate degree-granting institutions, training institutes, and health care settings. The program builds upon a clinical Master's Degree in Marriage and Family Therapy, and is designed to provide students with an understanding of advanced theory in marriage and family therapy with expertise in process and outcome research methodology in marriage and family therapy. Ph.D. students must take all required courses in residence and not on-line.

Academic Program Course Requirements

The doctoral program builds on an M.A. degree in M.F.T. or completion of courses equivalent to the C.O.A.M.F.T.E. Standard M.A. Curriculum. The 72 credit-hour curriculum consists of 33 credit hours from a M.A. in M.F.T. or equivalent; 12 credits of advanced theory and practice; 12 credits of advanced research methodology; 3 credits of elective; 6 credits of advanced practicum; and 6 credits of dissertation. Requirements also include a 9-month internship (advanced practical experience component) and satisfactory completion of the doctoral qualifying examination and the doctoral dissertation and related oral examination.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements

Advanced Theory and Practice (12 credits*)

Four courses (12 credits) from the following:  

M.F.T. 861 - Supervision in Marriage and Family Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 862 - Advanced Family Therapy with Children and Adolescents (3 credits)

M.F.T. 863 - Advanced Couple Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 865 - Advanced Family Therapy Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 875 - Cultural Diversity: Family Theory and Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 773 - Family Violence: Theory and Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 777 - Family Perspectives on Gender Roles and Socialization (3 credits)

M.F.T. 778 - Loss Across the Life Cycle: Family Theory and Therapy (3 credits)

M.F.T. 864 - Family Systems and Family Health (3 credits)

*Students who have taken one of these courses as part of their M.A. program may substitute an elective for one of the two required courses.


Advanced Research Methodology (12 credits)

H.F.S. 622 - Statistical Concepts II* (3 credits)

H.F.S. 732 - Research Methods/H.F.S. II (3 credits)

M.F.T. 882 - Assessment and Research Methods in M.F.T. (3 credits)

M.F.T. 885 - Qualitative Research Methods in Family Therapy (3 credits) (must take prior to, or concurrently with M.F.T. 882)

*If student does not come in with the equivalent of H.F.S. 621, elective must be used for H.F.S. 621, as it is a pre-requisite for H.F.S. 622


Elective 3 credits

Advanced Practicum 6 credits total

M.F.T. 860 Advanced Family Therapy Practicum (6 credits)

Masters Courses (Transferred) (Maximum 33 credits)

Internship (1,000 Hours of client contact)

M.F.T. 960 - Internship in Marriage and Family Therapy (0 credits)

Dissertation (M.F.T. 999 Dissertation 6 credits)

(You may register for dissertation hours before beginning your dissertation.)

Total credits required - 72 credits

Academic Advisor/Mentor

Students will be assigned an M.F.T. faculty member as their advisor at the time of admission to the Program. Unless they elect to change advisors and another faculty member agrees to serve as their advisor, this person will remain their advisor, serve as their graduate research advisor, and advise their dissertation.

Program of Study

All students must work with their advisor to file a typed Program of Study with the Graduate Director, before the end of their first semester of doctoral study. Upon approval by the Graduate Director, the student will send two copies to the Graduate School and submit one for her/his official Program file. It will be necessary to amend this Program of Study if the actual courses taken are different than those originally submitted.

Students may transfer up to 33 credits of appropriate graduate coursework from other universities if they have received a grade of B or better in the course. Practicum courses may not count as transfer courses. Students who have received an M.A. in M.F.T. from a C.O.A.M.F.T.E.- accredited program will be granted 33 credits automatically. Other students will have their programs evaluated on an individual basis in order to determine the extent to which their prior coursework was equivalent to the required M.F.T. M.A. coursework.


Clinical Requirements

All M.F.T. doctoral students are expected to continue clinical practice throughout their graduate study and to complete, prior to graduation, the 1000 supervised client contact hours with individuals, couples, and families. These 1000 client hours may be accumulated prior to doctoral work and/or during the doctoral practicum and internship experience. Up until they complete their doctoral internship, doctoral students are expected to submit signed monthly statements of client and supervision hours, and these hours must meet the same standards outlined for the Master's Program. At least 50% of their client contact hours must be with couples or families physically present in the therapy room, at least 50% of their supervision must be individual supervision, and at least 50% of their supervision must be based on live, videotaped, or audiotaped session data. Doctoral students must receive 1 hour of supervision for every 5 client contact hours, with the exception of internship students who must have one hour of supervision weekly. All supervision must be by Approved Supervisors, Supervisors Candidates or the equivalent.

M.F.T. 860, Advanced M.F.T. Practicum

All doctoral students must see clients at the Couple and Family Therapy Center under the supervision of the M.F.T. faculty for two years and register for a total of 6 credits of M.F.T. 860. At the end of summer session 2 of their final year in the Center, students will transfer remaining clinic cases to students working in the Center. Because there is a gap in services until new students arrive, please work carefully with the doctoral faculty for on-call emergency coverage of all transfer cases.

It is also expected that second-year doctoral students help train first-year students in the Center procedures and paperwork requirements.

M.F.T. 960, M.F.T. Internship (Advanced Practical Experience Component)

Students cannot begin the internship until all coursework and case notes are up to date and the qualifying examination is passed (unless otherwise negotiated with the doctoral committee).

Students are expected to arrange for their own internship in consultation with their advisor. Every effort should be made to create an internship experience that promises to best meet the individual's particular scholarly and professional goals. Students will work with their advisor to develop a contract for their internship that best suits their individual scholarship needs. See below for internship (advanced practical experience component) requirements.

At least two months before beginning the internship, in consultation with their advisors, students should present in writing to the Graduate Director a proposal for how they wish to complete the internship requirement. The proposal (found on Blackboard) should clearly stipulate the basis and format for evaluation of the student's performance throughout the course of the internship. The student, advisor, internship supervisor(s), and Graduate Director must sign the internship contract before the internship can officially begin.

Students should register for M.F.T. 960 every semester they are on internship.

C.O.A.M.F.T.E. has stipulated that internship (advanced practical experience component) must meet the following criteria:

  • The Advanced Practical Experience Component: Programs that teach the advanced curriculum must offer the advanced experience component. Areas include selected experiences consistent with the program's mission, goals, and outcomes in any of the following: advanced research, grant-writing, teaching, supervision, consultation, advanced clinical theory, clinical practice/innovation, program development, leadership, or policy. In addition, programs may offer experiences in presenting and professional writing. The program must demonstrate appropriate and adequate mentoring of students during the experience. The advanced experiences offered by doctoral degree programs must address a minimum of two of the areas noted above and combined be over a minimum of 9 months.

