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Welcome

Dear BSSW Student,

Welcome to the baccalaureate program of the School of Social Work. We are pleased that you chose to study with us, and we look forward to working with you to achieve your academic and professional goals. We hope that working toward these goals will be both exciting and challenging for you. 

You have the primary responsibility for planning your academic program and making certain that your program fulfills degree requirements. To support that, you will use information, suggestions and guidance from your faculty advisor and other faculty, ideas from fellow students, and a clear understanding of the policies and procedures of the University, the College, and the School of Social Work. You will also need to familiarize yourself with MySlice as the University portal for enrollment and progress monitoring and to check your syr.edu Inbox regularly for important announcements, opportunities, and deadlines.

We have prepared this handbook to help you understand how we work. The handbook contains information on the policies and procedures of the School of Social Work and refers you to the applicable policies of the College and University. It is intended to complement the Syracuse University 2019-2020 Student Handbook. Our policies and procedures are built upon the general rules and regulations of the University. These are presented in the document Academic Rules and Regulations, included at the front of the Undergraduate Course Catalog. Please review them as you begin your degree program.

This handbook also describes the basic characteristics of the BSSW degree program and the resources available to support your educational experience. 

Have a great year and, when in doubt, please ask questions so that you have the information you need to complete your course of study successfully. Again, welcome aboard! 

Sincerely, 

 

Keith A. Alford, Ph.D., A.C.S.W. 
Director, School of Social Work 

Karen E. Kirkhart, PhD, MSW 
Baccalaureate Program Director, Professor

Introduction

The School of Social Work offers educational programs leading to the Bachelor of Science in Social Work and the Master of Social Work degrees. The School is fully accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. Both the BSSW and MSW programs of the School of Social Work are offered in collaboration with participating human service agencies across Central New York (CNY) that provide professional internship settings. These agency collaborations are vital to the field instruction programs of the School. 

Structure. The Director is the chief administrator in the School of Social Work, responsible for all budgetary, personnel, and programmatic operations of the School, in collaboration with the appropriate College and University officers. The Baccalaureate Program Director is responsible for the implementation of the undergraduate social work degree program. The Director of Field Instruction oversees the field placement process for students in both the graduate and undergraduate programs, assisted by a team of Internship Coordinators. 

The School of Social Work is one of six units within the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. The Director of the School of Social Work reports to the Dean of the College, and the faculty of the School of Social Work are also faculty in the College. Some of the services utilized by undergraduate students are provided centrally by the College or the University. For other aspects of the undergraduate experience, faculty and staff within the School of Social Work are the primary resources. The Social Work faculty and professional staff are responsible for the development, delivery, and continuous evaluation of the BSSW curriculum. 

Your Learning Journey. The BSSW Program is designed to develop essential abilities that you will need as a professional social worker and as a citizen of the University and beyond. See Appendix A to preview these Essential Abilities.

Student Engagement. Students are encouraged to participate in the operation of the BSSW Program through representation on the BSSW Program Committee and other selected standing committees of the School of Social Work. The major standing committees of the School of Social Work are the Administrative Committee, the Assessment Committee, the Promotion and Tenure Committee, the Faculty Recruitment Committee, and the BSSW and MSW Program committees.

There are two student organizations within the School of Social Work. First, Social Workers United (SWU) is a local social work student organization. It is designed to promote student interaction, build relationships, create service opportunities, and foster student engagement among BSSW students and between BSSW and MSW students. Second, The Zeta Gamma Chapter of the national Phi Alpha Honor Society for Social Work is an organization of both graduate and undergraduate students. The purpose of Phi Alpha Honor Society is to provide a closer bond among students of social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals. Phi Alpha fosters high standards of education for social workers and invites into membership those who have attained excellence in scholarship and achievement in social work. 

Students are inducted into the Zeta Gamma Chapter of Phi Alpha Honor Society at Syracuse University each Spring. BSSW students qualify by achieving a cumulative GPA that places them in the top 35% of social work majors who have completed at least 37.5% of their degree program. See Appendix B for more information on our Phi Alpha chapter.

About our Location. The main office of the School of Social Work is located in Suite 244 on the second floor of White Hall in the Falk Complex. During the academic year, offices are open from 8:30am until 5:00pm, Monday through Friday. You can leave messages or mail for faculty members with our Office Coordinator, Karen Goebel, at the reception desk. Contact information for individual faculty may be easily located through the University’s Online Directory.

The Falk Complex consists of two buildings, White Hall and MacNaughton Hall. White Hall has five floors and MacNaughton Hall has four floors; however, floors one and two of the buildings connect seamlessly. White Hall is named for Ernest I. White, a lawyer who served as president of The Post-Standard. A 1997 expansion project included renovations to White Hall as part of the $12.5 million budget when MacNaughton Hall was added to the north. White Hall’s campus location is north of the Carrier Dome, west of Heroy Geology Building and south of Crouse College. Made of reinforced concrete with brick facing and limestone trim, it was begun by architect Lorimer Rich and Associates, and completed by King & King Architects.

School of Social Work Faculty and Staff

Faculty and professional staff of the School of Social Work are here to support you! Visit the Falk College School of Social Work Online Directory for a current listing of staff and their contact information.

BSSW Program

Program Goals

The goals of the Syracuse University BSSW program are to:

  • Prepare undergraduate students for competent, effective and evidence-based generalist practice that builds on and recognizes strengths and vulnerabilities of individuals, families, groups and communities;
  • Prepare undergraduate students to work effectively in increasingly complex culturally, linguistically, racially, socially, ability, and gender diverse communities;
  • Prepare undergraduate students to be life-long learners, including those who go on to further graduate education;
  • Enhance the well-being of individuals, families and communities through a vibrant and innovative generalist field education program;
  • Advance social work knowledge through research, scholarship and evaluation of interventions and policies that strengthen social work practice, address human need and promote social and economic justice;
  • Enrich the intellectual climate of the School, College and University.
  • Strengthen agencies and advance social and economic justice through membership on the boards of directors, engagement in policy advocacy, involvement and leadership in professional organizations and other forms of faculty service.

These goals reflect both the priorities of the larger University and the specific values of the social work profession. They involve both faculty and students. Note the connections that these goals imply. Faculty and field instruction staff will connect with you to impart knowledge and skills, examine values, and develop a critical stance toward evaluating and using information. You will reciprocate by educating faculty and peers based upon your experiences, knowledge and values. Collectively, our conversations deepen our awareness and understandings and elevate the intellectual climate of our program. You are a key part of this goal!

CSWE Competencies

Our BSSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE). The oversight of this professional accrediting body insures that our program is delivered with high standards and that you will receive quality education to achieve nine core competencies:

  1. Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior
  2. Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice
  3. Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice
  4. Engage in Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice
  5. Engage in Policy Practice
  6. Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities
  7. Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities
  8. Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities
  9. Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations and Communities

Each of these nine competencies is described in Appendix C.

Full-Time Study for the Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) Degree

The undergraduate program of the School of Social Work offers a Bachelor of Science degree.

Degree Requirements

The BSSW requires completion of 120 credit hours. One-half of the work must be in the liberal arts and sciences. Full-time students typically complete the BSSW degree in four academic years, with an average course load of 15 credits (5 courses) per semester. Students may elect to take summer courses to lighten their load during the academic year. Academic credit is not awarded for life or work experience achieved prior to matriculation in the BSSW Program.

Consistent with the Liberal Arts Core of the College of Arts and Sciences, requirements are distributed as follows:

RequirementCredits
Liberal Skills Requirements

12-14 credits

Divisional Perspective Requirements43 credits
Social Work Requirements
(includes 12 credits of Critical Reflections on Ethical and Social Issues)
42 credits
Electives (may also be used to complete a minor)To reach a total of 120 credits

Liberal Skills Requirements (12-14 credits)

To satisfy the Liberal skills requirement in the School of Social Work, students are required to:

  1. Achieve proficiency in writing by taking WRT 105, WRT 205, and course that is approved as writing intensive.

  2. Achieve proficiency in the use of quantitative methods to understand and solve problems by successfully taking MAT 121 and MAT 122 or MAT 221 and MAT 222 (6-8 credits)

Divisional Perspective Requirements (43 credits) 

The Divisional Perspective Requirements for social work students involve successfully completing courses in the Humanities, Social Sciences and Natural Sciences divisions.

Humanities (12 credits)

To satisfy the Divisional Perspective Requirement for Humanities, students are required to take four (4) courses in the Humanities Division (12 credits)

Natural Science (7 credits)

To satisfy the Divisional Perspective Requirement for Natural Science, students are required to take:

  • BIO 121 – General Biology I      (4 credits, including a 1-credit lab)
  • AND a second science, selected from one of the following 3-credit courses:
    • BIO 123 – General Biology II
    • PSY 223 – Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience
    • PSY 315 – Drugs and Human Behavior
    • PSY 395 – Abnormal Psychology
    • NSD225 – Nutrition in Health
    • ANT131 – Introduction to Biological Anthropology

Social Sciences (24 credits)

To satisfy the Divisional Perspective Requirement for Natural Science, students are required to take:

  • 1 of the following:
    • AAS 112 – Introduction to African American Studies 
    • ANT 121 – Peoples and Culture of the World
  • 1 of the following:
    • ECN 101 – Introduction to Microeconomics
    • ECN 102 – Introduction to Macroeconomics
    • ECN 203 – Economic Ideas and issues
  • ECN 258 – Poverty and Discrimination in America
  • 1 of the following:
    • PSC 121 – American National Government and Politics
    • PSC 122 – American State and Local Government and Politics
  • PSY 205 – Foundations of Human Behavior
  • PSY 274 – Social Psychology
  • 1 of the following:
    • PSY 335 – Psychology of Childhood
    • PSY 336 – Psychology of the Adolescent
    • HFS 202 – Development of Children
  • 1 of the following:
    • PSY 337 – Psychology of Adult Life: Maturity and Old Age
    • SWK 357 – Processes of Aging
    • HFS 363 – Midlife Development and Gerontology
  • 1 of the following:
    • SOC 101 – Introduction to Sociology
    • SOC 102 – Social Problems

Social Work (42 credits)

SWK 201 – Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory I

SWK 202 – Social Work Practice Skills laboratory II

SWK 301 – Foundations of Social Work Practice

SWK 314 – Social Welfare policy and Services I

SWK 315 – Social Welfare policy and Services II

SWK 326 – Persons in Social Context

SWK 328 – Human Diversity in Social Contexts

SWK 361 – Foundations of Social Work Research

SWK 401 – Strategies of Social Work Intervention I

SWK 402 – Strategies of Social Work Intervention II

SWK 435 – Field Practicum I

SWK 436 – Field Seminar I

SWK 445 – Field Practicum II

SWK 446 – Field Seminar II

Course descriptions can be found in the Undergraduate Course Catalog.

Electives (to total 120 credits)

Students who are interested in exploring social work as a profession may enroll in SWK 115 – Introduction to Social Work, which gives you a broad overview of the variety of opportunities and career paths that begin with a BSSW degree.

Use your electives to take advantage of a wealth of learning opportunities to enrich your education here at Syracuse University:

  • Explore another culture to extend your learning through Study Abroad. Syracuse University has one of the most highly ranked study abroad programs in the nation. You can choose from over 100 different programs in 60 countries. Options include classroom-based courses, internships, Signature Seminars, and community engagement projects.
  • Participate in the Renée Crown University Honors Program. Designed for exceptionally curious and motivated students, Honors provides special opportunities and mentoring to enrich your academic experience. This All-University Honors Program admits a small number of incoming first-year students each fall; however, students are also welcome to apply after the first and second semester. 
  • Develop a competency in a foreign language. While there is no formal language requirement beyond the Humanities, which includes foreign languages, competency in multiple languages is a valued skill. Being multilingual will enhance your social work practice and make you more competitive on the job market.

Develop a minor program of study within or outside of Falk College or pursue a second major. (See double majors.)

Part-Time Study for the Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW) Degree

Students for whom full-time study is not a good fit may choose to study part-time through University College to complete their BSSW. The degree requirements are the same, but students may opt to take either two or three courses, up to a maximum of 11 credits, each semester. University College reserves seats for part-time students in their evening courses to accommodate students who work in the daytime.
To support part-time completion of the BSSW, required social work courses are offered in the evening on a three-year rotating cycle:

YearFallSpring
Year 1SWK 201
SWK 326
SWK 202
SWK 328
Year 2SWK 314
SWK 301
SWK 315
SWK 361
Year 3SWK 401
SWK 435
SWK 436
SWK 402
SWK 445
SWK 446

Transfer Credit

 Transfer credit from other institutions may be accepted with course grades of C or better. A maximum of 66 credits can be transferred from a two-year program. A maximum of 90 credits can be transferred from a four-year program. At least 30 credit hours must be completed at Syracuse University to receive a Syracuse University degree. Policy governing the acceptance of transfer credit is further explained in Appendix D.

