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Director:
Nancy Rindfuss, M.A., R.D.N., C.D.N.
554 White Hall
(315) 443-2269
napaul@syr.edu


This program is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics, the accrediting agency for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Table of Contents

Introduction to the Program

This handbook has been developed to assist nutrition students who intend to become a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (R.D.N.). This information is a supplement to other College and University publications, which contain official policies and procedures. These other publications include the undergraduate/graduate catalog, the student handbook, schedule of classes, and the college handbook.

The Department of Nutrition and Food Studies faculty and staff would like to extend a warm welcome to all incoming students and look forward to working with each student through a student-centered professional development program. Each student’s success in this program and in attaining R.D.N. status is ultimately the responsibility of the student. Utilizing this and all resources available is highly encouraged. Specific program information can be found at the Nutrition Science and Dietetics website.

Undergraduate Transfer Student

Information is available on the Admissions web page. Transcripts are evaluated for transfer credit during that process. Please meet with the D.P.D. Director within the first few weeks of beginning your classes for an introduction to the program and its requirements.

Prospective Masters Student

Start by emailing Nancy Rindfuss. She will provide you with further information about the program, collect your transcript(s), assist you with the application process and answer your questions about the D.P.D./Master’s Program. Your transcripts will be reviewed by the D.P.D. Director to determine the number of pre-requisites completed and those still left to complete. The graduate program does not accept spring admissions due to the sequencing of the coursework. The Graduate Coursework Allowing for D.P.D. Verification Form found within this handbook provides the D.P.D. requirements for the graduate student. If you are an international student, you must have your transcript reviewed by one of these agencies Foreign Degree Evaluation Agencies in order to have your academic degree validated as equivalent to the bachelor's or master's degree conferred by a U.S. regionally-accredited college or university. The summary section of the agency report must state "Regionally Accredited Institution."

Freshman, Sophomore and Transfer Students

We suggest you read the entire D.P.D. Program Handbook and use it throughout your academic career at Syracuse University. Print the sections you need and bring them to your advising meetings. The sections of greatest importance to you right now include The Field of Dietetics; Our Nutrition Program; Volunteer and Work Experiences.

Junior, Senior and Graduate Students

Review the entire D.P.D. Program Handbook, however, focus primarily on the following sections: Completing the program, Volunteer and Extra Curricular Experiences (including the Portfolio), and Supervised Practice Programs: Dietetic Internships.

The Field of Dietetics

Dietetics is the high-tech science of applying food and nutrition to health. It is a vital, growing field open to creativity and opportunity –– and the possibilities are endless. Health, nutrition, and fitness have become a way of life. People want to feel and look good. Eating right for a healthier lifestyle and learning about good nutrition are top priorities, and people are eager to learn even more. These changes mean increased opportunities in the field of dietetics.

Dietetics professionals work in healthcare, education and research. They work in sales, marketing and public relations. Registered dietitian nutritionists also work in government, restaurant management, fitness, food companies, and in private practice. The direction you take, and how far you take it, is your choice.

If you enjoy working with people and have a strong interest in food and nutrition, you will enjoy a career as a registered dietitian. In addition, if you have good judgment and an understanding of human nature, the motivation and initiative to work independently, and the ability to identify and solve problems, dietetics offers variety and challenge.

Biology, anatomy, physiology, and chemistry courses will be extremely important throughout your career. Math, writing, social science, psychology, and business courses are also important. As you build this liberal arts core, you will also develop a thorough understanding of the nutrition field as it applies to community and clinical nutrition and food service management.

There are a number of pathways you can choose to enter the field of dietetics. If you want to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, you can choose between enrolling in a Coordinated Program or a Didactic Program in Dietetics. A Coordinated Program is a bachelor or master’s degree program that combines classroom and supervised practical experience, and is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (Academy). Graduates are eligible to take the Registration Examination for Dietitians to obtain credentials as a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. A Didactic Program in Dietetics (D.P.D.) is an academic program, providing at a minimum a bachelor’s degree that is accredited by ACEND. Graduates of accredited D.P.D. Programs then complete an accredited Dietetic Internship (D.I.), supervised practice program. Dietetic Internships are competitive and acceptance is not guaranteed. Upon successful completion of a Dietetic Internship, you are then eligible to take the credentialing exam. The Dietetic Technician Program is a two-year associate degree program that combines classroom and supervised practical experience, and is approved or accredited by ACEND. Students who obtain D.P.D. verification are eligible to take the Registration Examination for Dietetic Technicians to obtain credentials as a Dietetic Technician, Registered (D.T.R.), under the Pathway III model offered by the Commission of Dietetic Registration (C.D.R.). Syracuse University has D.P.D. (undergraduate and graduate) and D.I. programs; we do not have a Coordinated Program. Attached are the pathways recognized by The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist. Please note that in order to be eligible for the D.T.R. exam you must earn D.P.D. Verification first. Please contact Nancy Rindfuss after graduation if you are interested in applying to take the D.T.R. exam.

Becoming a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist: A Food and Nutrition Expert 

Educational and Professional Requirements

Registered dietitians/nutritionists (R.D.N.s) are food and nutrition experts who have met the following four criteria to earn and maintain the R.D.N. credential.