  • Research experiences may include (not limited to) developing independent research projects, writing up manuscripts for publication and conference presentations, applying for external funding, and assisting in faculty research. Teaching experiences may include (not limited to) assisting or co-teaching with faculty members.

Doctoral Qualifying Examination

Doctoral students may take their qualifying exams once they have begun their last semester of coursework and completed all case notes. All students must have taken and passed their qualifying exams by the end of the first full (fall or spring) semester immediately following the completion of coursework. The examination is in three parts: a) written portion; b) research component; and c) oral examination. The doctoral committee will evaluate the qualifying exam materials.

In an effort to avoid scheduling difficulties and to allow students ample time to plan ahead, the doctoral qualifying oral examinations are offered four times a year. At the beginning of each semester the Graduate Director will provide students with a list of specific times, within the qualifying examination week, at which examinations will be held. Once students are certain of their readiness for the exam, they may schedule a time with the Director. If students need to cancel their examination, they may reschedule during the next qualifying examination week or at a time deemed appropriate by the faculty.

If students do not take qualifying examinations within six months of the completion of their last class, they will not be in good standing with the Program and must schedule a meeting with the faculty to plan a course of action.

Written Portion of the Qualifying Examination:

Each student must submit a paper that demonstrates a thorough understanding of their philosophy of family systems-based therapy, grounded in germinal and extant family therapy literature. There is no page limit for the paper. It must demonstrate doctoral level writing skills (correct grammar, proper paragraph and sentence structure, clear and succinct language, correct A.P.A. style and referencing).

The paper is to be prepared with minimal consultation from the advisor. While no faculty member can read student papers before they are submitted, conversations with faculty members are recommended. For instance, faculty members may discuss theoretical concepts, integration and application but written drafts of the exam will not be reviewed prior to submission.

It is recommended that students gain an understanding of the examination process by attending qualifying examinations of other students. It is also recommended that students seek consultation from their peers or other students about their written work before submitting their final qualifying examination paper. These recommendations are meant to encourage students to deeply reflect upon their work and submit a high-quality paper. A rubric for evaluation will be provided by students’ advisors at the beginning of their final spring semester.

Students’ theory of therapy paper is due by 5pm E.S.T. on the date that it is due and no late submissions will be accepted. If the paper is not received by 5pm, students will need to reschedule their exams.

The paper shall demonstrate the student's capacity for critical thinking and should include two primary sections:

  1. Theory of Therapy: An in-depth delineation of students’ theory of therapy, including a discussion of their assumptions about how change occurs, a description of related intervention strategies, an analysis of self-of-the-therapist reflection and their use of self in therapy, a social justice analysis of their theoretical orientation, and a statement about the definition of health.
  2. Students are expected to use germinal theorists when they reference theory. It is expected that students will have read the most important works that have been written by the theorists they are using. It is also expected that critiques written about theorists will be explored in their papers.
  3. If students are using multiple theoretical orientations, it is expected that they apply an in-depth analysis of ways to integrate the orientations and ways the integration may not be possible.
  4. Concrete examples of how students have used their theoretical orientation should be peppered throughout the theory of therapy paper. These examples may or may not be about the case they are presenting below.
  5. It is expected that use of self concepts involve self-of-the-therapist reflections. These reflections should be given their own section and infused throughout the paper.
  6. Description of Case: An in-depth description of one family or couple case which illustrates the above theory, including description of the clients, overview of the course of treatment, review of any assessment instruments utilized, discussion of related cultural and gender issues, and evaluation of the interventions given the context of the therapy. The role of supervision in the development of the case should be clear. Include at least one example of how supervision informed the work. This section of the paper should conclude with a detailed discussion of how the student’s theory was illustrated in the clinical work with the case.

Research Component:

Students will be given their research articles by 9am the day after they hand in the written portion of the qualifying examination to the faculty. The research article will be chosen by the faculty from the last five years of one of the major journals in family therapy. Students have a week from that day to write an in- depth critique of the article (8-10 pages) along with a research proposal designed to address and expand on the issues raised in the critique (8-10 pages). The research proposal is an elaboration of the ideas on how to re-do the study. The methodological design that is proposed can either be quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods. At the end of the week, students must submit the article critique and proposal to the faculty. Students may not consult faculty, students, family, or friends during this process. After submitting the research component of the qualifying examination, students have one week to prepare for the oral exam in both theory and research.

To give a specific example of the process written above:

  • If a student hands in their theory of therapy paper on the 17th of January, they will be given a research article that day.
  • Submit to faculty the article critique and research proposal on the 24th of January by 5:00 PM.
  • Clinical presentation and orals for theory and research will take place on the 31st of January.

Oral Presentation and Examination:

The oral examination is given two weeks after the student hands in their written portion to the faculty. The student should schedule a three-hour block of time for the oral presentation and defense.

The student is expected to present their theory of therapy and video clips of the case they wrote about in their written portion of the qualifying examination. The same case that was written about must be presented. The whole presentation should not exceed 45 minutes.

The dissertation committee will be present at the time of the oral examination and the defending student can decide to invite others. Only S.U. M.F.T. students are allowed to be present during the video clips and the defending student must use pseudonyms and caution when discussing the case.

Following the presentation, an oral examination will be conducted by the examining committee on the written portion, the research component, and the presentation. At the conclusion of the examination, the student and guests will leave the room while all committee members vote. Majority rules. If there is an even split among the faculty votes, the student’s advisor will break the tie. A student will receive a separate evaluation for each of the three portions of the qualifying exam. Each portion of the exam will be evaluated and rated according to the following system:

  • Pass with distinction—represents excellent work, clearly outstanding
  • Pass—sufficient completion of all requirements
  • Pass with revisions—some minor revisions required to complete requirements
  • Fail—unsatisfactory work in one or more areas; major revisions needed

In the case of failure or pass with revisions members of the examining committee will submit feedback to the student and the adviser will meet with the student to explain the reasons for failure and the desired changes. If the student is required to retake one or all parts, they will be allowed to have two repeats of the failed portion of the examination process. Students must take the examination within 90 days of the failed attempt. Students may not begin their internships until all three parts of the examination are completed. If the student does not pass all parts of the examination process the third time, they will be asked to withdraw from the M.F.T. Program. Students who fail only the written portion and/or research component may, at the discretion of the committee, not repeat the oral examination. Students who fail the oral part of their examinations must wait until the next time the exams are offered to take them again.