Field Instruction

Opportunities for field learning are presented throughout the curriculum of the BSSW. They culminate in the senior social work practicum (SWK 435 and SWK 445) and its related field seminars (SWK 436 and SWK 446) in the senior year. The practicum is a two-semester agency placement requiring consecutive fall and spring semester registration. You will be in placement in the same field instruction setting the equivalent of two working days each week, for which you earn five academic credits per semester. In addition, you will meet in a campus-based field seminar for approximately one hour and twenty minutes per week, for which you earn one credit per semester. This seminar provides a forum for integration of theory and practice through cognitive examination of actual field experiences.

This practicum is a very important part of your professional preparation. The selection of an appropriate placement for you requires careful planning with the School and the agency and requires that you be an active participant. The policies and procedures that are related to field instruction will help you understand how to work with us regarding placements. The baccalaureate field instruction program is coordinated through the Office of Field Instruction. You will be assigned to a placement coordinator early in the spring of your junior year.

Eligibility for Registration in SWK 435 and SWK 436

Social Work students are eligible to register for SWK 435 - Field Practicum I and SWK 436 - Field Seminar I, when the following conditions are met:

  1. The student has been admitted to the School of Social Work as a candidate for the BSSW.
  2. The student has completed prerequisite social work practice courses (SWK 201 - Social Work Skills Lab I, SWK 202 - Social Work Skills Lab II, SWK 301 – Foundations of Social Work Practice), and SWK 328 – Human Diversity.
  3. The student is within 45 credit hours of completing the BSSW degree (having completed 75 credits) and is registering for a fall-spring sequence which includes SWK 435 Field Instruction I, SWK 436 Field Seminar I, and SWK 401 Strategies of Social Work Intervention I in the Fall Semester, and SWK 445 Field Instruction II, SWK 446 Field Seminar II, and SWK 402 Strategies of Social Work Intervention II in the Spring Semester. Additionally, part-time students must have senior status and will complete the degree program within two semesters of completing the field work experience.
  4. The student has a 2.5 GPA in the required Social Work courses.
  5. The student has electronically submitted a current résumé and the online BSSW "Application for Field Instruction Placement" that is available on the School of Social Work website under field instruction.
  6. The student is not on academic probation. A social work student will not be permitted to register either for SWK 435-436 or SWK 445-446 while on academic probation.

Exceptions require prior approval by the Director of Field Instruction and the Director of the Undergraduate Program.

Placement Procedures

The selection of an appropriate placement requires personal reflection and a collaborative planning process. For details concerning the placement process and specific information about Field Instruction, supervision, and evaluation, please see the BSSW Field Instruction Manual.

Admissions

All undergraduate admissions are made through the Admissions Office of the University. Some schools and colleges, including the School of Social Work, have special admission requirements.

The academic policies and procedures of the School of Social Work are designed to help you make an informed and purposeful decision to pursue academic study and a career in social work. This requires an opportunity to learn about social work and to gain direct contact with social work agencies. First- year students may take SWK 115 - Introduction to Social Work (an elective), to gain an overview of the nature of the social work profession and the services it provides. They visit local social work agencies in the Syracuse community. This course supports informed decision-making in choosing social work as a major.

Admissions Standards

Undergraduate students in the BSSW program are formally admitted to the major in the second semester sophomore year. Because courses restricted to Social Work majors do not start until second semester sophomore year with SWK 202 – Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory II, we require that every student in the program complete a Statement of Intent to Major form during that course. No student may advance beyond SWK 202 without an approved Statement of Intent to Major.

The admissions standards for the School of Social Work are:

  1. New Students (First-year & External Transfers):
    1. Admission to Syracuse University.
    2. Satisfactory completion of SWK 201-Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory I
    3. Completion of Intent to Major form (Appendix E), approved by the BSSW Director.
  2. Intra-University Transfer Students:
    1. Cumulative GPA of at least 2.5
    2. A personal interview with the Director of the Undergraduate Program
    3. Completed Intra-University transfer form, available online or from the BSSW Director (White 244) or the College Recorder (MacNaughton 300).
    4. Completion of Intent to Major form (Appendix E), approved by the BSSW Director.

Part-time students are admitted to the baccalaureate social work program by the Director of the Undergraduate Program, in conjunction with officials at University College (UC). Admission policies and procedures are consistent across all candidates for the BSSW.

Students are expected to understand and act in accordance with values and principles set forth in the NASW Code of Ethics (Appendix F) and listed in the Intent to Major form (Appendix E). This form must be completed prior to completion of SWK 202, Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory II, and the first required social work course restricted to social work majors. Transfer students who have already completed SWK 202 (through equivalent credit taken elsewhere) will be asked to complete the form as soon as possible after entering the program. This form will be placed in the student’s file in the school and a copy given to the student’s social work faculty advisor. If the student does not want to declare his or her intent to major in social work or the student’s responses suggest that social work might be a poor professional fit, the Director of the Undergraduate Program and/or the student’s advisor will speak with the student about alternative majors and career choices.

Academic credit is not awarded for life or work experience achieved prior to matriculation in the BSSW program.

Social Justice Minor

If you begin your BSSW program and decide that it is not the major that you want, you may still pursue a minor in Social Justice. This minor is available to students who are NOT social work majors but who want to infuse their chosen majors with social work values, skills, and knowledge. Social justice concerns the fundamental human rights of members of a society regardless of position. Social justice is concerned with issues of equity and inclusion in the distribution of wealth, opportunities, privileges and resources. It addresses distributions of power at both individual and systems levels, inclusive of economic and environmental justice. It includes global concerns for the well-being of our planet. It addresses methods for combatting oppression based on multiple axes of identity, including age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, language, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. The Social Justice minor prepares students to grapple with these crucial issues, and engage in action to build a more just and equitable society.

Course options in this minor enrich students’ major areas of study by emphasizing:

  • ethical and professional behavior,
  • cultural diversity and difference,
  • human rights and social, economic, and environmental justice,
  • research that informs and is informed by practice,
  • policy practice

The Social Justice Minor program requires the completion of 18 credits. To declare a minor, students must have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5 and submit a Declaration of Minor form to the Director of the Baccalaureate Social Work Program, their faculty advisors, and the dean’s office of their home colleges. A limit of 3 transfer credits may be applied with permission. 

Required Courses (3 credits)

One of two core courses is required:

  • SWK 115 – Introduction to Social Work
  • SWK 201 – Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory I

If both core courses are taken, SWK 115 must precede SWK 201.

Elective Courses (12-15 credits)

Students may choose from the following options:

  • SWK 314 – Social Welfare Policy and Services I
  • SWK 315 – Social Welfare Policy and Services II
  • SWK 326 – Persons in Social Context
  • SWK 328 – Human Diversity in Social Contexts
  • SWK 357 – Processes of Aging
  • SWK 361 – Foundations of Social Work Research
  • SWK 400 – Selected Topics
  • SWK 403 – Social Work and the Human-Animal Bond
  • SWK 427 – Introduction to Military Culture and Social Work Practice
  • SWK 437 – LGBTQ Health and Well Being

Academic Advising

Academic advising is a shared responsibility between the student and the advisor. Although students are expected to take responsibility in managing their academic paths, the social work academic advisor provides the consultation and guidance necessary to foster students’ professional development. The advisement program of the School of Social Work uses faculty, professional staff, and student peer advisors. They can provide important information and assistance to you throughout your undergraduate study.

 First-Year Advising by Falk Student Services

Incoming BSSW students are registered and advised by Patricia Sweeney in Falk Student Services, Suite 300, MacNaughton Hall.

 Social Work Academic Advisors

Each BSSW student is assigned an advisor from among social work faculty and professional staff. Social work advisors will help you formulate your academic and career interests, connect you with University and community resources to develop those interests, and help clarify the direction of your study. Advising centers on your involvement with the BSSW degree program. Advisors will help you evaluate your progress and provide information regarding careers. As you prepare for graduation and consider employment or graduate study, your social work faculty advisor will help you explore alternatives and can support applications for employment and graduate study with appropriate letters of reference.

You are responsible for seeking the advice and consultation of your social work academic advisors when you are having academic problems. The flowchart below depicts the process of problem-solving in advising. 

Problem-solving and the Advising Process:

  • Student identifies a question or concern
  • Student consults the BSSW Handbook and/or any other documents that the handbook directs the student to, in order to address the concern (see end of document: Possible Resolutions)
    • Understanding of policy resolves the concern
    • If concern remains:
      • Student schedules a meeting with advisor to discuss issue.
      • In preparation for the meeting, student emails the advisor an outline of the concern that they wish to address. Include in the email the steps they have taken to resole the question/concern and the hoped for outcome for the concern.
      • Student meets and/or consults with academic advisor who coaches student regarding potential solutions.
        • Issue is resolved or a plan is made to address the concern
        • If no resolution:
          • The advisor consults with other appropriate parties and then sets a meeting with the student and/or persons whose attendance is necessary to discuss concern and potential solutions. Academic hearing may be among the potential solutions at this point.
            • Issue is resolved or a plan is made to address the concern
            • If no resolutions are found and an academic hearing is not requested, the academic advisor alerts the BSSW program director who consults to develop a plan

When you have a concern or question, please consult the BSSW Handbook first or any other relevant online documents. This may answer your question; however, if it does not, schedule a meeting with your academic advisor. Email your advisor and let them know what you want to discuss, what you’ve already done to try to resolve the issue, and what you hope they can help you achieve. Your advisor may answer your question or resolve the concern; however, if you still have questions/concerns, your advisor may consult with other appropriate parties or set up a joint meeting. An academic hearing may be requested if appropriate. If an academic hearing is not requested, but more assistance is needed, the advisor consults the BSSW Director, who develops a resolution.

You are also responsible for scheduling and keeping the required advising appointments during the advising period that precedes course registration for each academic term.

On rare occasions, it may be necessary for a student to seek a change in a social work academic advisor. Requests for such changes should be made through the BSSW Program Director.

Student Peer Advisors

Student peer advisors are assigned to all new full-time students. Your peer advisor will support your transition to Syracuse University. They help with issues such as course scheduling and registration, as well as with questions surrounding your first year at the University. They are a valuable source of information about the school, the campus, and the Syracuse community.

Part-Time Student Advising Process

Students studying part-time through University College (UC), will have both a UC advisor and a Social Work advisor.  When a part-time student first enters the social work major, they will meet with the Social Work Undergraduate Program Director to develop a timeline program of study. This timeline program of study will be given to the student to share with the UC Advisor. After the initial planning session, the student is required to meet with their social work academic advisor at least once per year; however, they are free to schedule an advising appointment at any point in the semester.

The social work faculty advisor may also request additional appointments if the student is in academic difficulty or for professional development concerns.

Registration

 You must be officially registered in order to attend classes. (See Appendix G regarding the policy on Visitors in the Classroom.) Entering first-year students and fall transfer students will be registered for their first semester of study by their first-year advisor in Falk Student Services. Second semester, they will again meet with their first-year advisor in Falk Student Services to plan recommended and alternate courses, after which they will transition to their social work academic advisor for the second, third, and fourth years of the program.

MySlice is Syracuse University’s portal for class search and registration as well as progress monitoring. To log in to MySlice, you will need your University ID and password. Passwords must be updated annually.

Prior to registration each semester, students should check their progress on Degree Works (accessed via MySlice).  Be sure to let your academic advisor know if you have questions about your Degree Works record. It is important to keep your record accurate and up to date. Your advisor can help to correct any errors.

You will plan your registration for each semester with your academic advisor. These meetings are important and mandatory, so there will be a HOLD place on your registration until this meeting has occurred. For full-time students, the course selection will be submitted electronically on the Falk Advising Form. This sends a summary of recommended and alternate courses to you, your advisor, and Student Services, where they will remove your Advising Hold.  For part-time students, course recommendations are sent electronically to your University College advisor.

The next step is for you to create a course schedule by choosing specific sections, days and times and putting your choices into your shopping cart.

Shortly before the registration period, each student is assigned an entry time and date. You will be notified by email of your registration appointment. It will tell you to go to MySlice to check the date and time of your appointment. That’s also where you will enroll for classes, check your enrollment profile, retrieve your class schedule and find other information and services.

New students register just before the term begins. Returning students are eligible to register for the next semester during the registration period at the end of fall and spring semesters. Students on Syracuse Abroad Programs register through Syracuse Abroad following special registration procedures.  Part-time students register through University College.

Students may make changes to their registration after the semester begins, by adding, dropping, or withdrawing from classes in accordance with published deadlines.

See SU Academic Rules - Registration for all rules concerning registration.

Academic Progress and Professional Behavior

Academic Progress

Your social work academic advisor will help you select courses that meet degree requirements in social work.  Each of your course syllabi will outline the policies specific to that course and specify the requirements for satisfactory participation and performance. Be sure to review each syllabus carefully at the beginning of the semester and mark all deadlines, exams, and due dates on your personal calendar.

Attendance in Classes

Attendance in classes is expected in all courses at SU. Class attendance requirements and policies concerning nonattendance are established by the instructor(s) of each class. Students are expected to arrive on campus in enough time to attend the first meeting of all registered classes.  Students who do not arrive and attend classes starting on the first day of their classes may be academically withdrawn by their college or departments as not making progress toward degree by failure to attend.

Academic Problem Solving

If you experience challenges in your courses, or are having other academic problems, you should be proactive in gathering more information and seeking a resolution. The flowchart below depicts the process of problem-solving in the classroom.