  1. Complete a minimum of a bachelor's degree at a U.S. regionally accredited university or college and course work approved by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The curriculum is based upon the foundation knowledge for didactic content. The 2017 ACEND Standards for Didactic Programs in Nutrition and Dietetics.
  2. Complete an ACEND-accredited supervised practice program at a healthcare facility, community agency, or a foodservice corporation, or combined with undergraduate or graduate studies. The supervised practice program is based upon the competencies for entry-level dietitians found in the 2017 ACEND Standards for Internship Programs in Nutrition and Dietetics. Typically, a supervised practice program will run 10-12 months in length.
  3. Pass a national examination administered by C.D.R. Information on the Test Specifications can be found on the C.D.R. website.
  4. Complete continuing professional educational requirements to maintain registration.
    1. Complete 75 credits every 5 years

Nutritionist is a title used by nutrition professionals who typically work in the community for a government program, business or health association (American Heart Association, National Dairy Council, Women, Infants and Children). It is important to note, however, that the title “nutritionist” can be used by anyone and does not require a person to have background or credentials in nutrition. Use of the job title “nutritionist” is no indication that the employer does or does not require applicants to be registered dietitians (R.D.s). Anyone using the title “dietitian” must be certified as an R.D.N. by C.D.R. In a community or business setting, being an R.D.N. is not always a requirement.

Some R.D.N.s hold additional certifications in specialized areas of practice, such as pediatric or renal nutrition, nutrition support, and diabetes education. These certifications are awarded through C.D.R., the credentialing agency for the Academy, and/or other medical and nutrition organizations and are recognized within the profession, but are not required.

In addition to R.D.N. credentialing, many states have regulatory laws for dietitians and nutrition practitioners. Frequently these state requirements are met through the same education and training required to become an R.D.N. New York State R.D.N.s are currently trying to pass legislation to become licensed in this state. See the ACEND website for a summary of State Licensure Statutes.

The Commission on Dietetic Registration (C.D.R.) decided in 2013 to change the entry-level registration eligibility requirements for dietitians from a baccalaureate degree to a minimum of a graduate degree starting January 1, 2024. The routes to R.D.N. Registration Eligibility for taking the R.D.N. credentialing exam can be found on the C.D.R. website. Those that hold the registered dietitian credential prior to 2024 will not be required to complete a master’s degree when the master’s degree requirement becomes effective.

Future Education Model Program in Nutrition and Dietetics

Syracuse University has applied to open a new and exciting program in August, 2023 to prepare Registered Dietitian Nutritionists.

The Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) released the Future Education Model Accreditation Standards for programs in nutrition and dietetics. These accreditation standards integrate didactic coursework with supervised experiential learning in a competency-based curriculum designed to prepare nutrition and dietetics practitioners for future practice.

Syracuse University demonstrated its leadership in education by submitting an application to be part of the third cohort of programs to be accredited by ACEND under these new standards. The ACEND Board has approved our phase 1 application and will make a final accreditation decision on the program in 2022 after review of our phase 2 report.

If successful, following the phase 2 report review by the ACEND Board, we will begin recruiting students during the 2022-2023 academic year.

Contact Nancy Rindfuss, napaul@syr.edu, (315) 443-2269 for more information.

Employment Opportunities in Dietetics

The majority of R.D.N.s work in the treatment and prevention of disease — administering medical nutrition therapy (M.N.T.) as part of medical teams — often in hospitals, health-maintenance organizations, private practice or other health care facilities. In addition, many R.D.N.s work in community and public health settings and academia and research, with a growing number working with food and nutrition industry and business, journalism, sports nutrition, corporate wellness programs and other non-traditional work settings.

Hospitals

As part of the health care team, R.D.N.s working in the hospital setting educate patients about nutrition, administer medical nutrition therapy, provide nutrition support and evaluate critical care. They may also manage the foodservice operations in these settings, overseeing everything from food purchasing and preparation to managing staff.

Schools

Learning the importance of good nutrition early on is key for lifelong health. R.D.N.s often work as school foodservice directors, or work closely with the director, to create healthy menus and help administrators create and revise wellness policies. They also teach classes and develop nutrition education programming for students and faculty.

Community and Public Health Centers

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists can be found at community health centers and public health settings teaching, monitoring and advising the public and helping improve their quality of life through healthy eating habits. They also work at Head Start and Early Childhood Education Programs guiding childhood nutrition programs.

Senior Living

Believe it or not, Medicare regulations actually mandate that nursing homes employ a registered dietitian nutritionist. As such, R.D.N.s are key members of the care team, evaluating the overall menu and catering to the diets of high-risk residents.

Fitness Centers

Registered dietitian nutritionists looking for a captive audience often find just that while working at fitness centers, where they educate clients about the connection between food, fitness and health. Many also are certified in fitness or own their own fitness center. Beyond the gym, R.D.N.s are often hired to work with professional sports teams on menu planning, weight management, performance enhancement, recovery and medical nutrition therapy to complement athletes' training.

Food and Nutrition-Related Business

In food and nutrition-related businesses and industries, R.D.N.s work in communications, consumer affairs, public relations, marketing, product development or consulting with chefs in restaurants and culinary schools. Supermarkets employ R.D.N.s to provide in-store nutrition counseling and answer customers' dietary questions.

Universities

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists with a classroom calling often teach physician's assistants, nurses, dietetics students, dentists and others the sophisticated science of food and nutrition.

Research

Whether at food or pharmaceutical companies, universities or hospitals, R.D.N.s who choose to go into the research field will find themselves directing or conducting experiments to answer critical nutrition questions and find alternative foods or nutrition recommendations for the public.