Students who fail the written and/or research part of the examination may not begin their internships until they resubmit and pass these portions.

Dissertation

Dissertation Proposal

Students may defend their dissertation proposal after all their course work is satisfactorily completed and the qualifying examination has been passed. The preparation of a dissertation proposal will be supervised by a dissertation committee composed of at least three faculty members chosen by the student on the basis of their area of special interest. The committee will be chaired by the student’s advisor and must include at least one other M.F.T. faculty member; the remaining member may come from either inside or outside the College. If the student and advisor deem it advisable and useful, they may add additional members.

After meeting with the dissertation advisor and committee to discuss the proposed research, the student will prepare a written proposal to the committee for their feedback and suggestions. When the advisor and student believe the written proposal to be complete, it will be submitted to the committee for their formal review and a date for oral presentation will be established. Immediately following the oral presentation and discussion, the dissertation committee will vote to approve the proposal. Following approval, the student will seek clearance from the University Institutional Review Board’s Human Subjects Committee to conduct the research.

Dissertation Oral Examination

Prior to the oral defense, two persons (in addition to the dissertation committee) will be recruited by the student and advisor to serve as readers of the completed dissertation and to participate in the oral examination. These persons can be faculty from the Department, the College, another department of the University, or external to the University. The student, with the advisor’s help, must also recruit a Chair for the oral defense, to represent the Graduate School at the defense meeting. At least three weeks before the defense, the student must file forms with the Graduate School designating members of the oral examination committee and submit the “Request for Exam” paperwork. At least two weeks before the defense, the student must provide all six members of the examination committee (advisor and two committee persons, two readers, and chair of the oral exam) with a final copy of the dissertation. The dissertation must meet all requirements as stated in Academic Rules and Regulations.

M.F.T. Faculty and Staff

Faculty

Thom deLara, M.S.W., M.B.A., Department Chair, Professor of Practice

Linda Stone Fish, Ph.D., Graduate Program Director, Endowed Professor

Dyane Watson, Ph.D., Assistant Director, Professor of Practice

Deborah Coolhart, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Rashmi Gangamma, Ph.D., Associate Professor

Daran Shipman, M.A., Adjunct

Clinical Staff

Tracey Reichert Schimpff, Ph.D., Director of Clinical Services

Lisa Tedeschi, M.A., Internship Coordinator

Administrative Staff

Beth Ciciarelli, Administrative Assistant

Anne Metzger-Wormuth, Clinic Office Coordinator

Appendix A: Master’s Project/Thesis Guidelines and Forms - 2019

Master’s Project/Thesis Guidelines

Master’s Project Master’s Project/Thesis or Comprehensive Examination

Students decide whether they wish to complete a master’s project/thesis or take the comprehensive examination (must have Advisor and Department Chair approval). Students cannot choose the project/thesis option after failing the comprehensive examination or the comprehensive examination option after failing to have their final project approved. Once a student has indicated in writing a plan to take the comprehensive examination, the only way to fulfill the requirements for graduation is to successfully pass the examination (students are allowed to retake the examination two times). Conversely, once a student has indicated a plan to pursue the Master’s Project/Thesis and the associated proposal has been approved, the student cannot decide to elect to take the comprehensive examination. Students planning to enter the M.F.T. doctoral program are encouraged to use the Master’s Project/Thesis as an opportunity to gain research experience.

Master’s Project/Thesis - Development of project proposal

The Master’s Project/Thesis is designed to allow students an opportunity for a creative  [scholarly experience. The student should arrange with the Department Chair to serve as Project Mentor. After the Department Chair has approved the topic, the student will complete the Master's Project/Thesis Proposal Form (see Administrative Assistant for copy). The signature of the Chair indicates that a contract has been established between the mentor and the student. If changes are requested, the student will resubmit the proposal with changes or submit a response letter addressing the concerns. After receiving written approval, the form is submitted to the Administrative Assistant who places the form in the student's permanent file. The student may then proceed with the project or the thesis.

If the project/thesis is a research study, students must receive I.R.B. approval Before conducting any research. This is true for research done outside of Syracuse University, as long as the research is being conducted or presented/published by an S.U. student, I.R.B. approval is needed.

Master’s Project - Approval of completed project

The project/thesis will be considered complete when the Department Chair gives final approval. The Chair may indicate in writing any changes required in order to receive approval. The student and Chair will work together to revise and resubmit the project/thesis. If a student is unable to obtain the necessary approval, they will fail the Master’s Project/Thesis.

A master’s project may include, but is not limited to the following examples:

  • a research project regarding a particular area of research that is of interest to the student (e.g., a comparison of battering in heterosexual and homosexual partners);
  • applied work (e.g., design of a treatment program for couples presenting with low sexual desire);
  • collaboration in on-going research with a faculty member (e.g., design instruments, analyze data); a grant proposal;
  • a presentation at a national or otherwise approved professional conference, with the student as either single or joint official presenter;
  • a manuscript accepted for publication in a refereed journal or as a book chapter, with student as first or second author.

A master’s thesis must meet the requirements of the Syracuse University Graduate School guidelines for a thesis proposal.

Students planning to complete a Master’s Project/Thesis should register for M.F.T. 997 (Master’s Project/Thesis) for 0 credits.

Master’s Project/Capstone Contract Form

Capstone Day May 2, 2019

Due: February 21, 2019 (Submit with signatures to Tracey Reichert-Schimpff)

Student Name: add name

Date Submitted: add date

Project Title: add title

Project Type: (chose one from below)

  • Research proposal
  • Clinical case study
  • Special topic related to M.F.T. practice and/or research

Description of Proposed Project: add a project description

Capstone presentation Type: (choose one below)

  • Research poster session
  • Symposia

Capstone timeline:

Date of project completion: add date

Date of meeting with mentor to discuss capstone presentation (must be before 4/18): add date


Mentor Signature:Date:
Student Signature: Date:


Master’s Thesis Proposal Form

Student: add name

Date Proposed: add date

Thesis Title: add title

Description of Proposed thesis:

(must include introduction, brief literature review, research question and study design and be no more than 1000 words; references and instruments you are planning to use must be included as well, though not within the 1000 word limit; please use additional paper)


M.F.T. Advisor Signature:

Date:

M.F.T. Faculty Member Signature:Date:

M.F.T. Faculty Member Signature:

Date:

Chair of Research Committee Signature:

Date:

Student Signature:

Date:


Electronic Dissertation/Thesis Submittal Checklist

Please read this checklist in its entirety. This checklist will hep you through the submittal process of your Dissertation/Thesis.