If you encounter a concern in the classroom, first consult the BSSW Handbook as well as University Rules and Regulations to learn the relevant policies. Then you can schedule a meeting with your professor to discuss the issue. If you still have a concern after meeting with your professor, make an appointment with your academic advisor. Email your advisor to let them know the nature of the problem, what steps you have already taken to resolve the matter, and how you are hoping that your advisor can help. Your advisor may coach you in ways to approach your professor again, or the advisor may consult with the professor directly. The advisor may also set a meeting with you and your professor together. If each of these steps is insufficient to resolve the problem, the academic advisor then consults the BSSW Director, who develops a resolution.

Problem Solving in the Classroom Flow-Chart

  • Student identifies a problem or concern
  • Student consults the BSSW Handbook and/or University Rules and Regulations regarding the policies relating to the matter
    • Understanding of policy resolves the concern
    • If concern remains:
      • Student schedules a meeting with professor to discuss issue
        • Issue is resolved or a plan is made to address the problem
        • If no resolution:
          • Student makes an appointment with academic advisor, emails them an outline of the concern that they might wish to address. Include in the email, the steps they have taken to resolve the problem/concern and the outcome for the problem that the student is hoping for.
          • Student meets and/or consults with academic advisor who coaches student regarding potential solutions.
            • Issue is resolved or a plan is made to address the problem
            • If no resolution:
              • The advisor consults with the professor and then sets a meeting with the student and/or professor to discuss the issue if necessary
                • Issue is resolved or a plan is made to address the problem
                • If no resolution:
                  • If an academic hearing is not requested, the academic advisor alerts the BSSW program director who consults to develop a plan

Possible resolutions may involve individualized modifications related to the classroom—for example referral to the Office of Disability Services or to the SU Writing Center, adjustments of assignments, course content, student behaviors, etc.). The process may also lead to a request for an Academic Hearing, or the student may choose to take a Leave of Absence.

Monitoring Academic Progress

As a candidate for the BSSW, you will monitor your progress toward meeting degree requirements using Degree Works, which is accessed via MySlice. Be sure to check your electronic advising report each semester for accuracy. It is important to maintain an accurate record of progress, because the Falk College Recorder and the Office of the Registrar will use Degree Works to certify your BSSW degree.

Mid-semester Progress Report (MSPR)

Your attendance and classroom performance will be monitored by your Instructor through Orange SUccess. As you approach mid-semester, your instructor will submit and MSPR, and your advisor will be notified that a progress report is available for viewing. If concerns are reported in any courses, your advisor may follow up with a request for you to schedule an appointment to problem-solve the challenges that you are experiencing. You are also encouraged to speak directly with your instructor and/or TA. (See Problem-solving in the Classroom.)

Progress Monitoring by Falk College

If you go below twelve credits in a regular semester you will be notified by Falk Student Students that you’ve been placed on Progress Monitoring status. The is not an academic probation status; it is intended to prevent further difficulty. Progress Monitoring includes:

  • Attending an Assessment Meeting with an assigned Student Support Counselor who will determine appropriate intervention for the under twelve situation (which could include moving to academic probation status).
  • Being place on the MSPR student report list to monitor their mid-semester progress to assess if intervention is warranted.

Academic Probation

The purpose of academic probation is to provide a consistent and fair method of academic sanction for all students that not only supports the academic rigor of the College and Syracuse University programs, but also provides direction and a system of intervention for students. Students in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics who have been placed on Academic Warning or One-Term Trial will have the availability of a number of resources within the College and University including access to an academic counselor who will work with them to develop and implement a plan that will lead to future academic success. 

Students will receive letters or emails notifying them of their probationary status as soon as possible after grades are posted. This letter or email will include information about the reason for the academic probation along with an explanation of how they can restore their good academic status and details on how to set up appointments with their assigned student support counselor.

Academic Probation Classifications

Academic Warning

Occurs the first time (and can only be designated once in a student’s academic career in Falk College) a student achieves one or more of the following:

  • Lower than a 2.0 semester and/or cumulative grade point average after a regular semester.
  • Excessive number of incompletes, NS’s and/or missing grades.
  • Lack of progress towards degree (especially in major requirements).

Students on Academic Warning can be removed from this status and moved to good academic standing by achieving the following in the Academic Warning Semester:

  • Earn 12 or more credit hours of advised and completed course work with a minimum of both a 2.0 semester and cumulative grade point average.
  • Make progress toward degree requirements.
  • Attend a minimum of Student Support meetings with their appointed counselor. The Student Support hold for registration will not be lifted until all meeting attendance is fulfilled.
One Term Trial

Occurs in subsequent regular semesters (after the Academic Warning or Readmit semester) when students achieve one or more of the following:

  • Lower than a 2.0 semester and/or cumulative grade point average after a regular semester.

  • Excessive number of incompletes, NA’s and/or missing grades.
  • Lack of progress towards degree (especially in major requirements).
  • No declared major upon achieving 54 credits.

Students on One Term Trial must achieve the following during the One Term Trial semester in order to be removed from this status and moved to good academic standing:

  • Attend Student Support meetings with their appointed counselor as designated in their one term trial letter. The Student Support hold for registration will not be lifted until all meeting attendance is fulfilled (as noted by their student support counselor).
  • Earn 12 or more credit hours of advised and completed course work with a minimum of both a 2.0 semester and cumulative grade point average.
  • Making adequate progress toward degree requirements.
  • Declaring a major.

If these requirements are not met, students may be suspended. See Appendix H for a description of the Academic Suspension and Appeal Procedures.

Graduation

When you have completed your final semester, your grades will be recorded, and your transcript reviewed to be certain all degree requirements have been met. If all requirements are complete, you will be certified for graduation by the college recorder, and your diploma will be sent to you from the Diploma Office in Steele Hall. There is usually about a two-month span from the time you finish your degree until you receive the diploma. If certain requirements have not been completed, you will be notified and asked to take appropriate action.

In order to obtain a Syracuse University degree, students must be in good standing with the University. “Good standing” includes a requirement that all matters pending before the University Judicial System have been fully and finally resolved (including, but no limited to, full satisfaction of any sanction imposed). Students who are not in good standings will not be granted a degree, will not have access to transcripts, and are not eligible to participate in graduation ceremonies.

No student will be certified for graduation with incomplete or missing grades unless they have completed all degree requirements, achieved the required 120 credit hours and earned a GPA not less than 2.0. Incomplete and missing grades are counted as failures in calculating the GPA. University Rules and Regulations set out the minimum GPA that undergraduate students must maintain. You cannot receive any undergraduate degree from Syracuse University without attaining a final cumulative GPA of 2.0 and being in good standing regarding professional behavior.

Professional Behavior

All members of the academic communities of Syracuse University, Falk College, and the School of Social Work—students, faculty, administrators and staff—are expected to hold themselves to high standards of academic and professional behavior. As a BSSW student, you are expected to conduct yourself in keeping with three sets of standards:

 

Together, these standards will guide your success as a student at Syracuse University and as a graduate working in the social work profession. Violations of these standards are taken seriously and will result in disciplinary action. See Appendix J: Accountability for Professional Behavior.

The Code of Ethics as adopted by the National Association of Social Workers serves as the primary basis for judgments concerning the appropriateness of the behavior of students, as well as relevant sections of the New York State Education law regarding the professions and New York State Regents Rules and Regulations. A student whose actions have raised concerns about professional behavior may be brought before the Academic Hearing Board of the School of Social Work under the policy for Academic Progress and Professional Behavior. The standards for Accountability for Professional Behavior and the procedures of the Academic Hearing Board are described in Appendix J.

In addition to their responsibility to guide and support students during the course of their professional education, the faculty and professional staff also recognize a responsibility to the profession of social work and to the people it serves. Consistent with the Council on Social Work Education Evaluation Standards and the Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers (see Appendix C and Appendix F), the School of Social Work considers both the performance and behavior of students in the classroom, in the internship, and in and around the University as matters of academic standing. Your performance and behavior are treated as indicative of your likely performance as a social work practitioner. Performance or behavior that demonstrates poor interpersonal skills, unethical, threatening or otherwise unprofessional conduct will be considered grounds for academic disciplinary action. This may include, but is not limited to, academic probation or dismissal.

Academic Integrity/Academic Dishonesty

Syracuse University defines academic dishonesty as a violation of the code of student conduct stating, "Academic dishonesty [shall include], but not [be] limited to: plagiarism and cheating, and other forms of academic misconduct, for example; misuse of academic resources or facilities, or misuse of computer software, data, equipment, or networks". Students’ violation of institutional policies related to academic dishonesty are covered by the University policy on Academic Integrity and Cases involving Academic Dishonesty are handled by the Academic Integrity Office (AIO). with support from the Center for Learning and Student Success (CLASS). CLASS works with faculty, instructors, students, and staff to promote understanding of Syracuse University’s academic integrity policy, coordinate its administration, and maintain records of all academic integrity cases. 

Your role as a student, scholar, and creator/composer of papers, art, and performance requires attention to the particulars of Academic Integrity. The policies that are most relevant to undergraduates are summarized in the Syracuse University 2019-2020 Student Handbook under Academic Integrity, and the full policy statement is available at Academic Integrity Policy.

Perhaps the easiest area to get tripped up is in proper citation of sources. Improper citation may be considered plagiarism, because you’ve represented ideas as your own that actually came from another source. The bottom line is that you should never copy and paste content from another source without crediting that source.

The School of Social Work uses the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) to guide all written work and specifically to dictate the proper citation format. Unless otherwise specified, all courses will expect you to follow APA style in your written work. This document will show you proper way to cite a quotation or passage taken directly from another source. It will show you how to credit those who originated ideas that you have paraphrased and re-used. It will even show you how to cite an idea that a friend or colleague gave you in conversation! It includes both how to show these sources correctly in the body of the paper (text citations) and how all References should appear at the end of the paper. It’s a little tedious, but you will soon master the details and be able to proof your own papers and to help your friends! While the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (6th ed.) is available for purchase both online and at the SU Bookstore, there are also a number of free online resources that can assist you. See the APA Citation Guide provided by the SU Library at Citation Guide:  APA.

Disciplinary/Grievance Procedures for Allegations of Academic Dishonesty

Formal disciplinary and grievance procedures exist at both the College and University level for handling allegations of academic dishonesty or violation of other university policies. The document, Falk College Grievance Committee Policies and Procedures Manual.

explains where different types of allegations are heard (see Appendix H for excerpts from this policy). The kinds of issues covered by University-wide offices outside of the School of Social Work and the College include accusations of sexual or racial harassment and violations of the Student Code of Conduct. The College Grievance Committee is responsible for appeals of a grade or of sanctions imposed by units within the College regarding academic dishonesty and unprofessional conduct. Additionally, the College Grievance Committee may adjudicate complaints involving academic dishonesty and unfair academic treatment of a student that come to it directly. Information about the College Grievance Committee and its procedures is available online at Falk College Grievance Policies and Procedures

A faculty member charging a student with academic dishonesty in a course may respond by discussing the concern with the student and then assigning a sanction. Notification of the imposition of a sanction will be sent to the Office of the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs of the College. The maximum sanction that may be assigned by this means is a failing grade in the course. However, a faculty member also may choose to invoke the formal procedures of the College Grievance Committee. The College Grievance Committee also handles appeals filed by students of sanctions imposed by faculty members in response to a charge of academic dishonesty. See the Falk College Grievance Policies and Procedures document for detailed information about rights and procedures.

Professional Conduct Violations

Students are expected to behave at all times in a manner consistent with norms of appropriate professional conduct and the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics (see Appendix I). Unprofessional or unethical conduct, or inadequacies in applying a knowledge base in practice, in the demonstration of professional relationship skills, or in behavior with clients and colleagues in the classroom, the university, the agency, or community may jeopardize academic standing. The policy on Accountability for Professional Behavior (Appendix J) forms the basis of actions that may be taken.

Cases involving violations of the Student Code of Conduct other than academic dishonesty are handled by the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.  Behavioral violations may result in Disciplinary Probation, Suspension or Expulsion from the University.

Table 1 in the College Grievance Committee Policies and Procedures document outlines where in the University various issues are handled (See Appendix K). You may also consult the Office of the Associate Dean of the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. They will assist you in determining whether the problem can be handled informally or whether it should be directed to the appropriate University office.

Other Scholastic Information

Syracuse University Email

Internal communication of the School of Social Work is conducted via email. This includes general announcements to students. All students currently registered and matriculated at Syracuse University automatically have an email account with the University. All communication from the School of Social Work and the University will be sent to your Syracuse University e-mail address. If you primarily use another email address, please have your university email forwarded to your other email address so that you do not miss important information sent from the School or University. Information about accessing your SU email account or forwarding your SU email to another address can be found on the SU web site.

Incomplete Grade

The grade "incomplete" may be granted to a student only if it can be demonstrated that it would be unfair to hold the student to the normal time limits of the course. Illness or exceptional circumstances are the usual basis for consideration. To receive an incomplete, a student must complete the Request for an Incomplete Form, available in the college recorders’ office in 300 MacNaughton Hall. The form represents a contract between the student and the faculty member, specifying the reasons for granting an incomplete and the conditions and time limit for removing it. Incompletes are counted as F's in calculation of the grade point average on the student's transcript. Failure to complete requirements within the specified period will result in the course grade indicated on the petition (usually an F) being posted to your record.