Private Practice and Consulting

Many R.D.N.s are drawn to the field as a way to be their own boss. Working under contract with health care or food companies or in their own business, R.D.N.s may provide services to foodservice or restaurant managers, food vendors and distributors, athletes, long term care residents or company employees. Private practice R.D.N.s provide individual client counseling, too, and may work with physician offices providing medical nutrition therapy.

Culinary

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists bring a scientific and practical understanding of food and nutrition to the culinary landscape, making them extremely well equipped to take on the challenge of training to become a chef or cook. Many world-renowned chefs, recognizing the need to understand how the food they cook affects their customers, seek out nutrition education and eventually combine their passions as R.D.N.s. The public’s interest in food demonstrations that combine cooking skill and nutrition education are increasing.

Media

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are often called on by major media outlets as expert sources on food and nutrition and may be asked to serve as spokespeople for the Academy, acting as the face of the association. They also may be asked to serve as contributing editors for print and online publications, and some are journalists themselves. Plus, hundreds of R.D.N.s are published book authors. Many have private blogs and webpages.

Integrative and Functional Medicine

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists with an interest in an integrated and personalized approach to nutrition, health and healing may be interested in the field of Integrative and Functional Medicine. The philosophy centers on a holistic "food as medicine" approach to wellness, and is based in the integrative medicine model, centered on whole-food therapies, targeted supplements and mind-body modalities.

Nutrition Informatics

Registered Dietitian Nutritionists are heavily involved in the field of nutrition informatics, working to enhance the retrieval, organization, storage and optimum use of information, data and knowledge for food and nutrition-related problem solving and decision-making.

Salaries and Job Outlook

According to the Academy's 2017 Dietetics Compensation and Benefits Survey, the median salary for all R.D.s responding to the 2017 survey was $63,340 ($30.45/hour). As with any profession, salaries and fees vary by region of the country, employment settings, scope of responsibility, and supply of R.D.N.s.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dietitians and nutritionists is projected to grow 15 percent from 2016 to 2026, faster than the average for all occupations. The role of food in preventing and treating illnesses, such as diabetes, is now well known. More dietitians and nutritionists will be needed to provide care for patients with various medical conditions and to advise people who want to improve their overall health.

The Didactic Program in Dietetics at Syracuse University

The Syracuse University Didactic Program in Dietetics (D.P.D.) is a nutrition program accredited by the Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) under the Standards of Education as meeting academic requirements leading to at least a bachelor's degree. Upon program completion, graduates receive a Bachelor of Science degree in Nutrition. When verified by the program director, a D.P.D. graduate may apply to a supervised practice (dietetic internship) program. Successful completion of supervised practice establishes eligibility to write the registration examination and be a member in the Academy. (Please see the D.P.D. Verification Policies in the section Graduate Coursework Allowing for D.P.D. Verification at Syracuse University and under the Policy for D.P.D. Verification Form).

D.P.D. Program Mission/Philosophy

The mission of the Didactic Program in Dietetics (D.P.D.) is to prepare students to successfully enter dietetic internships that leads to eligibility for the C.D.R. credentialing exam to become a registered dietitian nutritionist, food and nutrition careers, or graduate school through a student-centered professional development program with a broad liberal arts base.

The ACEND 2017 Knowledge Requirements for the Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (K.R.D.N.s)

All of these knowledge requirements are taught throughout the D.P.D. curriculum. The classes these are taught in are determined by the faculty and staff through peer-reviewed faculty curriculum assessment.

Domain 1 -  Scientific and Evidence Base of Practice: Integration of scientific information and translation of research into practice.

K.R.D.N. 1.1 Demonstrate how to locate, interpret, evaluate and use professional literature to make ethical, evidence-based practice decisions.

K.R.D.N. 1.2 Use current information technologies to locate and apply evidence-based guidelines and protocols.

K.R.D.N. 1.3 Apply critical thinking skills.

Domain 2 - Professional Practice Expectations: Beliefs, values, attitudes and behaviors for the professional dietitian nutritionist level of practice.

K.R.D.N. 2.1 Demonstrate effective and professional oral and written communication and documentation.

K.R.D.N. 2.2 Describe the governance of nutrition and dietetics practice, such as the Scope of Nutrition and Dietetics Practice and the Code of Ethics for the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics; and describe inter-professional relationships in various practice settings.

K.R.D.N. 2.3 Assess the impact of a public policy position on nutrition and dietetics practice.

K.R.D.N. 2.4 Discuss the impact of health care policy and different health care delivery systems on food and nutrition services.

K.R.D.N. 2.5 Identify and describe the work of inter-professional teams and the roles of others with whom the registered dietitian nutritionist collaborates in the delivery of food and nutrition services.

K.R.D.N. 2.6 Demonstrate an understanding of cultural competence/sensitivity.

K.R.D.N. 2.7 Demonstrate identification with the nutrition and dietetics profession through activities such as participation in professional organizations and defending a position on issues impacting the nutrition and dietetics profession.

K.R.D.N. 2.8 Demonstrate an understanding of the importance and expectations of a professional in mentoring and precepting others.

Domain 3 - Clinical and Customer Services: Development and delivery of information, products and services to individuals, groups and populations.

K.R.D.N. 3.1 Use the Nutrition Care Process to make decisions, identify nutrition-related problems and determine and evaluate nutrition interventions.

K.R.D.N. 3.2 Develop an educational session or program/educational strategy for a target population.