Before you begin:

Review the Syracuse University U.M.I. E.T.D. website so that you understand what is involved in preparing and submitting an electronic dissertation/thesis. You can establish a login and password at the Proquest submission site, however, submit only your final, approved dissertation/thesis. Important note: When you are selecting your publishing options, you will be presented with information regarding the Proquest Publishing.

Options (P.Q. publishing options) and IR publishing options. IR stands for Institutional Repository. SUrface is the name of Syracuse University's Institutional Repository. It is optional for you to choose to have your work available in SUrface. SUrface allows your work to be available via open access. This means your work will be found via search engines like google. Learn more about SUrface.

Review the format Guidelines for Doctoral Dissertations & Master’s Thesis:

  • Title Pages: An unsigned title page must be included in your final dissertation/thesis pdf. An original signed title page is to be signed and dated by your advisor and delivered to the Graduate School, 207 Bowne Hall. When signing your title page, your advisor is confirming that you have completed all of the revisions and/or requirements that were requested at the time of your defense. It is very important that the completion date on your title page appear as the month and year that you will graduate; e.g. June 2013, August 2013, December 2013 or May 2014.
  • Copyright Page: A copyright page must be included in your dissertation/thesis immediately following your Title Page.
  • Convert your dissertation/thesis to pdf: Once your advisor has approved your final dissertation/thesis you will need to convert your dissertation/thesis to an Adobe pdf file (or possibly multiple files). If you do not already know a method for doing so, there is an easy to use converter at the E.T.D. Administrator site that you can use once you log in.
  • Carefully review your converted pdf document to ensure there were no errors in the conversion (i.e. missing pages).
  • Submit the final, approved copy of the dissertation/thesis: Go to the Syracuse University U.M.I. E.T.D. website and follow the instructions there for submitting a dissertation/thesis. You should have your credit card handy so that you can pay Proquest online. You can start the process, logout, and login again later; your work will be saved. If you have any questions or encounter problems, contact Proquest electronically or by phone: 1.877.408.5027 (9am-6 pm E.S.T.). You may also check the Best Practices or FAQs pages on this website.
  • After you have submitted: You will receive an email acknowledging receipt of the dissertation/thesis.

The document will then be reviewed by the E.T.D. administrator in the Graduate School before it is approved and transmitted to Proquest/U.M.I. If there is something wrong with the file(s), someone will email you.

Appendix B: Clinical Readiness Rubric

1. Self-Awareness

1. Self awareness

Definition

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

1 point

A. Knowledge of self

Aware of thoughts, feelings, beliefs; Open to exploring self, family of origin as they relate to clinician development.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

B. Awareness of reactivity

Observes and manages self in interaction with other; sustains response flexibility in emotionally charged interaction; Self-regulates affective arousal; reflects on self emotion during arousal & interactively following arousal;

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

C. Ability to use voice

Can articulate beliefs and position while recognizing contextual factors of those showing difference from self; responds to diversity with positive professional regard.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development

2. Interpersonal Skills

2. Interpersonal Skills

Definition

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

1 point

A. Ability to stay present.

Uses self-presence and influence to promote strengths; balances effective listening and therapeutic system purpose; promotes process responsive to need.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

B. Ability to convey empathy and respect.

Generates trust and confidence in relationships; notes and addresses relationship breeches with effective repair; Demonstrates ability to connect deeply with others.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

C. Response to feedback.

Responds positively to feedback; open to learning and growth opportunities, integrates suggestions into work.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

3. Academic Skills

3 Academic Skills

Definition

5 points

4 points

3 points

2 points

1 point

A. Understanding of M.F.T. theory and concepts.

Integrates concepts/theories into clear working model of therapy; engages and understands abstract concepts; accurate grasp of theoretical models and constructs; uses knowledge as resource for supervision and practice.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

B. Writing skills

Writes clearly and produces quality graduate level work;

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

C. Organizational skills

Demonstrates ability to be organized, manage time and responsibilities; responsive to requests for action.

Student displays exceptional skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays advancing skill in multiple areas of target-level competencies.

Student displays target-level competencies with early skill development.

Student displays beginning recognition of target-level competencies with readiness for skill development.

Student displays difficulty engaging this area that may jeopardize future skill development.

Appendix C: S.U. M.F.T. Masters Evaluation Timeline

Program Outcomes

Program Outcome

Variable

Benchmark

How often

Analyzed by: (Title)

Instrument

#1. Student progress: Students will successfully complete the S.U.M.F.T. program requirements and graduate.

Graduation Rates

1. At least 80% of admitted students will graduate within five years of registering for their first M.F.T. course.

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

S.U.M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

#2 Alumni Achievement: Graduated students will be successful in pursuing either a career in Marriage and Family Therapy or doctoral education.

National Exam Rates

1. At least 80% of responders who sit for the national M.F.T. licensure examination will pass.

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

S.U.M.F.T. Alumni Survey/ S.U.M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

#2 Alumni Achievement: Graduated students will be successful in pursuing either a career in Marriage and Family Therapy or doctoral education.

M.F.T. Licensure Rates

2. At least 80% of responders who are interested in obtaining an M.F.T. license are successful in obtaining preliminary and or full licensure (appropriate to their state and location).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

S.U.M.F.T. Alumni Survey/ S.U.M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

#2 Alumni Achievement: Graduated students will be successful in pursuing either a career in Marriage and Family Therapy or doctoral education.

M.F.T. Employment Rates

3. At least 80% of responders, who are interested in M.F.T. or a related mental health position or in continued education, will successfully find employment in an M.F.T. or related position, or acceptance into a program for continuing education (i.e., Ph.D. Program).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

S.U.M.F.T. Alumni Survey/ S.U.M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

#3 Commitment to Diversity:  The S.U. M.F.T. program will show clear commitment to diversity through curriculum content and student composition.

Curriculum Diversity Content

1. At least 75% of our courses will have at least one diversity-oriented assignment.

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

P.D.

S.U.M.F.T. Diversity in Curriculum Tracking Sheet.

#3 Commitment to Diversity:  The S.U. M.F.T. program will show clear commitment to diversity through curriculum content and student composition.

Program Demographic Diversity

2.At least 40% of students and faculty in the department will self-identify with program-identified characteristics of a diverse population (gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, culture, environment, health/ability, nationality, religion, spirituality, and socio economic status) as reported on the Demographic Questionnaire, assessed yearly.