Pass/Fail

The Pass/Fail option is intended to provide students the opportunity to "try out" a subject of interest that may be new to them without risking the possibility of a low grade being counted in their GPA. "Pass" grades earn graduation credit but are not computed into the semester or cumulative GPA. "Fail" grades receive no graduation credit but are computed as "F's" in both the semester and cumulative GPA. With the exception of SWK 435-445: Field Practicum I & II, which by policy are graded pass/fail, only electives in the School of Social Work may be taken on a pass/fail basis. Forms are available in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics Student Services Office. After approval, the forms must be submitted to the Student Services Office for processing. The deadline for declaring your intention to take a course on a pass/fail basis is printed in the academic calendar.

Petition

The petition is a mechanism by which you receive permission to make any deviation from the normal degree requirements, University, College, School or department rules, regulations or policies. The required signatures differ with the nature of the petition, but final approval must always be given by the college Dean and the social work program director, and in most instances, the petition process is not complete until it is processed in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics Student Services Recorder’s Office. A copy of a denied or approved petition will be returned to you for your records. Petition forms are available online or from Falk Student Services, 300 MacNaughton Hall.

Probation and Dismissal

The terms of University Probation are published in the Syracuse University publication, Academic Rules and Regulations. The Dean of each individual college determines college academic probation. A social work student will be placed on College probation when he/she does not meet the criteria for satisfactory academic standing.

The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics College Office of Student Services will monitor the progress of students on College Probation, and students will be notified by the Director of the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics Student Services office of any special requirements, restrictions, or other action that may be imposed. 

Classroom Visitors (Appendix G)

The School of Social Work has a formal policy about bringing visitors with you to class. This is because client cases are sometimes discussed in class or students may disclose sensitive information about themselves. The text of the policy is located in Appendix C of this handbook. 

Summer School

Any social work student may take Summer Sessions courses, however, it is recommended that a student talk with his or her social work faculty/staff academic advisor during the spring semester prior to a summer enrollment to be certain the course(s) the student wishes to take will apply toward degree requirements. If a student wishes to take courses at another college or university, the courses must be approved by the Director of the Social Work Undergraduate Program and the Associate Dean of Student Services, prior to taking them. (This is to ensure that a course will successfully transfer back to fulfill a program requirement here.)

Upon completion of the course the student should request that the school's registrar send an official transcript of the grade to the Recorder’s Office to transfer the credits to Syracuse University records. Credit is allowed only for those courses in which a grade of "C" or better has been earned. Transfer credits appear as hours accepted; no course titles or grades will appear on the SU transcript and the grade is not calculated into the SU GPA.

Transfer Credit (Appendix D)

Transfer credit is accepted toward a SU degree consistent with University and School policies. The School of Social Work transfer credit policy is available in Appendix D. Syracuse University cannot accept any college or exam credit unless provided with official documentation of work completed. Therefore, it is always necessary for you to submit official transcripts (seal and signature) of all college work completed, and official notification from testing bodies of any test scores. Only courses with a grade of “C” or higher are transferable.

Academic credit is not awarded for life or work experience achieved prior to matriculation in the BSSW program.

Withdrawal/Leave of Absence

If, for some reason it becomes necessary for you to withdraw from school during a semester or take a leave of absence, you must submit a "Withdrawal/Leave of Absence Form." Leave of Absences are completed online in the Falk College Office of Student Services, 300 McNaughton Hall, or the university’s Office of Student Affairs, 306 Steele Hall. Conditions governing such a leave are outlined on the official form. 

Financial Aid

Financial Aid decisions are made when you enter the University as a first-year or transfer student and are re-evaluated with you regularly during your study. About 70% of entering first-year and transfer students receive financial aid. Each student receiving financial aid has a designated financial aid counselor from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid whose responsibility it is to work with the student concerning financial aid. You should discuss any questions with your financial aid counselor or a representative of the Financial Aid Office.

Note: As a matter of privacy, your academic advisor has no knowledge of your financial status.

Documentation

It is strongly recommended that you keep copies—electronic or paper—of all forms (e.g., drop/add, pass/fail, petitions, grades, papers, etc.). This protects you if there is ever any doubt as to your true actions or intent. The ability to provide documentation of a specific action may prove invaluable in solving a problem quickly and painlessly.

Graduating

Diploma Card

During registration for the spring semester of your senior year, you will be required to complete a diploma request card. The information on this card (name, address after graduation, program of study and anticipated degree date) must be available in Steele Hall to guarantee that you will receive materials pertaining to commencement. You must file a diploma request through MySlice (myslice.syr.edu) no later than the beginning of your last semester of study.

Graduation Honors

Graduation honors are granted to students who have completed a minimum of 60 hours of graded credit (60 hours exclusive of elective pass/fail and physical education courses) at Syracuse University, and who earn the following cumulative GPA's: 3.40 Cum Laude, 3.60 Magna Cum Laude, 3.80 Summa Cum Laude. No exceptions are made to these minimum GPA's (e.g., you will not graduate Cum Laude with a 3.399).

Other graduation honors include University Marshall, Class Marshall, and University Scholar. Selection is based on academic standing, campus involvement, and community service, and each has a specific nomination/selection process. 

Graduate School Inquiries

It is best to begin planning early and contact schools of interest during your junior year in preparation for completing applications for graduate study in the fall and spring of your senior year. Questions regarding our MSW program should be directed to Adrienne Renfroe, Coordinator of Graduate Admissions and Recruitment and Student Services, Room 268 White Hall, 443-1443.

Academic Opportunities

Barbara Richman Mirken New York City Social Work Immersion Trip

Through the generosity of the Barbara Richman Mirken Seminar Endowed Fund, a group of students can travel annually to New York City at no expense to themselves. This three-day study trip focuses on the history and practice of social work in New York City. See Appendix K for a description of this opportunity.

Legislative Policy Day

Each year, students have an opportunity to explore a policy issue in greater depth through an event that brings together legislators, subject matter experts, advocates, community members, faculty, and students. See Appendix L for a description of the James L. Stone Legislative Policy Day.

Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award

Our commitment to social justice is visibly celebrated each March, in commemoration of National Professional Social Work Month. The Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award is given to honor the memories of Professor Dan Rubenstein, a former faculty member in the School of Social Work, and his wife Mary Lou, a former school social worker. Students are welcome to attend this event, which is free and open to the public. See Appendix N for more information.

Renée Crown University Honors Program

Baccalaureate social work students may participate in the Renée Crown University Honors Program if they meet appropriate academic criteria. Honors study allows the student to enrich his/her educational experience through contact with students with diverse interests from across the University. Seminars, small honors courses, special events and contact with outstanding faculty provide additional intellectual challenge. The honors program culminates in an undergraduate thesis project. Your diploma will state: Honors in Social Work.

Students who are accepted into the Renée Crown University Honors Program are assigned an Honors advisor in addition to their social work academic advisor. Social work advisors are knowledgeable about the Honors Program, and many have taught or mentored students in the Honors Program.

Study Abroad Opportunities (SU Abroad)

Syracuse University Abroad consistently ranks among the highest-quality international study programs in the country. Students who choose Syracuse Abroad’s programs prepare for the world in the world with invaluable internships, Signature Seminars, language study at all levels, homestays, and community engagement projects. Syracuse University Study Abroad sponsors study opportunities in over 100 programs in 60 countries, including England, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Spain, Chile, Australia, and Hong Kong. With careful planning, students can satisfy other degree requirements while developing an appreciation of cultural differences through these programs.

We strongly encourage social work students to participate in an international, cross-cultural experience. The optimal time for social work students to study abroad is the spring semester of the junior year. The time abroad is usually used for humanities courses or electives. Be sure to let your academic advisor know that you intend to study abroad, so that all required courses can be taken in other semesters to graduate on schedule.

You can obtain additional information about this opportunity from the Syracuse University Abroad Office located at 106 Walnut Place. Applications for admission for study abroad are handled by this office. We hope you will think seriously about this opportunity to enrich your social work education.

Mary Anne Shaw Center for Public and Community Service

The Mary Anne Shaw Center for Public and Community Service, located at 309 Women’s Building, allows students to gain valuable work experience while earning academic credit. The internships provide students with a realistic view of career fields and allow students to network with other professionals. Social work students may participate in the Mary Anne Shaw Center for Public and Community Service opportunities.

Student Success Initiative

The Student SUccess Initiative (SSUI) offers a unique opportunity for selected undergraduate students to immerse themselves in an intensive academic climate during the summer sessions that lead to better grades, increased self-satisfaction, and renewed academic focus. Enrollment in SSUI is limited, and eligibility is determined by SSUI and the Falk College Student Services Office in the Spring semester. For more information, contact your advisor, the Director of the Undergraduate Program, Falk Student Services, or the SSUI office at 111 Waverly Avenue. 

Minors

Undergraduate social work students can choose to combine their major with minor areas of study. Popular minors among social work students include Psychology, Child and Family Studies, Health and Wellness, Public Health, African American Studies, Gerontology, and Policy Studies. A complete listing of minors can be found on the University website:

Undergraduate Majors and Minors

Double Majors

Undergraduate social work students may choose to add a second major to their studies at Syracuse University. Information about the degree requirements of other departments or schools is found in the Undergraduate Catalog. Fulfilling the requirements of more than one major within four years requires careful planning and may involve an additional semester or summer of study.

If a student decides to undertake a second major, forms are available from the Director of the BSSW Program or the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics recorder. Students typically remain in David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics as their primary or “home” college.

Experience Credit

Students may earn elective academic credit for volunteer or paid work experience in social service agencies that occurs while they are enrolled in the baccalaureate social work program. Learning contracts must be made for that experience before engaging in the experience and usually involve an agreement between the student, a supervising agency staff member, and an appropriate faculty member. Registration forms for Experience Credit are available in the program director’s office. Experience credit cannot take the place of a student’s senior field practicum. Academic credit is not awarded for life or work experience achieved prior to matriculation in the program. For more information, contact the Social Work Undergraduate Program Director.

Independent Study

Independent study is a University-wide option that may be offered by an academic unit in accordance with its own individual independent study guidelines. SWK 490 is a course that provides you an opportunity to do intensive research and/or reading under the supervision of a social work faculty member. You are responsible for seeking out a faculty member who will be willing to supervise your work. The faculty member will work with you to establish a contract that describes the nature of the study, plans for ongoing contact between you and the faculty member, and basis for evaluation. Faculty will supervise and evaluate the product of your independent study and will be responsible for assigning an appropriate grade. You may direct

questions about independent study to your academic advisor or the Director of the Undergraduate Social Work Program. To propose an Independent Study Course, visit the Falk College Forms & Information page for an Independent Study Form.

Honors and Leadership

Dean's List

A student is eligible for the Dean's List in the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics when he/she carries a minimum of 12 credit hours of graded work (i.e., exclusive of pass/fail), has no incompletes or missing grades, and earns a minimum of 3.4 grade point average for the semester.

NOTE: Since the pass/fail policy has been adopted for SWK 435/445, the Dean's List eligibility requirements for seniors only has been amended such that a senior registering for Field Instruction is considered eligible for Dean's List if he/she carries at least 10 credits (graded A-F) plus Field Instruction and earns a 3.4 GPA and a "P" in Field for the semester. 

Phi Alpha Honor Society

The Phi Alpha Honor Society is a national social work honors organization, fully accredited by the Association of College Honors Societies (ACHS). Please see Appendix B to learn more about the Zeta Gamma chapter of Phi Alpha here at Syracuse University.

University 100

University 100 (U100) is a group of Syracuse University student ambassadors who represent our diverse community and share their love of Orange through campus tours and networking events. University 100 is named to recognize its role and honorary stature within the University. And as the name suggests, there are approximately 100 students in the organization annually who reflect the diversity of the University. U100 members represent each college and many geographic and ethnic backgrounds. Applications are available online in the Spring semester or from the Office of Admissions, Crouse Hinds Hall. 

Remembrance Scholarship

The Remembrance Scholarship annually recognizes 35 outstanding seniors in memory of the 35 Syracuse University students who died in the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103 in 1988 over Lockerbie, Scotland. Candidates for the Scholarship must apply during the Spring of their junior year and demonstrate academic excellence, campus involvement, and commitment to the larger community. Personal essays regarding the terrorist attack are required for consideration along with an application that is available from the Office of Admissions, Crouse Hinds Hall.

Chancellor's Award for Public Engagement and Scholarship

The Chancellor’s Award for Public Engagement and Scholarship annually recognizes two individual students—one graduate and one undergraduate—who have significantly engaged in their community as part of a dynamic learning experience. Nominations should demonstrate student commitment to promote public engagement and scholarship that enhances learning and helps to meet real-world needs.

Student Involvement in the School of Social Work

Phi Alpha Honor Society

The Phi Alpha Honor Society is a national social work honors organization, fully accredited by the Association of College Honors Societies (ACHS). Please see Appendix B to learn more about the Zeta Gamma chapter of Phi Alpha here at Syracuse University. 