K.R.D.N. 3.3 Demonstrate counseling and education methods to facilitate behavior change and enhance wellness for diverse individuals and groups.

K.R.D.N. 3.4 Explain the processes involved in delivering quality food and nutrition services.

K.R.D.N. 3.5 Describe basic concepts of nutritional genomics.

Domain 4. Practice Management and Use of Resources: Strategic application of principles of management and systems in the provision of services to individuals and organizations.

K.R.D.N. 4.1 Apply management theories to the development of programs or services.

K.R.D.N. 4.2 Evaluate a budget and interpret financial data.

K.R.D.N. 4.3 Describe the regulation system related to billing and coding, what services are reimbursable by third party payers, and how reimbursement may be obtained.

K.R.D.N. 4.4 Apply the principles of human resource management to different situations.

K.R.D.N. 4.5 Describe safety principles related to food, personnel and consumers.

K.R.D.N. 4.6 Analyze data for assessment and evaluate data to be used in decision-making for continuous quality improvement.

The program’s curriculum must provide learning activities to attain the breadth and depth of the required curriculum components and core knowledge. Syllabi for courses taught within the academic unit must include these learning activities with the associated K.R.D.N.s.

  1. Learning activities must prepare students for professional practice with patients/clients with various conditions, including, but not limited to overweight and obesity; endocrine disorders; cancer; malnutrition and cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and renal diseases. 
  2. Learning activities must prepare students to implement the Nutrition Care Process with various populations and diverse cultures, including infants, children, adolescents, adults, pregnant/lactating females and older adults. 
  3. Learning activities must use a variety of educational approaches necessary for delivery of curriculum content, to meet learner needs and to facilitate learning objectives.

D.P.D. Program Goals & Outcome Measures

  1. The program will prepare graduates who fulfill the Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements within a Liberal Arts core to apply for a Dietetic Internship and/or Graduate School or secure employment.
  2. The program will assure graduates are prepared for the Dietetic Internship.
  3. The program will prepare graduates to continually participate in professional education, services and growth.

Program outcome data is available upon request by contacting the program director.

Program Goal One:

The program will prepare graduates who fulfill the Didactic Program in Dietetics requirements within a Liberal Arts core to apply for a Dietetic Internship and/or Graduate school or secure employment.

Outcome Measures

Upon exit survey, D.P.D. graduates will rank the average scores > 3.75 with a scale of 1-5 (1=Poor, 5=Outstanding) for the following program outcomes:

    • Prepared for Internship
    • Recommend Program
    • Effective Guidance/Advising
    • Flexible Program
    • Sufficient Opportunities for volunteering

Upon exit survey, alumni will rank the average scores > 3.75 with a scale of 1-5 (1=Poor, 5=Outstanding) for the following program outcomes:

    • Prepared for Internship
    • Recommend Program
    • Effective Guidance/Advising
    • Sufficient Opportunities for volunteering

At least 80% of program students complete the program/degree requirements within 6 years (150% of program length).

50% of program graduates apply for admission to a supervised practice program prior to or within 12 months of graduation.

80% of program graduates are admitted to a supervised practice program within 12 months of graduation.

85% of program graduates applying to graduate school will be accepted.

50% of our program graduates will work toward the completion of a minor/certificate.

35% of our program graduates will study abroad.

Program Goal Two:

The program will assure graduates are prepared for the Dietetic Internship.

Outcome Measures

Average scores will be > 3.75 on a scale of 1-5 for program outcomes:

  • Prepared for Internship
  • Program graduates rate the D.P.D. program on the level of preparation regarding the 2017 ACEND Knowledge Requirements

Average scores will be > 3.75 on a scale of 1-5 for program outcomes:

  • Prepared for Internship
  • Internship Directors rate the graduates on the level of preparation regarding the 2017 ACEND Knowledge Requirements

Average scores will be > 3.75 on a scale of 1-5 for program outcomes:

  • Prepared for Internship
  • Alumni rate the D.P.D. program on their level of preparation to perform the 2017 ACEND Knowledge Requirements 

The program’s one-year pass rate (graduates who pass the registration exam within one year of first attempt) on the C.D.R. credentialing exam for dietitian nutritionists is at least 80%

Program Goal Three:

The program will prepare graduates to continually participate in professional education, service and growth.

Outcome Measures

Program graduates will give average score > 3.75 on a scale of 1-5 (1=Poor; 5 = Outstanding)

  • Lifelong learning

50% of program graduates will be a member of the Academy

50% of program graduates will intend to pursue advanced education

50% of alumni will report completion or intent to complete advanced education

50% of alumni who are R.D.s will report involvement in activities to advance the field (M.N.T./licensure advocacy; etc.)

50% of program alumni who are R.D.s will hold leadership positions

N.S.D. Faculty, Adjuncts and Staff 

View an online listing of Faculty and Professional Staff

View an online listing of Administrative Staff

Accreditation Status

The Didactic Program in Dietetics at Syracuse University is accredited by the Accreditation Council of Education in Nutrition and Dietetics (ACEND) of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2190, Chicago, Illinois 60606-6995, ACEND@eatright.org, 1-800-877-1600X5400). Our program was granted full accreditation in 2010 for a 10-year period. The Standards of Education, upon which the program is designed, are based upon the foundation knowledge for didactic content.

Projected Program Costs

Based on the 2019-2020 figures, the cost is approximately $74,799 for an undergraduate student and $51,033 for a graduate student.