Yearly/ Dec Faculty Meet

Eval Faculty

S.U.M.F.T. Demographic Survey

Program Goals

Goal

Outcome

Variable

Benchmark

How often

Analyzed by: (Title)

Instrument

Program Goal #1 (Self-in-Systems)

To train family systems professionals who are informed by a Self in Systems perspective.

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate awareness and regulation of self in system.

Self in context

1.  At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Clinical Readiness Interview Rubric (specifically 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, 2b, and 2c), assessed at the end of student’s first fall semester of clinical practice (M.F.T. 750-Introduction to M.F.T. Practice (first class of the Practicum course series)) (assessed annually.

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Clinical Readiness Interview Rubric

 Program Goal #1 (Self-in-Systems)

To train family systems professionals who are informed by a Self in Systems perspective.

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate awareness and regulation of self in system.

Self in context

2.At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students (specifically 4a, 4b, 4g, 4i, 6a, 6b, 6c, and 6d), assessed at the end of each semester that the student is clinically active (Practicum course series).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students

Program Goal #2 (Diversity)

To prepare family systems professionals who are sensitive to, and engaged with social justice issues.

S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate engagement with cultural and contextual differences.

Engagement with differences

1:  At least 70% of students will receive a B or better on the final project in M.F.T. 684.

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

M.F.T. 684 Final Project Rubric

 Program Goal #2 (Diversity)

To prepare family systems professionals who are sensitive to, and engaged with social justice issues.

 S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate engagement with cultural and contextual differences.

Clinical Diversity Competency

2. At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students (specifically questions 4b, 4g, 6b and 6d which are associated with cultural and contextual engagement).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students

Program Goal #3 (Practice)

To prepare family systems professionals who are competent systems clinicians able to provide services across a variety of contexts.

S.L.O.#3:  Students will demonstrate M.F.T. clinical competency skills across a variety of contexts.

Clinical Competency

1.At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students (specifically 1a-f, 2a-e, 3a-d, 4c-f, and 4h), assessed at the end of each semester that the student is clinically active (Practicum course series).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students

Program Goal #4 (Ethics)

To prepare family systems professionals with knowledge and skills for M.F.T. legal and ethical analysis and decision-making.

S.L.O.#4: Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. legal and ethical guidelines and professional standards.

Ethical Competency

1. At least 70% of students will receive a B or better on the final project in M.F.T. 681 (Ethics- Personal and Professional Integration Paper).

Yearly/ Dec Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Ethics Integration Rubric

 Program Goal #4 (Ethics)

To prepare family systems professionals with knowledge and skills for M.F.T. legal and ethical analysis and decision-making.

S.L.O.#4: Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. legal and ethical guidelines and professional standards.

Ethical Competency

2. At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students (specifically 5a-d), assessed at the end of each semester that the student is clinically active (Practicum course series).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students

Program Goal #5 (Knowledge and Research)

To prepare family systems professionals with an educational foundation grounded in family systems theory and research informed practice.

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. historical, current, and research-informed theoretical information.

M.F.T. Theory Knowledge

1. At least 70% of students will receive a B or higher rating two family systems theory course exams (M.F.T. 671 and M.F.T. 682).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Theory Exams

Program Goal #5 (Knowledge and Research)

To prepare family systems professionals with an educational foundation grounded in family systems theory and research informed practice.

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate an applied knowledge of M.F.T. historical, current, and research-informed theoretical information.

M.F.T. Theory Application

1. At least 70% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students (specifically 1a and 4a), assessed at the end of each semester that the student is clinically active (Practicum course series).

Yearly/ April Faculty Meet

Evaluation Faculty

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Students

Appendix D: S.U. M.F.T. Ph.D. Evaluation Timeline

Ph.D. Program Outcomes

Program Outcomes (PO)

Variable

Benchmark

When

Instrument

P.O. #1. Student Achievement: Students will successfully complete the S.U. M.F.T. program requirements and graduate.

Graduation Rates

1. At least 60% of admitted students will graduate within five years of completing their qualifying exam.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

P.O. #2. Alumni Achievement: Graduated students will be successful in pursuing a career advancing Marriage and Family Therapy or related fields.

M.F.T. Employment Rates

1. At least 80% of responders will successfully find employment advancing M.F.T. or related field within 2 years of graduation.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. Alumni Survey/ S.U. M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

P.O. #3. Commitment to Diversity: The S.U. M.F.T. program will show clear commitment to diversity through curriculum content and student composition.

Curriculum Diversity Content

1. At least 75% of our courses will have at least one diversity-oriented assignment or have diversity topics integrated throughout the semester.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. Diversity in Curriculum Tracking Sheet.

P.O. #3. Commitment to Diversity: The S.U. M.F.T. program will show clear commitment to diversity through curriculum content and student composition.

Program Demographic Diversity

2. At least 40% of students and faculty in the department will self-identify with program-identified characteristics of a diverse population (gender, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, culture, environment, health/ability, nationality, religion, spirituality, and socio economic status).

Fall

S.U. M.F.T. Demographic Survey

P.O. #3. Commitment to Diversity: The S.U. M.F.T. program will show clear commitment to diversity through curriculum content and student composition.

Research on Diversity

3. At least 40% of dissertation research will focus on a diversity topic or a diversity related population.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

Ph.D. Student Learning Outcomes

Student Learning Outcomes (S.L.O.)

Variable

Benchmark

When

Instrument

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate competence in advanced theory and theory building.

Theory Building

1. At least 80% of students will pass their qualifying examination which articulates their theory of therapy.

Summer

Assessed by Qual Theory component. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T. D Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate competence in advanced theory and theory building.

Philosophy of Supervision

2. At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the M.F.T. 861 assignment in which they articulate their philosophy of supervision.

Summer

M.F.T. 861 Phil of Sup Assignment Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#1: Students will demonstrate competence in advanced theory and theory building.

Theory Building

3. At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the M.F.T. 865 assignment related to theory development including but not limited to Systems Theory, Family Development, and/or M.F.T. Clinical theory.

Fall

M.F.T. 865 Theory Dev Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate research competence.

Research Competence

1. At least 80% of students will pass the research portion of the qualifying examination.

Summer

Assessed by Qual Res component. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T.-D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate research competence.

Ethical Competence

2. At least 80% of students will demonstrate skills of ethical research and cultural sensitivity consistent with the Code of Ethics of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy as evident by completion of the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (C.I.T.I.) training before dissertation proposal approval.