Social Workers United

Social Workers United (SWU) is the social work student organization developed by and for our undergraduate and graduate students to encourage broader acquaintances among social work students, to discuss academic and career interests, and as a channel for student participation within the School.

In previous years, the student organization has conducted fund-raising activities to support special service projects needed in the community. The organization has also sponsored distinguished guest speakers and career seminars. The extent to which SWU can accomplish its goals depends upon the level of interest and participation of the students themselves.  Currently, all members are graduate students, and we are looking forward to reinvigorating the undergraduate component of the organization. Faculty sponsors include: Ken Marfilius, Teaching Professor, Jennifer Genovese, MSW Program Director, and Kristin Esposito, Field Placement Coordinator. 

Falk College Peer Advising Program

The primary job of the Falk College Peer Advisor is to help incoming first-year and transfer students understand and transition into college life. The Peer Advisor contacts their advisees (usually 8-10 students) in the summer and then meets with their group of advisees during Syracuse Welcome Weekend in the fall. After that, Peer advisors are asked to be available to their advisees as needed, especially during their first semester of study here. Peer Advisors may also assist Falk College Student Services with various meetings and activities during Welcome Weekend, give campus tours, and assist with schedule adjustments. Mandatory trainings are held in August to prepare for the orientation activities of Welcome Weekend. For more information, please contact the Peer Advising Program Coordinator, Malissa Monaghan mamonagh@syr.edu

School of Social Work Governance Committees

Opportunities for involvement in the School of Social Work exist for undergraduate students through participation in the School's self-governance committees. Students are represented on the BSSW Program Committee, the Faculty Recruitment Committee, and the Promotion and Tenure Committee. Student representatives are also present on the College Diversity Committee. More information is available from the Director of the Undergraduate Social Work Program and the Director of the School of Social Work.

Volunteering

Groups and Activities

Join a fraternity or sorority, connect with your culture, get out into nature, write for a student-run publication, or fight to protect human or animal rights. With over 300 student organizations, you'll find something that will pique an interest (or 20!). Not sure where to start? The Office of Student Activities is your gateway to social activities, programs, and events that not only fill up your calendar, but also enhance your education.

Shaw Center for Public and Community Service

The Mary Ann Shaw Center for Public and Community Service (CPCS), located in the Women’s Building, provides information on over 300 community agencies in need of volunteers. Through Leadership, Community Based Service Learning, Literacy Programs, and Consultation, the Shaw Center provides guidance and support  for students, faculty and staff to develop academic opportunities that meet learning outcomes while helping our community partners meet their self-identified needs.

Alpha Phi Omega

Alpha Phi Omega is a gender inclusive national service fraternity that provides opportunities for leadership, friendship, and service to the community. More information can be obtained from their national website. 

Group Volunteer Projects

The Office of Engagement Programs assists student organizations, fraternities and sororities, and other student groups with connecting with local nonprofit agencies for one-time volunteer service projects. For more information or to organize a volunteer project for your group, contact engagesu@syr.edu.

Campus Resources

Numerous campus resources are outlined in the Syracuse University 2019-2020 Student Handbook. The following is only a brief list of available services and resources. Refer to the Student Handbook for information on additional services.

Falk College Career Services

Falk College Career Services provides assistance with career planning, job searching, and graduate school planning to all students and alumni. Services available include personalized counseling, professional and graduate school advising, a Career Resource Center with job listings and information on employers, careers, and job search strategies, standardized career guidance testing, résumé and cover letter critiquing, on- and off-campus interviewing with employers, a credentials service for letters of recommendation and other documents, a computerized employer database, workshops on job search skills, and video-taped mock interviews. Career Services is located in the offices of Falk Student Services, MacNaughton Hall, Suite 300.

The David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics offers career services specifically targeted to students in social work and the other majors within the college. The Placement Coordinators within the School of Social Work can also assist you with résumés and career information. To schedule an appointment, see Falk Career Services Contact Us 

Commuter and Off-Campus Resources

Student support services can be accessed by commuting and Off-Campus students through the Office of Off-Campus and Commuter Services (Goldstein Student Center, South Campus, Suite 206, 315-443-5489). The office functions as a problem-solving resource center that can address student concerns, inform students, and assist them in obtaining greater campus involvement. Soon to be merged with the Office of Student Living.

Computing Services

Information Technology and Services (ITS) provides information on computing services available, such as hours and locations of computer clusters and computer purchasing programs. They also provide assistance with computer problems. The office holds workshops on various software and assists members of the University in setting up e-mail accounts. Contact 443-2677 or go to Information Technology Services.

Center for Learning and Student Success

The Center for Learning and Student Success (CLASS) provides academic support services, including one-on-one tutoring, small-group tutoring and workshops, as well as academic integrity education and training. The Center is located in Room 014 Bird Library (basement level). For more information or to book a tutoring appointment, call 443-2005. 


Office of Student Employment Services (HRSES)

The Office of Student Employment Services (HRSES) maintains information about all student jobs, including on- and off-campus, both work-study and non-work study positions. This information is also accessible on the campus-wide computer system, JOBNET. The Student Employment Office is located at 210 Steele Hall. Call 315-443-2268 or email hrses@syr.edu

Counseling Center

The Counseling Center supports and enhances student health and wellness by providing comprehensive and holistic mental health, substance abuse, and sexual assault and relationship violence-related services. Previously located at 200 Walnut Avenue, the Counseling Center is moving to the Barnes Center at the Arch in fall 2019. Call 315-443-4715 to schedule an appointment. There are no fees for full-time students. 

Office of Disability Services 

The mission of The Office of Disability Services (ODS) is to engage the University Community to empower students, enhance equity, and provide a platform for innovation and inclusion. Located at 804 University Avenue, Suite 303, this office provides assistance with physical, psychological and learning disabilities. Contact 315-443-4498 (Voice), 315-443-1371(TDD), or 315-443-1312 (Fax).

Appendices

Appendix A: Essential Abilities for Social Work

Beyond academic standards, there are cognitive, emotional and character requirements necessary to complete your course of study and participate fully in all aspects of social work practice. You will be guided in the process of acquiring and strengthening these abilities throughout the BSSW program, and you will continue this journey as a lifelong learner following your BSSW degree.

As a student in the Syracuse University School of Social Work, you can expect to develop the following abilities and attributes as you progress through the program. You will engage these attributes both within and outside of the classroom, including your practice experiences and social circles. These abilities will also be part of evaluations of your practicum and academic performance.

Academic Integrity: Throughout the program, you are expected to demonstrate academic integrity in the preparation of written assignments, research and scholarly papers and must understand and adhere to the S.U. Policy on Academic Integrity which prohibits academic dishonesty, such as cheating, plagiarism, internet plagiarism or untruthfulness in communication with faculty.

Communication Skills: You will learn to communicate effectively and sensitively with other students, faculty, staff, clients and other professionals. You will express your ideas and feelings clearly and also demonstrate a willingness and ability to listen thoughtfully to others.

Self-Awareness: As a social work student, you will come to appreciate how your values, attitudes, beliefs, emotions and past experiences affect your thinking, behavior and relationships. You must be willing to examine and change your behavior when it interferes with working effectively with clients and other professionals, including persons in organizationally subordinate positions and those in positions of authority.

Professional Commitment: You must have a strong commitment to the goals of social work and to the ethical standards of the profession. You must be committed to the essential values of social work, which are the dignity and worth of every individual and their right to a just share of society's resources.

Knowledge Base for Social Work Practice: Your professional activities will be grounded in relevant social, behavioral and biological science knowledge and research. This includes knowledge and skills in relationship-building, data-gathering, assessment, interventions and evaluation of practice.

Evaluative Thinking: Throughout your program of study, you will learn to use information, reasoning and experience to think critically, consider value tradeoffs, and assess consequences. Evaluative thinking enriches your undergraduate experience—both in terms of supporting a well-grounded intellectual environment and scholarly inquiry and improving your personal decision-making.

Empathy: Upon entrance into the program and increasingly as you progress through the program, you will be expected to work diligently to understand and appreciate the ways of life and value systems of others. You must be able to communicate empathy and support to clients and community members as a basis for a productive professional relationship.

Self-Care: You must build resistance to the undesirable effects of stress, exercising appropriate self-care and developing cooperative and facilitative relationships with faculty, field educators, administrators, colleagues and peers. Your peers will become a key component of your support system.

Acceptance of Diversity: As you progress through the program, you are expected to demonstrate an appreciation of the complexity and value of human diversity. In the field practicum, you will serve all persons in need of assistance, regardless of the person’s age, class, race, ethnicity, religious affiliation (or lack thereof), gender identity, ability, sexual expression, and value system.

Interpersonal Skills: You must demonstrate the interpersonal skills needed to relate effectively to fellow students, faculty, staff, clients and other professionals. These include compassion, altruism, integrity, and the demonstration of respect for and consideration of others.

Professional Behavior: You must behave professionally by practicing within the scope of your skills and knowledge, adhering to the profession's code of ethics, respecting others, being punctual and dependable, prioritizing responsibilities, and completing assignments on time. You must demonstrate a willingness to accept feedback and must not practice outside your areas of competence without engaging in training, consultation and supervision.

Appendix B. Phi Alpha Honor Society – “Through Knowledge – the challenge to serve”

Phi Alpha Honor Society is a national honor society for social work students.

Zeta Gamma Chapter

The Zeta Gamma chapter of Phi Alpha Honors Society was founded at Syracuse University in 1996. It is open to both undergraduate (BSSW) students and graduate (MSW) students. The Directors of the Undergraduate and Graduate programs serve as faculty advisors. Chapter officers—President, Vice-President and Secretary—are elected annually from current members. Officers may choose to serve more than one term to provide continuity in chapter leadership.

Membership

Membership in Phi Alpha is by invitation to students who have achieved academic excellence. Eligibility standards are set at the national level. To be eligible for membership, undergraduate students must have

  • Declared social work as their major,
  • Completed at least 9 credit hours of required social work courses or at least 37.5% of the total hours/credits required for the degree, whichever is later achieved, and
  • Rank in the top 35% of their class.

Upon accepting the invitation to join Phi Alpha, students pay a one-time membership fee. Students who are unable to pay the fee may request financial assistance. Induction of new members occurs in the spring semester of each academic year. Invitations are based upon students’ cumulative GPA and academic record after the fall semester.

About Phi Alpha

Founded in 1962, there are 480 chapters of Phi Alpha Honor Society in 50 states, Canada, and Puerto Rico. The purpose of Phi Alpha Honor Society is to provide a closer bond among students of social work and promote humanitarian goals and ideals. Phi Alpha fosters high standards of education for social workers and invites into membership those who have attained excellence in scholarship and achievement in social work.  Phi Alpha inducts 10,000 new members each year and offers 6 award, grant, and scholarship programs. See Phi Alpha Honor Society for descriptions and deadlines. Phi Alpha headquarters are located at East Tennessee State University. 

On February 14, 2019, Phi Alpha was certified as a member of the Association of College Honors Societies (ACHS) in recognition of the society’s compliance with the high standards for scholarship and organizational ethics set forth by ACHS. For Phi Alpha’s campus chapters, ACHS certification provides student members with additional prestige and hiring preferences. Membership in ACHS-certified societies guarantees that students meet the criteria for “Superior Scholastic Achievement,” a designation that qualifies graduates for entry to federal employment at a higher paygrade.

Appendix C: CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS)

The Syracuse University BSSW program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE), which assures that you receive a quality educational program.

The Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) uses the Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards (EPAS) to accredit our program. EPAS supports academic excellence by establishing thresholds for professional competence. CSWE first adopted a competency-based education framework for its EPAS in 2008. This shifted the focus of accreditation from content (what students should be taught) and structure (the format and organization of educational components) to one focused on student learning outcomes. A competency-based approach refers to identifying and assessing what students demonstrate in practice. In social work, this approach involves assessing students’ ability to demonstrate the competencies identified in the educational policy.

Assessment of student learning outcomes is an essential component of competency-based education. Assessment provides evidence that students have demonstrated the level of competence necessary to enter professional practice, which in turn shows that programs are successful in achieving their goals. Assessment information is used to improve our BSSW program and the methods used to assess student learning outcomes.

Social work competence is the ability to integrate and apply social work knowledge, values, and skills to practice situations in a purposeful, intentional, and professional manner to promote human and community well-being. There are nine Social Work Competencies, which you will be expected to achieve. These also guide the content and delivery of our curriculum:

Competency 1: Demonstrate Ethical and Professional Behavior

Social workers understand the value base of the profession and its ethical standards, as well as relevant laws and regulations that may impact practice at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels. Social workers understand frameworks of ethical decision-making and how to apply principles of critical thinking to those frameworks in practice, research, and policy arenas. Social workers recognize personal values and the distinction between personal and professional values. They also understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions influence their professional judgment and behavior. Social workers understand the profession’s history, its mission, and the roles and responsibilities of the profession. Social Workers also understand the role of other professions when engaged in inter-professional teams. Social workers recognize the importance of life-long learning and are committed to continually updating their skills to ensure they are relevant and effective. Social workers also understand emerging forms of technology and the ethical use of technology in social work practice.