Costs are subject to change. Check with the Admissions and Housing Offices for updates. The student should be prepared to pay the necessary fees to complete the D.P.D. Program. Expenses for attending Syracuse University as an undergraduate and graduate student can be found at Cost of Attendance.

(D.P.D.) Undergraduate Students 

Direct Costs

Estimated Costs

Tuition$52,210
Housing and Meals$15,910
Miscellaneous Fees$1,639
Health Insurance$1,730
Indirect Costs (estimate)
Books and Supplies$1,536
Transportation$698
Personal Expenses$1,076
Total Direct & Indirect Costs$74,799
Additional Costs (not included in calculation)
Laboratory course fees (estimated)$215
Associate Membership$58
Student Professional Liability Insurance (Jr. & Sr.)$25/yr
Dietetic Internship Application Fees (varies)$500

(D.P.D.) Graduate Students 

Direct CostsEstimated Costs
Tuition$29,160
Fees$868
Housing$10,121
Meals$3,835
Health Insurance$1,730
Indirect Costs
Books/Supplies$939
Personal expenses$2,039
Transportation$1,481
Loan Fee$860
Total Direct & Indirect Costs$51,033
Additional Costs (not included in calculation)
Associate Membership$58
Dietetic Internship Application Fees (varies)$500

Financial Aid

Information about financial aid and loan deferment can be found at the Office of Financial Aid and Scholarship Programs.

Undergraduate Advising

One of the nutrition faculty will be assigned as your faculty advisor. If you are a First-Year student, you will be assigned to both a First-Year Academic Advisor (Malissa Monahan in Falk Student Services) and a Faculty Advisor. Your Academic Advisor will help you with course selection and registration during your first year at S.U. and your Faculty Advisor will help you with any questions or concerns regarding your major and career options during the first year. After your 1st year, you will transition to having only a Faculty Advisor. The academic calendar guides the timing of advising, registration, vacations, program schedule and exams. Your advisor is committed to providing you the individual advice and assistance that you need at every step throughout your degree program. A successful system of academic advising is highly dependent upon a shared commitment and exchange of timely information from the student, faculty, and staff.

Students are responsible for scheduling, preparing for, and keeping advising appointments, seeking out contacts and information, and knowing the basic requirements of their individual degree programs. Students bear the final responsibility for making their own decisions based on the best information and advice available and, ultimately, on their own judgment.

Advisors are responsible for developing a thorough knowledge of the institution, including academic requirements, program options, and general University resources. Advisors are expected to involve students by encouraging them to ask questions, gather information, and explore options so that they may develop a meaningful academic plan. For more information on academic advising, see the Falk website. Degree Works found in MySlice is available for each student to monitor their degree progress.

Advisors will:

  • assist in the planning of your schedule each semester, 
  • be available to students on a regular basis, 
  • monitor their advisees' progress, including faculty notifications via Orange Success,
  • assist in considering career options,
  • make appropriate referrals to other campus offices, and
  • counsel students into career paths appropriate to their ability when necessary.

Academic Support and Falk Student Support Services

Although your advisor can guide you when you are having difficulty with classes or other issues on campus, there are also a variety of resources and supports in place to help you. Orange SUccess and Degree Works, found in MySlice, are good resources. For program operations, see the Course Catalog. A leave of absence may be initiated through Falk Student Services. The Falk Student Services Department can assist and guide you in many ways from tutoring services, personal support, processing forms, counseling services, and testing support. They are located at 300 MacNaughton Hall. The Assistant Dean of Student Services is Mr. James Byrne and is located in the same office, (315) 443-2077. A list of resources can be accessed at Falk Students.

Career Services

There are several resources available to current students and alumni in the Career Services Department such as scheduling a personal “mock” professional interview and resume critique. Visit the Career Services website or their office (Schine Student Center, Suite 235) for more information.

Completing the Program

Verification Policy

To insure D.P.D. students are appropriately prepared for a supervised practice program and the field of dietetics, the Nutrition Science and Dietetics program has instituted a verification policy. During one of your first advising meetings with your advisor, you will review and sign a copy of the Verification policy. The current policy forms for undergraduates and graduate students are included in this handbook. For those students who have taken courses several years ago — your transcript will be evaluated on an individual basis to determine eligibility for D.P.D. Verification.

Senior Exit Exam

To ensure D.P.D. students are appropriately prepared for a supervised practice program and the field of dietetics, the Department of Nutrition and Food Studies has instituted a final exit exam that covers the entire nutrition curriculum (which is similar to the R.D. exam). You will take this exam when you are enrolled in Senior Seminar II (N.S.D. 477) which is typically in the spring of your senior year. This exam will assess the knowledge you acquired from the four-year nutrition program. It is typically an objective test with approximately 125 multiple-choice questions. It is advisable that you save your materials/notes/books from each N.S.D. class. These will also be helpful when you review for the R.D.N. exam. You must pass the senior exam with a score of 70% or higher and will have two opportunities to do so. (This exam is for undergraduate students only - the master’s D.P.D. students take a comprehensive exam).

Evaluating the D.P.D. Nutrition Program

At the end of each class, you will have an opportunity to anonymously evaluate the class and your professor and provide constructive, professional feedback. Additionally, prior to graduation, you will evaluate the D.P.D. nutrition program for how well it prepared you. We value your feedback and look forward to your input. If you have suggestions to enhance the program beyond these opportunities, please feel free to make your suggestions to the department chair or director of the D.P.D. program.