Summer

C.I.T.I. Certificate. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T.-D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate research competence.

Research Dissemination

3. At least 80% of students will receive a B or higher on the M.F.T. 882 Evaluative Assignment in which they write a publishable paper regarding Marriage and Family Therapy outcome or process research.

Summer

M.F.T. 882 Evaluative Assignment. Traced on S.U. M.F.T.-D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#2: Students will demonstrate research competence.

Research Competence

4. At least 80% of students will attend at least one research seminar and/or training workshop while in residence.

Summer

Attendance Confirmation. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T.-D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#3 Students will demonstrate supervisory competence.

Supervisor Competence

1. At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in M.F.T. 861 (Supervision of Therapy) course.

Fall

M.F.T. 861 Phil of Sup Course Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#3 Students will demonstrate supervisory competence.

Supervisor Competence

2. At least 80% of students will provide 18 hours of supervision to master level M.F.T. students.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. D Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#3 Students will demonstrate supervisory competence.

Supervisor Competence

3. At least 80% of students will maintain an A.A.M.F.T. membership.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. D Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#4: Students will demonstrate professional teaching competence.

Teaching Effectiveness

1. At least 80% of students will pass the oral examination of their qualifying exam which assesses their ability to teach theoretical constructs.

Summer

Assessed by Qual Teach component. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T.-D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#4: Students will demonstrate professional teaching competence.

Teaching Effectiveness

2. At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in the teaching assignment for M.F.T. 865.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#4: Students will demonstrate professional teaching competence.

Teaching Effectiveness

3. At least 80% of students will be the presenter for at least one poster, paper, and/or workshop at a professional meeting while in residence.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. D. Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate clinical competence.

Clinical Competence

1. At least 80% of students will complete 1,000 clinical hours with 200 hours of supervision by an A.A.M.F.T. Approved Supervisor or equivalent by graduation.

Summer

Clinical Hours Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate clinical competence.

Clinical Competence

2. At least 80% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by supervisor

Each Semester

Eval Form of Student

S.L.O.#5: Students will demonstrate clinical competence.

Ethical Competence

3. Students will demonstrate skills of ethical practice and cultural sensitivity consistent with the Code of Ethics of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy as evidenced by at least 80% of students will receive a 3 or higher rating on the Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor (See Appendix F: Evaluation Form of Student completed by Supervisor) (specifically 4a, 4b, 4g, 4i, 5a-d 6a, 6b, 6c, and 6d), assessed each semester.

Each Semester

Eval Form of Student (Ethics)

S.L.O.#6: Students will demonstrate awareness and engagement with cultural and contextual differences.

Quals Cultural Engagement

1. At least 80% of students will pass the cultural awareness portion of the qualifying examination.

Summer

Assessed by Qual Cultural component. Tracked on S.U. M.F.T.-D Student Tracking Sheet

S.L.O.#6: Students will demonstrate awareness and engagement with cultural and contextual differences.

Cultural Competence

2. At least 80% of students will receive a B or better in the Cultural Diversity assignment for M.F.T. 865.

Summer

M.F.T. 875 Cultural Diversity Assignment Tracking Sheet

Faculty Outcomes

Faculty Outcomes (F.O.)

Variables

Benchmarks

When

Instrument

F.O.#1. Faculty will meet Syracuse University expectations for research, teaching, scholarship, and service.

S.U. Faculty Expectations

1. Completion of yearly Curriculum Vitae Update Form and successful review by the Dean’s office.

Spring

Curriculum Vitea Update Form

F.O.#2. Faculty will contribute to students’ successful completion of program requirements through effective teaching, advising/mentoring and supervision.

Teaching Effectiveness

1. At least 80% of instructors will receive an average score of 3 or higher on the Evaluation Form of Instructor completed by Students (See Appendix I: Evaluation Form of Instructor completed by Students), assessed each semester.

Summer

Evaluation Form of Instructor

F.O.#2. Faculty will contribute to students’ successful completion of program requirements through effective teaching, advising/mentoring and supervision.

Supervisory Effectiveness

2.At least 80% of supervisors will receive an average score of 3 or higher on the Evaluation Form of Supervisor completed by Supervisee, assessed each semester.

Summer

Evaluation Form of Supervisor

F.O.#2. Faculty will contribute to students’ successful completion of program requirements through effective teaching, advising/mentoring and supervision.

Mentoring Effectiveness

3.At least 80% of advisor mentors will advise dissertation research to completion.

Summer

S.U. M.F.T. Student Tracking Sheet

Appendix E: Master’s Degree Plan Information

Master's Degree Plan Template

Name: add name

Date: add date

Semester

2019-2020 Class Information

Credits

2020-2021 Class Information

Credits

2021-2022 Class Information

Credits

Fall

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

Spring

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

Summer MM

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

Summer S-I

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

Summer S- II

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

add classes here

add credits here

Sub Total

 -

add subtotal of credits here

 -

add subtotal of credits here

 -

add subtotal of credits here

Total

 -

add total credits here

 -

add total credits for both years here

 -

add total credits for all years here


Transfer Credits:

add transfer courses and credits

Sample Full-time Master's Degree Plan

Semester2019-20Credits2020-2021Credit
Fall

M.F.T. 671 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 661 Practice I (3 credits)

M.F.T. 681 Ethics (3 credits)

M.F.T. 750 Practicum (3 credits)

12

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology (3 credits)

M.F.T. 663 Research Methods (3 credits)

M.F.T. 762 Practicum 3 (3 credits)

9
Spring

M.F.T. 682 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 662 Practice II (3 credits)

M.F.T. 684 Diversity (3 credits)

M.F.T. 760 Practicum 1 (3 credits)

12

M.F.T. 781 Alcohol and Drugs (AOD) (3 credits)

M.F.T. 668 Family Life Cycle (3 credits)

Master’s Project

M.F.T. 763 Practicum 4 (3 credits)

9
Summer MMElective 13no classesno credits

Summer S-I

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues (3 credits)

Elective 2 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 761 Practicum 2 (3 credits)

 9

no classes

no credits


Summer S- II

M.F.T. 672 Couples Therapy (3 credits)

Elective 3 (3 credits)

 6

no classes

no credits

Sub Total

 -

 42

-

 18

Total

-42-60

M.F.T. Master's Degree Plan with Trauma C.A.S.