Competency 2: Engage Diversity and Difference in Practice

Social workers understand how diversity and difference characterize and shape the human experience and are critical to the formation of identity. The dimensions of diversity are understood as the intersectionality of multiple factors including but not limited to age, class, color, culture, disability and ability, ethnicity, gender, gender identity and expression, immigration status, marital status, political ideology, race, religion/spirituality, sex, sexual orientation, and tribal sovereign status. Social workers understand that, as a consequence of difference, a person’s life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim. Social workers also understand the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination and recognize the extent to which a culture’s structures and values, including social, economic, political, and cultural exclusions, may oppress, marginalize, alienate, or create privilege and power.

Competency 3: Advance Human Rights and Social, Economic, and Environmental Justice

Social workers understand that every person regardless of position in society has fundamental human rights such as freedom, safety, privacy, an adequate standard of living, health care, and education. Social workers understand the global interconnections of oppression and human rights violations, and are knowledgeable about theories of human need and social justice and strategies to promote social and economic justice and human rights. Social workers understand strategies designed to eliminate oppressive structural barriers to ensure that social goods, rights, and responsibilities are distributed equitably and that civil, political, environmental, economic, social, and cultural human rights are protected.

Competency 4: Engage In Practice-informed Research and Research-informed Practice

Social workers understand quantitative and qualitative research methods and their respective roles in advancing a science of social work and in evaluating their practice. Social workers know the principles of logic, scientific inquiry, and culturally informed and ethical approaches to building knowledge. Social workers understand that evidence that informs practice derives from multidisciplinary sources and multiple ways of knowing. They also understand the processes for translating research findings into effective practice.

Competency 5: Engage in Policy Practice

Social workers understand that human rights and social justice, as well as social welfare and services, are mediated by policy and its implementation at the federal, state, and local levels. Social workers understand the history and current structures of social policies and services, the role of policy in service delivery, and the role of practice in policy development. Social workers understand their role in policy development and implementation within their practice settings at the micro, mezzo, and macro levels and they actively engage in policy practice to effect change within those settings. Social workers recognize and understand the historical, social, cultural, economic, organizational, environmental, and global influences that affect social policy. They are also knowledgeable about policy formulation, analysis, implementation, and evaluation.

Competency 6: Engage with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that engagement is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers value the importance of human relationships. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to facilitate engagement with clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand strategies to engage diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness.

Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may impact their ability to effectively engage with diverse clients and constituencies. Social workers value principles of relationship-building and inter-professional collaboration to facilitate engagement with clients, constituencies, and other professionals as appropriate.

Competency 7: Assess Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that assessment is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in the assessment of diverse clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand methods of assessment with diverse clients and constituencies to advance practice effectiveness. Social workers recognize the implications of the larger practice context in the assessment process and value the importance of inter-professional collaboration in this process. Social workers understand how their personal experiences and affective reactions may affect their assessment and decision-making.

Competency 8: Intervene with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that intervention is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers are knowledgeable about evidence- informed interventions to achieve the goals of clients and constituencies, including individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge to effectively intervene with clients and constituencies. Social workers understand methods of identifying, analyzing and implementing evidence-informed interventions to achieve client and constituency goals. Social workers value the importance of inter- professional teamwork and communication in interventions, recognizing that beneficial outcomes may require interdisciplinary, inter- professional, and inter-organizational collaboration.

Competency 9: Evaluate Practice with Individuals, Families, Groups, Organizations, and Communities

Social workers understand that evaluation is an ongoing component of the dynamic and interactive process of social work practice with, and on behalf of, diverse individuals, families, groups, organizations and communities. Social workers recognize the importance of evaluating processes and outcomes to advance practice, policy, and service delivery effectiveness. Social workers understand theories of human behavior and the social environment, and critically evaluate and apply this knowledge in evaluating outcomes. Social workers understand qualitative and quantitative methods for evaluating outcomes and practice effectiveness.

To read the full policy statement, including professional Educational Policies on Program Mission and Goals (1.0), Generalist Practice 2.0), Diversity (3.0), and Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes (4.0), as well as further details on behaviors associated with each of the nine competencies, please see CSWE Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards.

Appendix D: Policy Governing Acceptance of Transfer Credits

Transfer credit is officially evaluated by the Falk College Recorder only after admission to the university. A statement of acceptable credit is given to the candidate and the BSSW Program Director by the College Recorder. A student may appeal the results of the evaluation and may, given petition and appropriate evidence, have the transfer credit evaluation modified.

Credit is granted toward the completion of the BSSW and its requirements as follows:

  1. Liberal Skills Requirements - Transcripts of candidates are evaluated and credit is granted for courses equivalent to those identified as liberal skills requirements. Note: transfer credit cannot be accepted for any writing requirement.
  2. Divisional Perspectives Requirements - Transcripts of candidates are evaluated and credit is granted for courses equivalent to those identified as divisional perspectives requirements.
  3. Social Work Requirements - Transcripts of candidates are evaluated and course descriptions or syllabi may be reviewed and credit is granted for courses equivalent to social work requirements, subject to the following conditions:
    • Social Welfare Policy Courses (SWK 314, SWK 315)
    • Social Work Practice Courses (SWK 201, SWK 202, SWK 301, SWK 401, SWK 402) - A maximum of nine credit hours of equivalent credit is granted for courses SWK 201, SWK 202, SWK 301. SWK 401 and SWK 402 must be taken at Syracuse University; no equivalent credit is granted.
    • Human Behavior and Social Environment Courses (SWK 326, SWK 328)
    • Social Work Research Course (SWK 361) – A maximum of three credit hours of equivalent credit is granted.
    • Field Practicum and Seminar (SWK 435, SWK 436, SWK 445, SWK 446) - No equivalent credit is granted; however, upon submission of field evaluations or other appropriate evidence attesting to the nature of previous field instruction, placements will be made so as to minimize duplication of previous field instruction.

Academic credit is not awarded for life or work experience achieved prior to matriculation in the BSSW program.

Appendix E: Intent to Major in Social Work

Intent to Major: 
Bachelor of Science in Social Work (BSSW)

Social workers share a fundamental commitment to creating social and economic justice in a diverse and rapidly changing world. Through practice that challenges oppression and increases the power and wellness of vulnerable people, we work to create a more just society. The School of Social Work embraces the profession’s commitment to the values of human diversity and the dignity and worth of all people, with particular attention to those who are oppressed, vulnerable, or living in poverty. We view social and personal problems as resulting from complex interactions between people and the structures of society itself, and we work to address those problems at the level of public policy, community organizations, families, groups, and individuals. The BSSW prepares graduates for generalist practice in a wide range of human service organizations. To complete the BSSW degree, students must complete required coursework as well as substantive field placements to develop the necessary skills for ethical and effective practice.

As a profession, social work is premised on a code of ethics. BSSW students are expected to understand and act according to the following values and principles.

Value: Service
Ethical Principle: Social workers' primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.

Value: Social Justice
Ethical Principle: Social workers challenge social injustice.

Value: Dignity and Worth of the Person
Ethical Principle: Social workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person.

Value: Importance of Human Relationships
Ethical Principle: Social workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.

Value: Integrity
Ethical Principle: Social workers behave in a trustworthy manner.

Value: Competence
Ethical Principle: Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional expertise. 

Students should access the complete NASW Code of Ethics here: Code of Ethics NASW 

Please answer the following questions about your interest and readiness for the BSSW program:

  1. What are your career goals, and how do you think the BSSW will help you reach them?
  2. What social injustices are you interested in addressing as a social worker?
  3. Describe your interest and readiness to learn about and work with people who are different from you in terms of race, ethnicity, age, gender identity, (dis)ability, etc.

 By signing below, I indicate that I have read and understood this document, including the NASW Code of Ethics, and that I plan to complete the BSSW requirements.

____________________________                     _____________________

Student Name                                                      SU ID

____________________________                     _____________________

Student Signature                                        Date

 

By signing below, I attest that I have reviewed this application and accept this student into the BSSW major.

____________________________                     _____________________

BSSW Director Signature                                Date 

Appendix F: Code of Ethics of the National Association of Social Workers

Approved by the 1996 NASW Delegate Assembly and subsequently revised and approved in 1999, 2008, and 2017 by the NASW Delegate Assembly, NASW Code of Ethics.

The mission of the social work profession is rooted in a set of core values. These core values, embraced by social workers throughout the profession's history, are the foundation of social work's unique purpose and perspective: service, social justice, dignity and worth of the person, importance of human relationships, integrity, and competence.

Professional ethics are at the core of social work. The profession has an obligation to articulate its basic values, ethical principles, and ethical standards. The NASW Code of Ethics sets forth these values, principles, and standards to guide social workers' conduct. The Code is relevant to all social workers and social work students, regardless of their professional functions, the settings in which they work, or the populations they serve.

The NASW Code of Ethics serves six purposes. The code:

  1. Identifies core values on which social work's mission is based.
  2. Summarizes broad ethical principles that reflect the profession's core values and establishes a set of specific ethical standards that should be used to guide social work practice.
  3. Helps social workers identify relevant considerations when professional obligations conflict or ethical uncertainties arise.
  4. Provides ethical standards to which the general public can hold the social work profession accountable.
  5. Socializes practitioners new to the field to social work's mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards.
  6. Articulates standards that the social work profession itself can use to assess whether social workers have engaged in unethical conduct.

The Code offers a set of values, principles, and standards to guide decision making and conduct when ethical issues arise. It does not provide a set of rules that prescribe how social workers should act in all situations. Specific applications of the Code must take into account the context in which it is being considered and the possibility of conflicts among the Code's values, principles, and standards.

Ethical responsibilities flow from all human relationships, from the personal and familial to the social and professional. Further, the NASW Code of Ethics does not specify which values, principles, and standards are most important and ought to outweigh others in instances when they conflict. Reasonable differences of opinion can and do exist among social workers with respect to the ways in which values, ethical principles, and ethical standards should be rank ordered when they conflict.

Ethical decision making in a given situation must apply the informed judgment of the individual social worker and should also consider how the issues would be judged in a peer review process where the ethical standards of the profession would be applied.

Ethical decision making is a process. There are many instances in social work where simple answers are not available to resolve complex ethical issues. Social workers should take into consideration all the values, principles, and standards in this Code that are relevant to any situation in which ethical judgment is warranted. Social workers' decisions and actions should be consistent with the spirit as well as the letter of this Code.

ValueEthical PrincipleDescription
ServiceSocial workers' primary goal is to help people in need and to address social problems.Social workers elevate service to others above self-interest. Social workers draw on their knowledge, values, and skills to help people in need and to address social problems. Social workers are encouraged to volunteer some portion of their professional skills with no expectation of significant financial return (pro bono service).

Social Justice

Social workers challenge social injustice.

Social workers pursue social change, particularly with and on behalf of vulnerable and oppressed individuals and groups of people. Social workers' social change efforts are focused primarily on issues of poverty, unemployment, discrimination, and other forms of social injustice.

These activities seek to promote sensitivity to and knowledge about oppression and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers strive to ensure access to needed information, services, and resources; equality of opportunity; and meaningful participation in decision making for all people.

Dignity and Worth of the PersonSocial workers respect the inherent dignity and worth of the person. 

Social workers treat each person in a caring and respectful fashion, mindful of individual differences and cultural and ethnic diversity. Social workers promote clients' socially responsible self-determination. Social workers seek to enhance clients' capacity and opportunity to change and to address their own needs. Social workers are cognizant of their dual responsibility to clients and to the broader society.

They seek to resolve conflicts between clients' interests and the broader society's interests in a socially responsible manner consistent with the values, ethical principles, and ethical standards of the profession.

Importance of Human RelationshipsSocial workers recognize the central importance of human relationships.Social workers understand that relationships between and among people are an important vehicle for change. Social workers engage people as partners in the helping process. Social workers seek to strengthen relationships among people in a purposeful effort to promote, restore, maintain, and enhance the well-being of individuals, families, social groups, organizations, and communities.
IntegritySocial workers behave in a trustworthy manner.Social workers are continually aware of the profession's mission, values, ethical principles, and ethical standards and practice in a manner consistent with them. Social workers act honestly and responsibly and promote ethical practices on the part of the organizations with which they are affiliated.
Competence Social workers practice within their areas of competence and develop and enhance their professional expertise.Social workers continually strive to increase their professional knowledge and skills and to apply them in practice. Social workers should aspire to contribute to the knowledge base of the profession.

The Code of Ethics presents specific standards in six areas, flowing from these values and principles: (1) social workers' ethical responsibilities to clients, (2) social workers' ethical responsibilities to colleagues, (3) social workers' ethical responsibilities in practice settings, (4) social workers' ethical responsibilities as professionals, (5) social workers' ethical responsibilities to the social work profession, and (6) social workers' ethical responsibilities to the broader society.

To examine the details of the Ethical Standards and to familiarize yourself with the complete NASW Code of Ethics, click on NASW Code of Ethics.