D.P.D. Course Sequence

The sequence of classes you take as an undergraduate D.P.D. student are included in this manual. (Please see the sections D.P.D. Nutrition Undergraduate Spring Study Abroad Course Sequence - Option II and Graduate Coursework Allowing for D.P.D. Verification at Syracuse University) Sequencing is based upon pre-requisites and some classes may be offered only in the Spring or only in the Fall (see the section Suggested D.P.D. Course Sequence by Year and Pre-Requisites). Come to your advising meetings with a basic plan of what you would like to take based upon this schedule or the one prepared for you if you are a transfer student. Be warned that if you take matters into your own hands (e.g. dropping classes or taking alternative courses), that you might jeopardize when you can finish the D.P.D. program or if you will be verified. Typically, students complete their undergraduate degree in four (4) years. An alternative sequence can be designed with your faculty advisor to fit your study abroad, minor and/or double major plans. (Please see the section D.P.D. Nutrition Undergraduate Fall Study Abroad Course Sequence - Option I) The sequence for graduate students desiring D.P.D. verification is also included in this manual and is based upon an evaluation of your undergraduate transcripts. (Please see the section D.P.D. Nutrition Undergraduate Spring Study Abroad Course Sequence - Option II) Contact Nancy Rindfuss to have your undergraduate transcript evaluated. The identification of pre-requisites allowing for D.P.D. verification should be completed prior to starting in the master’s program. (Please see the section Graduate Coursework Allowing for D.P.D. Verification at Syracuse University.)

International Students

Students with an international bachelor’s degree must have their transcripts evaluated by a foreign degree evaluation agency found on the ACEND website. The summary section of the evaluation report must state from a "regionally accredited institution." Have the evaluation sent to the D.P.D. Director, 554 White Hall, Syracuse NY 13244.

Other Academic Options

Transfer Credits

Many students like to take a course or two at their local community college over the summer. This can lighten your load during the semester and can allow you to focus on difficult topics with fewer distractions. Be sure to get any summer/community college classes approved before you take it so that you can be sure it will transfer. Make an appointment with your advisor, bring a copy of the course descriptions and complete the necessary paperwork to obtain approval. You must earn a grade of C or better to transfer the credits in. The grade does not transfer in and does not factor in to your G.P.A. at S.U. You must provide your official transcript to the S.U. College Recorders to receive credit for the course completed. For additional Transfer Credit Information for Falk College Students, see the Falk College website.

Double Majors

Some nutrition students have completed double majors. The most popular option is a double with Exercise Science or one of the Newhouse majors. If planned early in your career here, this can be completed in a solid five years. Doubling is a serious commitment to two disciplines. Since nutrition is very structured, you might want to consider all your options besides doubling for how you can achieve your academic goals. You could consider a minor or pursing the other interest in graduate school.

Minors

A minor typically requires the completion of 18 credits. Popular choices for a minor combined with nutrition include: Gerontology (Interdisciplinary), Psychology, Health and Wellness, Child and Family Policy, and Management Studies. Others have included: Entrepreneurship, Food Studies and Policy Studies. Refer to your undergraduate catalog for a full list of minor programs. Depending upon what you choose to study some of the credits might already count toward part of your degree requirements. Due to Liberal Arts degree requirements — please check with your Faculty Advisor before starting a Minor.

Study Abroad Opportunities

S.U. Abroad - Many students take advantage of this time in college to experience another culture and country. Through S.U. Abroad, many of our students have studied for a semester in: London, Spain, Italy and Australia. Most International programs are not nutrition friendly, so studying abroad works best if we do a little advance planning regarding your sequence of courses. Students typically like to study abroad sometime during the junior year. Refer to the S.U. Abroad web page to learn more about the various semester and summer programs you could do.

Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteering is an important avenue for dietetic students to display civic responsibility, learn about the field, get practical experience, and build your resume. Volunteering can start with a simple informational interview or job shadowing. Many times a successful volunteer experience can turn into a paid position. Volunteer opportunities can be a one-time, one-day event or they can be a standard part of your weekly schedule. Although one-day experiences are appropriate, it is the long-term sustained experiences that are truly valued by students themselves, internship directors, and future employers. Start engaging in volunteer experiences early in your college career. Do not wait until your junior or senior year when it is too late and obvious on your resume/application. Volunteer experience may help you get into a supervised practice program after you graduate. It is recommended that you acquire at least 250 hours of nutrition-related volunteer experience through your college career from a variety of settings such as: clinical—inpatient or outpatient hospital settings and nursing homes (junior or senior year), community (soup kitchens, Shaw Programs, C.N.Y. Food Bank, Head Start, and W.I.C. are a few suggestions) and food service (S.U. Dining Services, school food service, restaurant or catering). If you can get paid for your experience - great! This is all based on the honor system and there is no signature required of you from the person you volunteer or work for to collect these hours. Do come up with a good system to track your hours you work or volunteer as it will be required of you to document this in your dietetic internship application in your senior year — it will be hard to remember all of this without it being written down. See form in the Appendix that you may use to track your hours. A good question to ask yourself when deciding if a work or volunteer experience is appropriate to do is "will I be doing this potentially as a dietetic intern?" If the answer is yes, then go ahead with it because dietetic internship directors are looking to see if you are familiar with the nutrition field (clinical, food services and community areas) when they review your application to their internship.