Semester2019-20Credits2020-2021Credit
Fall

M.F.T. 671 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 661 Practice (3 credits)

M.F.T. 681 Ethics (3 credits)

M.F.T. 750 Practicum (3 credits)

12

M.F.T. 603 Intro to Trauma 3 (Elective 2) *

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology (3 credits) *

M.F.T. 663 Research Methods (3 credits)

M.F.T. 762 Practicum 3 (3 credits)

12
Spring

M.F.T. 682 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 662 Practice (3 credits)

M.F.T. 684 Diversity (3 credits)

M.F.T. 760 Practicum 1 (3 credits)

12

M.F.T. 781 A.O.D. (3 credits)

M.F.T. 688 Family Life Cycles (3 credits) *

S.W.K. 740 Ind treatment of trauma (3 credits) (Elective 3) *

M.F.T. 763 Practicum 4 (3 credits)

12
Summer MM

M.F.T. 643 Trauma with children/families (1 elective) *

3no classesno credits
Summer S-I

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues (3 credits)

M.F.T. 761 Practicum 2 (3 credits)

6no classesno credits
Summer S- II

M.F.T. 672 Couples therapy

3no classesno credits
Sub Total-36-24
Total-36-60

*C.A.S. Courses

Required (3 of 4 from M.F.T. 603, M.F.T. 643, S.W.K. 704, S.W.K. 700), Plus 2 approved electives

Transfer 3 credits from M.F.T. for H.T.W. 607

M.F.T. Master's Degree Plan with Early Start (Spring Admit)

Semester2019-20Credits2020-2021Credits2021-2022Credits
Fallno classesno credits

M.F.T. 671 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 661 Practice 1 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 750 Practicum (3 credits)

9

M.F.T. 681 Ethics (3 credits)

Elective 3 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 762 Practicum 3 (3 credits)

9
Spring

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology (3 credits)

M.F.T. 781 A.O.D. (3 credits)

M.F.T. 663 Research (3 credits)

9

M.F.T. 682 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 662 Practice 2 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 760 Practicum 1 (3 credits)

9

M.F.T. 684 Diversity (3 credits)

M.F.T. 688 Family Life Cycle (3 credits)

M.F.T. 763 Practicum 4 (3 credits)

9
Summer MMno classesno creditsno classesno creditsno classesno credits
Summer S-I

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues

3

Elective 1 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 761 Practicum 2 (3 credits)

6no classesno credits
Summer S- IIM.F.T. 672 Couples Therapy3Elective 23no classesno credits
Sub Total -15-27-18
Total -15-42-60

Part-time Master's Degree Plan (Sample)

Semester2019-20Credits2020-2021Credits2021-2022Credits
Fall

M.F.T. 671 Theory (3 Credits)

M.F.T. 681 Ethics (3 credits)

6

M.F.T. 661 Practice 1 (3 credits)

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology (3 credits)

M.F.T. 750 Practicum (3 credits)

9

M.F.T. 663 Research (3 credits)

M.F.T. 762 Practicum 3 (3 credits)

6
Spring

M.F.T. 682 Theory (3 credits)

M.F.T. 684 Diversity (3 credits)

6

M.F.T. 662 Practice 2(3 credits)

M.F.T. 781 Alcohol and Drugs (AOD) (3 credits)

M.F.T. 760 Practicum 1 (3 credits)

9

M.F.T. 688 Family Life Cycle (3 credits)

M.F.T. 763 Practicum 4 (3 credits)

6
Summer MMElective 13Elective 23no classesno credits
Summer S-Ino classesno credits

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues (3 credits)

M.F.T. 761 2 Practicum (3 credits)

6no classesno credits
Summer S- IIno classesno credits

M.F.T. 672 Couples Therapy (3 credits)

Elective 3 (3 credits)

6no classesno credits
Sub Total -15-33-12
Total -15-48-60

M.F.T. Master's Degree Plan Checklist

Record Semester Took

Required Courses

Credits

add a semester here

M.F.T. 671 Theory

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 661 Practice I

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 681 Ethics

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 750 Intro to Clinical Practice

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 682 Theory

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 662 Practice II

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 684 Diversity

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 567 Sexual Issues

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 672 Couples Therapy

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 724 Psychopathology

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 663 Research Methods

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 781 Alcohol and Drugs

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 668 Family Life Cycle

3

add a semester here

Master’s Project

0

add a semester here

M.F.T. 760 – Practicum 1

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 761 Practicum 2

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 762 Practicum 3

3

add a semester here

M.F.T. 763 Practicum 4

3

add a semester here

Elective 1 *

3

add a semester here

Elective 2 *

3

add a semester here

Elective 3 *

3

-

Total

60

* Electives you an take include M.F.T. 686 – Play Therapy (3 credits), M.F.T. 687 – Spirituality in Therapy (3 credits), M.F.T. 642 – L.G.B.T. Issues in Therapy (3 credits), M.F.T. 643 – Trauma (3 credits), Others by Petition

Degree Plan Notes: add comments

Transfer Credits: add transfer courses and credits

Non-matriculated Courses, pre-admission: add courses and credits

Other Issues Related to the Degree Plan: add comments

Appendix F: Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Student

Marriage and Family Therapy Practicum

Competency Based Clinical Evaluation of Student completed by Supervisor

Please complete this form on the student listed

Student Name: add student name

Supervisor’s Name: add supervisor name

Agency: add agency name

Period of Supervision: add supervision dates

Evaluation of A.A.M.F.T. Core Competencies:

Please use the following rating scale to evaluate students in the areas of competence below:

  1. Demonstrates skills far below expected for a student at this developmental level
  2. Demonstrates skills below expected for a student at this developmental level
  3. Demonstrates skills at the level expected for a student at this developmental level
  4. Demonstrates skills above expected for student at this developmental level
  5. Demonstrates skills far above expected for a student at this developmental level

Domain 1: Admission to Treatment

Domain Number

Competency

Criteria

Rating

1.1.2

Understand theories and techniques of individual, marital, couple, family, and group psychotherapy.

Can the student discuss theory, articulate which theory they might apply to a case? Do they use systemic questions?

add rating here

1.3.5

Obtain consent to treatment from all responsible persons.

Has all the Intake paperwork and appropriate consents been signed? Does the student ensure there is a release before talking with others?

add rating here

1.3.6

Establish and maintain appropriate and productive therapeutic alliances with the clients.

Has the therapist been able to engage with clients? Do they come back?

add rating here

1.3.7

Solicit and use client feedback throughout the therapeutic process.