Appendix G: Policy on Allowing Visitors in the Classroom

The question of who students can bring to "sit in" with them in class is an important one since client cases are sometimes discussed in class or students may disclose sensitive personal information. For those who are social work students, we have a code of professional behavior. We distribute it to students and speak to them about it at orientation and in our courses. We have a mechanism for sanctioning them should they violate professional behavior in some way. We have no formal relationship with other people who may be brought into the classroom as a visitor, whether that person is a friend, a spouse or partner, or a child.

In light of these considerations, the following is the policy of the School of Social Work:

No student is permitted to bring a visitor, friend, child, spouse, etc. to class without prior approval from the faculty member teaching the course.

In determining whether to permit this visitor into the classroom, the faculty member will consider the following:

  1. Whether confidential information is likely to be shared in class
  2. Whether the presence of the visitor will have a negative impact upon the other students in terms of their ability to comfortably learn and to speak out in class
  3. Whether the content of the course is appropriate for the visitor (e.g., infants don't comprehend the discussion, but 12-year olds do comprehend to some degree)

Consistent with these criteria, visitors generally will not be allowed to "sit in" on practice courses. There may be other courses where tough issues, personal disclosure, or high emotions occur (possibly psychopathology, diversity, other HBSE courses) where children or others should not be allowed.

If the faculty member has questions about whether to allow a visitor in an undergraduate course in a particular instance, they will consult with the BSSW Program Director or the Director of the School of Social Work for guidance.

This policy should be announced to students at the beginning of the semester. If a student has a last-minute child care problem and the child is old enough (and well behaved), it is not a problem if the child is brought to the School of Social Work to read in another room or use the computers while the parent is in a class for which the child's presence is inappropriate.

Appendix H: Academic Suspension and Appeal Procedures

Students are suspended from the Falk College if they fail to meet the requirements stipulated during the one term trial semester of their academic probation. Students do have the option of appealing their suspension if there are substantial reason for doing so (see Appealing a Suspension below). Student appeals (along with transcripts and attendance at student support meetings) are reviewed by the Falk College Academic review Committee which consists of faculty and staff within the college along with counselors from the Office of Students Services and is chaired by the Associate Dean.

Students who accept their suspension have the option of applying for future readmission provided they meet the requirements for readmission set forth by the Falk College.

Appealing a Suspension (Immediately After Suspension)

If a student chooses to appeal an academic suspension from the Falk College, they must submit an email of appeal to the Office of Student Services by the deadline (pay attention to the date and time) stated on the suspension letter. The email or letter should address the points below and should only be 2-3 pages in length. Please note that what you write is considered CONFIDENTIAL information and will only be shared with the Academic Review Committee and your appeal will NOT be placed in your academic file.

This email should be sent to: falkss@syr.edu or Faxed to 315-443-2562 (Attn: James Byrne)

Notification of Appeal Decision and Follow up Actions

Students will be notified by email of the Academic Review Committee decision. Please note that it is extremely improbable that an appeal will be honored after a previous suspension and appeal.

If the appeal is granted, the student will be on One Term Trial and will receive an email describing the conditions of this probation during the semester they return, including how often they will need to see their academic support counselor.

Please Note: The Decision of the Academic Review Committee is Final.

Outline for Appeal Letter

Open the letter in a professional manner
  • Introduce yourself.

  • Thank the Academic Review Committee for taking time to review your letter
  • Explain why you are writing the letter.
  • Brief reason for Suspension.
Reason for Suspension
  • Give specific and honest details of why you had academic problems.

  • Include information regarding any health, mental health and/or substance abuse issues, learning disabilities, family/personal issues or situations that compromised your ability to succeed academically.

Supportive Services
  • Tell if you did or did not met meet with your Academic Support Counselor

  • Tell if you received any other supportive services like tutoring, therapy, medical treatment, working with ODS, etc.

  • If you did not use these services, or if you did not use these supportive services as much as you should have, explain why not
  • If you did receive supportive service, written documentation from your provider(s) will strengthen your appeal.
Your Plan to Be a More Successful Student
  • Explain what you plan to do differently to be a more successful student next semester.

  • Explain how your work habits, employment status, living arrangement and environment, study skills, lifestyle and/or habits will change to improve your academic success.

  • Be honest and realistic as to why you feel these new strategies will work. Include specific behaviors that will help you recover from your poor academic performance.
  • Include supportive service that you plan on using.
Conclusion
  • Explain why your education and being here at Syracuse is important to you.

  • Ask the Academic Review Committee to please take your letter into consideration and accept your request for an appeal.

  • Thank the Academic Review Committee for taking the time to consider your appeal.

Readmission After Suspension

There are two ways in which students who have been academically suspended can be readmitted to the Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics—Fast Track or Standard Readmission—as described below. In the event of a suspension by the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities, the student must ALSO contact the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities (315-443-3728), located at 310 Steele hall, for the appropriate procedure. Please note: All required readmission documentation (see below) must be received at least two full weeks prior to the beginning of the academic semester (and preferably sooner) in which the applicant wishes to enroll.

Fast Track Readmission

Fast Track Readmission can occur after a student has been suspended from the Falk College for one regular (fall or spring) semester. Students with a 1.5 cumulative grade point average or higher at the time of suspension from the Falk College are eligible to apply for the Fast Track to return to their declared major or undeclared status provided they meet the following conditions:

  • Students must pass a minimum of 9 credit hours of course work from an accredited institution in one regular semester (fall or spring).
  • All courses must be pre-approved by the student’s academic advisor in the Falk College and be applicable/transferable to the student’s existing program at Syracuse University.
  • Students must achieve a minimum of a 3.0 grade point average for the 9 (or more) credit hours and must achieve a minimum grade of “C” in a course (in order for it to transfer to SU).
Standard Readmission

Standard Readmission can occur after the student has been suspended from the Falk College for an academic year and the following requirements are met.

Students must:

  • Take a minimum of 12 credit hours of course work from an accredited institution during fall and/or spring semesters.
  • Achieve a minimum grade of “C” in each course in order to transfer credits back to SU.
  • Achieve a minimum GPA of 2.5 for all credits taken.
  • Have all courses pre-approved by their academic advisor and be applicable/transferable to the students’ existing program at Syracuse University.
 Readmission Materials and Procedure

The following materials must be submitted in order for a student to be considered for readmission:

  • An email or letter to the Assistant Dean requesting readmission and explaining the reasons that led to suspension and how these issues have been handled.

This correspondence should include:

  • Current email address, current residential address and a telephone number.
  • How you have occupied your time during your suspension.
  • Any health, mental health and/or substance abuse issues, learning disabilities, family/personal issues or other situations that compromised your ability to succeed academically.
  • If you have received supportive services (tutoring, therapy, medical treatment, etc.) while on suspension. If you did receive these services, written documentation from your provider will strengthen your readmission request.
  • Explain what you plan to do differently to become a successful student. Be honest and realistic when explaining why you believe your new strategies will work. Include specific behaviors that will help you recover from you poor academic performance. This may include whether and how your employment status, living arrangements and environment, study skills, and lifestyles or habits will change to increase you academic success.
  • An official transcript for the institution where the external course work occurred.

Emails should be sent to James Byrne, Assistant Dean, at jrbyrne@syr.edu.

Letters and official school transcripts should be sent to Syracuse University, Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, Attention James Byrne, Assistant Dean, Office of Student Services, 300 MacNaughton Hall, Syracuse, NY 13244.

Letters may also be faxed to 315-443-2562 to James Byrne’s attention.

All materials will be reviewed by the Assistant Dean, who will consult with the Chair of the Department where the student’s major is situated. Consideration will be on an individual basis and are especially rigorous for those students who have already experienced more than one academic suspension at the College and/or University. Students will be notified by the Assistant Dean when a decision has been made.

All readmitted students will be placed on One term Trial status (see information under Academic Probation tab) and will be required to see an academic support counselor in the Office of Students Services during the first week they return to school to review the terms of their readmission.

Once readmitted, students will be cleared to register for their first semester back and should contact their academic advisor to determine their course schedule.

Appendix I: NASW Standards and Indicators for Cultural Competence (2015)

Standards and Indicators for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice

The social work profession, and its primary practice organization, the National Association of Social Workers National Association of Social Workers, has a long history of addressing cultural competence. In 2015, they published a revision of two prior documents, Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice (2001) and Indicators for the achievement of the NASW Standards for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice (2007), combined into one publication. The Standards and Indicators for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice (2015) reflect the growth in understandings of cultural competence and related concepts since the earlier works. While the title retains the concept of “competence” (disputed language due to its implied end state of having arrived at mastery), they note, “As with any competency, there is the expectation of continual growth and learning” (p. 7).

The Standards and Indicators understand culture to be inclusive beyond race and ethnicity. Culture also includes sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, religious identity and spirituality, class, age, marital status, physical or emotional disability, language, country of origin and nationhood, among other dimensions. Cultural competence in social work practice implies a heightened consciousness of how culturally diverse populations experience their uniqueness and deal with their differences and similarities within the context of social systems and power structures that are often discriminatory, disrespectful, and punitive. You should read these standards with a critical eye, as you would any other document. Where do you see prejudice embedded in a document intended to resist it?

The ten Standards are:

Standard 1. Ethics and values

Social workers shall function in accordance with the values, ethics, and Standards of the NASW (2008/2017) Code of Ethics. NASW Code of Ethics Cultural competence requires self-awareness, cultural humility, and the commitment to understanding and embracing culture as central to effective practice.

Standard 2. Self-Awareness

Social workers shall demonstrate an appreciation of their own cultural identities and those of others. Social workers must also be aware of their own privilege and power and must acknowledge the impact of this privilege and power in their work with and on behalf of clients. Social workers will also demonstrate cultural humility and sensitivity to the dynamics of power and privilege in all areas of social work.

Standard 3. Cross-Cultural Knowledge

Social workers shall possess and continue to develop specialized knowledge and understanding that is inclusive of, but not limited to, the history, traditions, values, family systems, and artistic expressions such as race and ethnicity; immigration and refugee status; tribal groups; religion and spirituality; sexual orientation; gender identity or expression; social class; and mental or physical abilities of various cultural groups.

Standard 4. Cross-Cultural Skills

Social workers will use a broad range of skills (micro, mezzo, and macro) and techniques that demonstrate an understanding of and respect for the importance of culture in practice, policy, and research.

Standard 5. Service Delivery

Social workers shall be knowledgeable about and skillful in the use of services, resources, and institutions and be available to serve multicultural communities. They shall be able to make culturally appropriate referrals within both formal and informal networks and shall be cognizant of, and work to address, service gaps affecting specific cultural groups.

Standard 6. Empowerment and Advocacy

Social workers shall be aware of the impact of social systems, policies, practices, and programs on multicultural client populations, advocating for, with, and on behalf of multicultural clients and client populations whenever appropriate. Social workers should also participate in the development and implementation of policies and practice that empower and advocate for marginalized and oppressed populations.

Standard 7. Diverse Workforce

Social workers shall support and advocate for recruitment, admissions and hiring, and retention efforts in social work programs and organizations to ensure diversity within the profession.

Standard 8. Professional Education

Social workers shall advocate for, develop, and participate in professional education and training programs that advance cultural competence within the profession. Social workers should embrace cultural competence as a focus of lifelong learning.

Standard 9. Language and Communication

Social workers shall provide and advocate for effective communication with clients of all cultural groups, including people of limited English proficiency or low literacy skills, people who are blind or have low vision, people who are deaf of hard of hearing, and people with disabilities (Goode & Jones, 2009)

Standard 10. Leadership to Advance Cultural Competence

Social workers shall be change agents who demonstrate the leadership skills to work effectively with multicultural groups in agencies, organizational settings, and communities. Social workers should also demonstrate responsibility for advancing cultural competence within and beyond their organizations, helping to challenge structural and institutional oppression and build and sustain diverse and inclusive institutions and communities.

These ten standards open doors to complicated issues that will shape your professional practice as a social worker. This document offers an excellent beginning. To see the full text of the Standards and Indicators, go to Standards and Indicators for Cultural Competence in Social Work Practice.

Appendix J: Accountability for Professional Behavior

Standards of Professional Conduct and Behavior for Social Work Students

Syracuse University School of Social Work understands the personal and professional behavior of undergraduate students to be a reflection of their likely future performance as social work practitioners. The School of Social Work therefore considers ethical conduct and behavior as an aspect of academic student progress. Performance or behaviors that demonstrate poor interpersonal skills, unethical, threatening or otherwise unprofessional conduct are considered grounds for academic disciplinary action that may include, but is not limited to, academic probation and dismissal. The Code of Ethics as adopted by the National Association of Social Workers serves as the primary basis for judgments concerning the appropriateness of the behavior of students.

The School of Social Work policy, with respect to professional conduct and competence, is viewed as part of the ethical responsibility of the faculty to protect potential clients of its graduates from harm. In the field placement, the importance of the student-client relationship supersedes that of classroom performance. Unethical, threatening or otherwise unprofessional conduct will be closely examined. The school retains the right to take academic disciplinary action in accordance with the procedures described in this statement when the student's behavior indicates an inability to effectively communicate, and to develop the type of interpersonal relationships that are required in social work practice, as described in the BSSW Field Instruction Manual.