Job Shadowing

As part of the job shadowing experience, students are primarily there to observe and ask questions. The job shadowing opportunity should result in the student having been exposed to "real life" work in a career of interest. Students may practice hands-on tasks associated with the job, but may not perform productive work which benefits the employer.

To make the job shadowing experience successful, the student will

  • dress according to the standards of the particular site;
  • call the site before the scheduled time if unable to attend on the appointed day;
  • arrive at the site at the agreed upon time;
  • follow all guidelines and policies of the site;
  • complete all required paperwork (permission, medical authorizations, etc.).

The person you “shadow” is not required to sign any paperwork for you. You do not turn in any form that proves you completed the volunteer hours to our program. This is all done based on the honor system. You will however be asked to elaborate about your experience in an interview setting if it is listed in your portfolio, resume or Dietetic Internship application.

Benefits of Job Shadowing include

  • learning about the job and whether this is something you would enjoy and/or be capable of doing;
  • becoming familiar with the job setting;
  • making professional contacts for mentoring and possible employment.

Informational Interview

An informational interview can be conducted alone or as part of a job shadowing experience. It is never too early to start these interviews. I suggest students conduct at least 2-3 informational interviews per academic year, so that you meet a variety of professionals, start to see how the field works, potentially secure volunteer experiences, and build your network.

Here are two other excellent resources to help you prepare to secure and conduct effective informational interviews.

In general, consider asking about

  • Experiences and training required for position
  • Previous professional experiences
  • Opportunities for advancement
  • A typical day
  • Working conditions
  • Starting salary range and benefits 

Tracking Your Experiences

Track your volunteer, shadowing and informational interviews on your dietetics experience worksheet. (Please see the section Policy for D.P.D. Verification Form.) For each volunteer, shadowing, or interview experience, record a few notes on the form provided in the appendix of this handbook. Record such information as: Description and location of the experience, Name of person shadowed/interviewed/supervising you and contact information; date(s) of experience; hours spent at the facility; etc.; Make a note regarding what you learned and reactions to the experience. When it comes time to complete your Internship application, you will appreciate having this record of your four years of volunteer experiences.

Other Volunteer Opportunities

There are numerous avenues available through the department, university and community at large (hospitals, soup kitchens, food pantries, schools, etc.) for volunteering. In 1999, the students started a student dietetic association: Nutrition Education and Promotion Association (NEPA), which provides many avenues for one day or extended volunteer opportunities. Once you complete N.S.D. 511 (Nutrition Education), consider doing some peer nutrition education on campus and in the community through: Out Reach and Nutrition Group Education by Wellness Responsibility Advocating Peers (ORANGEWRAP). If you are creative, consider writing for the college student magazine - Healthy You @ S.U.. Numerous other opportunities are available through the year associated with the campus R.D.’s, National Nutrition Month, the Central New York Dietetic Association or other avenues.

Volunteer opportunities will be shared often via class announcements, campus email and in the department. When you volunteer at a facility, it is a requirement of our program that you must not be used to replace an employee and their responsibilities.

To best assist you with the securing appropriate volunteer experiences, N.S.D. students will register through The Shaw Center at the start of each academic year. We have established a process for nutrition students and have student nutrition volunteer coordinators working for The Shaw Center at 309 Women's Building. Be sure to pick up a nutrition volunteer packet — not the general student population packet. Once you are registered, you can secure opportunities available through the center and those announced through the N.S.D. program via the nutrition volunteer coordinator(s).

Nutrition students have acquired field experience through non-credit and credit-bearing internships. A few examples include: S.U. as a Peer Advisor, S.U. Dining Services, S.U. Health Center, soup kitchens and pantries, diabetes camps, weight loss centers, W.I.C., private consulting dietitians, and Wegmans. Some students have done the “paid” (and includes room and board) eight-week food service management internship through N.A.C.U.F.S. (Applications are due mid-January.)

Use your breaks at home wisely by doing the necessary research to help you land the best volunteer and work experiences for your summers at home. Acquire a variety of nutrition-related volunteer/work experience to help you explore the field and to build your resume.

Other Extracurricular Experiences

Research Experience with an S.U. faculty member

All faculty teach, conduct research and provide service in the community. Consider doing a research experience with a faculty member in the department. Many faculty provide easy opportunities through their classes for you to get a safe and simple exposure to research - but maybe you want more. If you are ever considering an honors thesis, graduate school or simply interested in the investigative processes, you can possibly volunteer or do an independent study for credit. Interview the various faculty to find out what they have going on and how you could get involved.

Annual Public Policy Workshop

The Annual Public Policy Workshop is the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics' premier policy and advocacy training.

Legislative Advocacy Day

Located in Albany early March or May. Work side by side with Nutrition professionals to influence New York state legislators.

Food and Nutrition Conference Expo (F.N.C.E.)

F.N.C.E. is the annual dietetic conference held in October. Location of national meeting changes each year. Last year it was held in Washington, D.C. This year it is in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and it is a great networking and learning opportunity. We will be bringing students to F.N.C.E. this year so be sure to register with Donna Sparkes.

Work Experience

Obtaining work experience can help you apply what you are learning in class, to investigate the field and to build your resume. Just as with volunteering, the opportunities are endless and really depend upon your motivation and perseverance. Part-time and summer position are available in hospitals and long term care facilities (dietary aid, food service worker, etc.), camps, restaurants, bakery, aerobics instructor, S.U. food service, community agencies, schools, day care, long term care facilities, home health care, etc.