Does the therapist ask the client about goals, session progress, specific feedback?

add rating here

1.3.9

Manage session interactions with individuals, couples, families, and groups.

Does the therapist start and end on time? Have clients talk with each other? Facilitate discussion, manage conflict?

add rating here

1.5.2

Complete case documentation in a timely manner and in accordance with relevant laws and policies.

Session notes done within 48 hours.  Treatment plans within 4 sessions, updated as needed.

add rating here

Comments:  

add comments

Domain 2: Clinical Assessment and Diagnosis

Domain NumberCompetencyCriteriaRating
2.3.3Apply effective and systemic interviewing techniques and strategiesIncluded all members attending? Use circular questions? Focus on systemic concerns & use systemic interventions?add rating here
2.3.5Screen and develop adequate safety plans for substance abuse, child and elder maltreatment, domestic violence, physical violence, suicide potential, and dangerousness to self and other.Does the student recognize areas of risk? Do they seek assistance? Develop plan with the client?add rating here
2.3.6Assess family history and dynamics using a genogram or other assessment instruments.Are they assessing the system/family/relationship? Do they use genogram, observation, tasks, other tools? Do they review the client assessment?add rating here
2.3.8Identify clients' strengths, resilience, and resources.Do they include strengths when discussing case, build on them in session?add rating here
2.5.1Utilize consultation and supervision effectively.Do they come to supervision regularly? Do they ask for assistance with cases? Show their work openly?add rating here

Comments:

add comments

Domain 3: Treatment Planning and Case Management

Domain Number

Competency

Criteria

Rating

3.3.5

Manage progression of therapy toward treatment goals.

Are they focused on goals? Can they articulate what they are working on? Do they note progress?

add rating here

3.3.6

Manage risks, crises, and emergencies.

Do they identify areas of risk? Are they calm when sessions are intense, client are in crises? Do they seek appropriate assistance in emergencies?

add rating here

3.5.3

Write plans and complete other case documentation in accordance with practice setting policies, professional standards, and state/provincial laws.

Have they completed a treatment plan? Are notes done on time?

add rating here

3.5.4

Utilize time management skills in therapy sessions and other professional meetings.

Are they on time for sessions? Do they end sessions on time? Are they on time for supervision?

add rating here

Comments: 

add comments

Domain 4: Therapeutic Interventions

Domain Number

Competency

Criteria

Rating

4.1.1

Comprehend a variety of individual and systemic therapeutic models and their application, including evidence-based therapies and culturally sensitive approaches.

Does theory inform their practice, conceptualization, interventions? Can they articulate what they do in session and why?

add rating here

4.3.2

Deliver interventions in a way that is sensitive to special needs of clients (e.g., gender, age, socioeconomic status, culture/race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, health/ ability, personal history, SES, larger systems issues of the client).

Do they tend to issues of diversity, account for it in the room, in the therapeutic relationship?

add rating here

4.3.5

Engage each family member in the treatment process as appropriate.

Do they utilize family members/ partners? Do they conduct relational sessions and develop systemic goals?

add rating here

4.3.6

Facilitate clients developing and integrating solutions to problems.

Do they ask clients about goals, what they want to see changed, what is working?

add rating here

4.3.7

Defuse intense and chaotic situations to enhance the safety of all participants.

Are they able to contain chaos & stay calm? Can they interrupt escalations effectively?

add rating here

4.3.12

Integrate supervisor/team communications into treatment.

Are suggestions and requests acted upon?

add rating here

4.5.1

Respect multiple perspectives (e.g., clients, team, supervisor, practitioners from other disciplines who are involved in the case).

Can they listen to other perspectives and be open to new ideas? Are such discussions productive?

add rating here

4.5.2

Set appropriate boundaries, manage issues of triangulation, and develop collaborative working relationships.

Does the therapist maintain professional boundaries (ex. refrain from using personal numbers, emails). Are they able to work with all members of the system (client and larger system) collaboratively and professionally?

add rating here

4.5.3

Articulate rationales for interventions related to treatment goals and plan, assessment information, and systemic understanding of clients’ context and dynamics.

Can they explain what they do and why? Does the therapist follow a plan?

add rating here

Comments:

add comments

Domain 5: Legal Issues, Ethics, and Standards

Domain Number

Competency

Criteria

Rating

5.3.1

Monitor issues related to ethics, laws, regulations, and professional standards.

Do they follow policy of Center (ex. paperwork deadlines, response to messages, maintaining appointments)? Do they obtain consent?  Seek consultation for cases that are challenging or beyond the scope of the Center?

add rating here

5.3.3

Inform clients and legal guardian of limitations to confidentiality and parameters of mandatory reporting.

Is this reviewed thoroughly at the beginning of the case? With all new members that join the therapy?

add rating here

5.3.4

Develop safety plans for clients who present with potential self-harm, suicide, abuse, or violence.

Does the student create a safety plan when risk is noted?

add rating here

5.5.1

Maintain client records with timely and accurate notes.

Are notes complete? On time? Accurately reflect the session?

add rating here

Comments:

add comments

Awareness of Self

Domain Number

Awareness of Self

Criteria

Rating

3.4.5

Monitor personal reactions to clients and treatment process, especially in terms of therapeutic behavior, relationship with clients, process for explaining procedures, and outcomes.

Does the student process reactions in supervision? Are they open to discussing the way the self impacts their therapeutic relationships & clinical work?

add rating here

5.2.4

Recognize when clinical supervision or consultation is necessary.

Does the student present cases that are challenging? Are they open to feedback? Are they able to ask for assistance?

add rating here

5.4.2

Monitor attitudes, personal well-being, personal issues, and personal problems to insure they do not impact the therapy process adversely or create vulnerability for misconduct.

Can the student discuss their personal issues, beliefs & attitudes as they relate to clinical work? Are they open to & incorporate feedback?

add rating here

5.5.2

Consult with peers and/or supervisors if personal issues, attitudes, or beliefs threaten to adversely impact clinical work.

Does the student share relevant issues in supervision? Are they open to getting assistance and working on areas of concern?

add rating here

Comments:

add comments

Areas of Strength:

add comments about areas of strength

Areas for Future Growth:

add comments about areas for growth

Plan to address competency areas needing improvement (rated 1or 2)

** If there is a “2”, half letter grade less

** If there is a “1” it is a full letter grade less

The grade I assign this student, based on his/her work under my supervision, is _______.

I expect this student to continue to work with me until__________.

Supervisor’s Signature:

Date:

Student’s Signature:

Date:

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