Academic Hearing Board

The School of Social Work policy for academic progress and professional behavior addresses the professional behavior and ethical conduct of both graduate and undergraduate students. The Academic Hearing Board of the School of Social Work is responsible for hearings arising from the implementation of School of Social Work policy in this area.

The purpose of the Academic Hearing Board is to hear and respond to allegations of unprofessional conduct or inadequate professional performance by a graduate or undergraduate student. These are both issues of concern because knowledge, skill, and value expectations can be considered academic criteria in a professional program as they relate to a student's likely performance as a social work practitioner. Applying a knowledge base in practice, demonstrating professional relationship skills, and behavior with clients and colleagues (in the agency or classroom) that is consistent with the values and ethics of the profession are all components of academic standing in a professional program. Inadequacies in these areas can affect standing in the BSSW or MSW program and be the basis upon which a hearing is convened.

Convening the Academic Hearing Board

The School of Social Work Academic Hearing Board shall convene when:

A member of the faculty or School administration submits a written request for a hearing based upon a student's unprofessional conduct or inadequate professional performance. A member of the faculty, the Director of Field Instruction, the Director of the Baccalaureate Social Work Program or another Social Work administrator initiates the process by submitting a written request to the Director of the School of Social Work. The request must outline briefly the basis for the hearing request. The Director of the School of Social Work reviews the request for a hearing, determining whether to proceed or not to proceed with the hearing. The Director of the School of Social Work will notify the requesting party of their decision. If permission to proceed with the hearing is given, the requesting party must then write a formal hearing letter to the student. This letter is sent to the student via certified, receipt requested mail.

Composition of the Academic Hearing Board

The Academic Hearing Board is comprised of three voting members, consisting of two full-time teaching faculty and one full-time professional field staff. All voting members serve on the Hearing Board in rotation. In instances where any of the members of the Hearing Board have direct involvement in the circumstances of the particular case at hand or other conflict of interest, that member shall recuse themselves and the Director shall appoint a substitute for that hearing.

Procedures of the Academic Hearing Board

  1. The Academic Hearing Board convenes at the beginning of the academic year and selects a chairperson from the faculty members. When there is a case to be heard, the chairperson convenes the Academic Hearing Board to conduct the hearing.
  2. The Director or Director’s designee notifies the student and the chairperson of the Academic Hearing Board of the request for a hearing, and where the request originated. The student is given the statement that forms the basis of the request for a hearing.
  3. The student is invited to appear before the Academic Hearing Board. Other persons also may be invited to appear as follows:
    1. In the case of a hearing based upon an allegation of unprofessional conduct or inadequate professional performance, the student may request that the Academic Hearing Board invite a faculty member, student, or other person with information relevant to the allegation to testify before the committee on the student's behalf.
    2. The Hearing Board may seek advisory testimony from any administrative or faculty sources within the School of Social Work or persons from the student’s field agency (where appropriate) regarding the behavior that forms the basis for a hearing on professional conduct.
  4. The Academic Hearing Board must reach a unanimous recommendation to
    1. Reverse the decision to dismiss the student, or
    2. Conditionally continue a student’s enrollment based on a plan, written and signed by the student, that
      1. Specifies feasible actions for meeting program requirements,
      2. Provides procedures for monitoring progress in executing those actions, and
      3. Provides a timetable for the completion of those actions, or
    3. Dismiss the student from the program
  5. The Academic Hearing Board conveys its written recommendation (including the mandated written plan for meeting program requirements where continued enrollment is permitted) to the Director and the student.
  6. Decisions of the Academic Hearing Board are final and exhaust appeals options in the School of Social Work. Other avenues of appeal may be available through the Falk College Grievance Policies and Procedures Manual and the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities

Issues Not Adjudicated by the School of Social Work Academic Hearing Board

The Academic Hearing Board will not hear the following:

  1. Appeals of faculty-imposed sanctions for academic dishonesty.
    Academic dishonesty is covered by the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics policy on academic integrity with appeal of faculty action heard by the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics College Grievance Committee.

  2. Appeals of the final grade awarded in a course.
    Grade appeals are heard by the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics College Grievance Committee.
  3. Appeals of determinations with regard to academic standing or student conduct made by the Falk College Grievance Committee, the Dean of the College, the University Judicial System, university committees outside of the College, or senior administrators of the University.

Appendix K: Grievance Procedures

Students are expected to abide by the Academic Integrity Policy of Syracuse University (Academic Integrity). Formal disciplinary and grievance procedures exist at both the College and University level for handling allegations of academic dishonesty or violation of other university policies. 

The document, Falk College Grievance Policies and Procedures Manual, issued by the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics, explains where different types of allegations are heard. The kinds of issues covered by University-wide offices outside of the School of Social Work and the College include accusations of sexual or racial harassment and violations of the Student Code of Conduct.  The College Grievance Committee is responsible for appeals of a grade, or of sanctions imposed by units within the College regarding academic dishonesty and unprofessional conduct. Additionally, the College Grievance Committee may adjudicate complaints involving academic dishonesty and unfair academic treatment of a student that come to it directly.

Student behaviors consistent with professional standards in human services professions are expected within the academic area and clinical or field practicum. Each department within the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics has its own statement of professional standards of behavior to which students are expected to conform. Procedures within each school or academic program are spelled out for the first response to allegations of professional misconduct. Violations of professional standards and integrity include, but are not limited to, the following behaviors: 1) entry to clinical/field placement before completion of clinical clearance and faculty approval, 2) violation of confidentiality, 3) breach of civil/courteous behavior, 4) failure to maintain drug and alcohol sobriety, 5) failure to practice safe and professional actions in clinical/field placement settings, 6) failure to be punctual and/or provide timely notifications of absence from clinical/field placement due to illness, 7) failure to follow agency standards of dress, language and institutional policies. Students engaged in research are expected to comply with all policies set by the Institutional Review Board and to the provisions of the academic integrity policy, and 8) BSSW students’ violation of the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics.

Procedures for Filing a Student Grievance or an Appeal of School Disciplinary Action

The two tables that follow describe the types of grievances that may be brought against a student or that may be brought by a student against another student or member of the faculty or staff. The authority for adjudicating each of these grievances is also listed.

The first table contains those grievances that are handled by offices or committees outside of the School of Social Work and the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics.

The second table lists those grievances handled by the student's department (e.g. School of Social Work) or by the College.

Appendix L: Barbara Richman Mirken New York City Social Work Immersion Trip

This three-day annual trip to New York City offers students in the BSSW Program an educational opportunity to experience both historical and contemporary sites that bring to life the role of social work in the urban environment of Manhattan.

This experience was first initiated in 2002, when Barbara Mirken’s gift to the School of Social Work made the opportunity possible. After Barbara’s death, her husband Alan B. Mirken continued to fund this special experience for students. Thanks to the Barbara Richman Mirken Seminar Endowed Fund, there is no cost to participating students. In 2019, the Mirken daughters, Leslie Rubin and Jane Zenker, joined in the activities of the trip, further enriching the students’ experience.

Eligibility

To participate in the trip, you must be a second, third, or fourth-year undergraduate student majoring in social work. You must be in good academic standing with a GPA of 2.7 or better.  Students on academic probation are not eligible. The trip is held in the spring semester, and you must be enrolled as a student in the semester that you participate. You will receive an announcement and an invitation to apply shortly after classes resume in January. The Baccalaureate Program Director reviews applications, makes selections, and creates a waiting list if necessary. Because students share double hotel rooms, gender diversity is considered in finalizing selections.

Logistics

Students travel by bus to New York City, accompanied by the Baccalaureate Program Director, a Graduate Assistant, and two or more faculty or staff members. Lodging is within walking distance of some sites; bus transportation will be provided to others. There is a structured itinerary for the trip, which will be reviewed at a mandatory pre-trip meeting. Roommates are also selected at that meeting. All housing, meals, and activities are paid for by the Mirken Endowment.

If you are chosen for the trip, you will miss classes and/or field hours on a Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. It is up to you to talk to your professors and field instructors prior to the trip to make arrangements to make up missed assignments, course content, deadlines or field hours. The NYC Immersion Trip Cannot be counted as community experience (SWK 301) or field practicum (SWK 435-SWK 445) hours.

Itinerary

Each year, this immersion trip features a mix of social work-relevant learning experiences and cultural events in New York City. Students interact with a panel of social workers who serve in a wide range of programs and roles at Mt. Sinai Hospital, redefining the boundaries of medical social work. They visit programs sponsored by the Goddard Riverside Community Center, and meet clients of selected programs and hear their stories. Group meals range from formal events at Lubin House or a nice restaurant to sharing lunch with elders at the Goddard Riverside Senior Center. When feasible, students have the opportunity to meet members of the Falk Board of Visitors. We include social-work relevant history with visits to sites such as the Tenement Museum or Stonewall National Monument. Last but not least, we incorporate the arts. Each year a Broadway play or musical is selected that highlights aspects of the human condition relating to the practice of social work.

Competency-based Experience

The trip supports student mastery of CSWE Competencies 1-3. It immerses students in both historic and practice settings that illustrate intersectionality among multiple dimensions of diversity and across multiple levels of social work practice (Competency 2). The agencies we visit illustrate the breadth of professional social work practice, and reveal stories of human rights and social, economic, environmental, and intergenerational justice (Competency 3). In representing Syracuse University, students demonstrate respectful and attentive professional demeanor (Competency 1). The experience concludes with a critical reflection essay.

Appendix M:  Legislative Policy Day

James L. Stone Legislative Policy Symposium

For the last 20 years, the Syracuse School of Social Work has hosted the James L. Stone Legislative Policy Symposium. This annual event is held in the Onondaga County Legislative Chambers at the Onondaga County Courthouse in downtown Syracuse and typically runs from 8:30 AM to 4:15PM, with a light breakfast and lunch provided. The Policy Symposium is an exciting part of the school’s curriculum and is a prime example of how faculty model the behavior and values of the profession in the program’s educational environment through their engagement with various communities in service and scholarship. It involves students, faculty, featured speakers, and guests in exploring an important social issue as well as the involvement and responsibility of social workers in advocating for, developing, and implementing social policies that respond to the needs of individuals, families, vulnerable populations, and communities. It also provides a chance to network and get to know fellow students, faculty, and presenters. This event is an exceptionally valuable piece of your educational experience. You will be required to attend at least one Symposium prior to graduation. Typically, attendance is mandated for BSSW seniors.

Each year, the Symposium focuses on a topic of national, state, and local relevance. This past year’s symposium (October 2018) titled—The Many Faces of Homelessness in New York State: What’s Being Done, What Works, and What More Needs to be Done—focused on the intersection of state and local housing, behavioral health, public assistance, and related policies and services for addressing homelessness within the state.

Other recent topics have included: In Our Central New York Backyards: Political, Policy and Community Responses to the Opioid Epidemic (2017); Gun Violence in the City: Community Relations, Trauma, Neighborhood Activism and Racial Justice (2016); Immigrant Rights, Politics and Legislation: How Fare New York’s Undocumented Adults and Children? (2016); and Criminalizing New Yorkers with Severe Mental Illness: Where is Dorothea Dix When We Need Her? (2013).

These legislative symposia have been made possible through the generous contribution of our distinguished alumnus, James L. Stone, MSW class of 1965, past chair of the Board of Visitors of the David B. Falk College of Sport and Human Dynamics. Mr. Stone has held many important posts, including serving as Commissioner of the New York State Office of Mental Health.

Appendix N:  Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award

Each March, in commemoration of National Professional Social Work Month, the School of Social Work presents its Dan and Mary Lou Rubenstein Social Justice Award. Presented for more than 30 years, the Rubenstein Social Justice Award is given to honor the memories of Professor Dan Rubenstein, a former faculty member in the School of Social Work, and his wife Mary Lou, a former school social worker. Students are welcome to attend this event, which is free and open to the public.

Each event has a theme, a keynote speaker, and one or two honorees. In 2019, the theme was, “Overcoming Adversity: Embracing Resilience and Social Change.” The keynote speaker was Colonel Parker Schenecker, United State Army (Retired). In 2018, honoree Al-amin Muhammad presented the keynote address on the theme, “Many faces, many stories: The lived experiences of people who are homeless.” In 2017, honoree Beth Broadway’s keynote addressed the theme, “Building bridges of understanding in a divided time—challenges facing immigrants and refugees and how our community can help.”

Recipients of this award are role models whose courage and strength inspire other to stand up and step up to advocate and be a voice fin the Syracuse community. The values of social justice are integral to their daily lives. The work of honorees exemplify the true spirit of the Rubenstein Social Justice Award. Recent honorees include: Mothers Against Gun Violence (2019), A Tiny Home for Good, Inc. (2019), Al-amin Muhammad, founder of We Rise Above the Streets Recovery Outreach (2018), The Rescue Mission Alliance of Syracuse, NY (2018), Beth Broadway, President and CEO of Interfaith Works of CNY (2017), and Clifford Ryans, founder of O.G.’s against Gun Violence (2017).

In celebrating the commitment of the Rubensteins to social justice, the School of Social Work recognizes those who best reflect the lives of Dan and May Lou Rubenstein and who challenge our community to respond to continuing issues of poverty, human rights, racial equality, and related social problems.

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