Student Membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Students are encouraged to join the Academy as an Associate member at a cost of $58.00 per year for student membership.

A few benefits of the professional members of the Academy include: receive the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics monthly and the Academy. Courier quarterly, gain access to the Academy members’ only pages, automatic membership in your State Dietetic Association, attend annual F.N.C.E. conference at reduced rate, join dietetic practice groups, hold appointed positions at national and Affiliate levels as designated by the House of Delegates.

Membership in the Central New York Dietetic Association (C.N.Y.D.A.)

The C.N.Y.D.A. student membership rate is $10.00 per year, and offers opportunities for National Nutrition Month, networking with R.D.s, scholarships, etc.

Student Membership in the Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior (S.N.E.B.)

Individuals who are registered as full-time students or are actively working on a degree at an accredited college or university are eligible for student membership in S.N.E.B. All students must have their membership application signed by a faculty member to verify student status. Dues are $60.00 per year (prorated – depending upon when you join).

A few benefits of S.N.E.B. membership include: Networking opportunities; Leadership and professional development; mailed publications - Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior and S.N.E.B. Communicator; Reduced registration rates for annual meeting; Eligible for student scholarships and awards; Access to S.N.E.B.'s listserv; Information on nutrition policy issues relevant to the public's health and well-being; opportunity to participate in special interest divisions.

Portfolio

What is a portfolio?

A portfolio is a purposeful collection of student work that exhibits the student’s efforts, progress and achievement in one or more areas. It is a crucial part of the internship or job selection process. It may not only get you an interview, but it also may clinch an internship spot or job offer. It is important for you to have an effective way to show your work. A portfolio should demonstrate self-awareness, understanding of the field, creative ability, technical proficiency, and an abundance of ideas. It should be a systematic package of your visual solutions to real or practice assignments. The overall appearance and content of your portfolio leaves a lasting impression about your unique style, talent and expertise.

Why keep a portfolio?

  • It is a method for tracking your accomplishments. 
  • It is a marketing tool representing you. 
  • Depending upon the quality of your experiences and documentation, some supervised practice programs might give you clock hour credit.

The Best Portfolio

  • Is neat and carefully organized.
  • Includes samples of high quality. 
  • Does not include everything you have ever done. Choose only your very best work and select pieces that are relevant to the internship/employment selection committee. 
  • Demonstrates consistency in style and skill. 
  • Includes a sample of work in different stages to show your progression of ideas/learning 
  • Includes how you solved problems with alternate solutions to demonstrate creative versatility. 
  • Illustrates your skills and talents. 
  • Displays your accomplishments. 
  • Explains your resume. 
  • Markets who you are and what you have done. 
  • Is a communication tool during an interview. 
  • Helps you know and understand yourself better, to set goals and to be able to talk about who you are, what you’ve done and what you want to accomplish.

Developing Your Portfolio

  • On the volunteer/experience form in the Appendix, track your experiences/assignments that you might want to include in your portfolio. 
  • Start a holding box to secure these examples until you are ready to assemble it. 
  • Research the potential internship or employer. Slant your portfolio's contents to solutions developed with these customers in mind.
  • Review, assemble examples and develop a sequence for your work. Start with your strongest and most favorite work. 
  • Organize your portfolio to demonstrate how your skills will meet their needs and how they can profit from it. 
  • Choose pieces to represent your interests and philosophy. 
  • Decide on an orientation (portrait or landscape). Do not have pieces facing in different directions. 
  • Create an introduction and a list of contents. 
  • Evaluate. Get feedback from faculty/ career specialist on content & presentation.

What are you trying to convey through your portfolio?

Skills/attribute development and competence 
  • Self-knowledge 
  • Continual self-evaluation and learning 
  • Responsible, motivation, and hard-working 
  • Written and oral communication skills 
  • Emotional intelligence 
  • Leadership skills
  • Work alone or in a team 
  • Civic responsible 
  • Cross cultural competence 
  • Research skills 
  • Professional and ethical responsibilities
Engaged in...
  • Inter-professional learning and experiences 
  • Mentoring relationships 
  • Volunteer work 
  • Cross learning (applying what you learned in one class to another or to a volunteer experience) 
Outcomes 
  • Meeting ACEND Knowledge and Skills Competencies through class assignments, volunteer & work 
  • Accomplishments 

Content for your portfolio - a few ideas….

  • One page resume 
  • Followed by your philosophy 
  • A page or two from your N.S.D. 216 pre- or post-production report that illustrates what you were doing as manager
  • Print "handout" in 6 slides per page format of a PowerPoint presentation you created 
  • The printout of the webpage you designed 
  • A menu from a restaurant where you were a cook for one or more of the menu items 
  • Your advocacy letter from N.S.D. 455 
  • A flyer or brochure you designed to promote an activity for your organization 
  • Protocol page from a research project you assisted 
  • Photo w/caption of a display you created to educate the public on a nutrition or wellness issue 
  • A Cut out of an article you wrote for the Daily Orange or local newspaper 
  • Certificate of an award you won or membership in an honor society 
  • Letter of thanks for volunteering at food or nutrition-related community service organization 
  • A nutrition education piece designed in N.S.D. 511 
  • Photos of a research poster session you helped to author
  • Abstract from N.S.D. 457/654 research paper 
  • A copy of your client evaluation and or self-evaluation from N.S.D. 512
  • ServSafe certification
  • C.I.T.I training certificate

How should you create a professional portfolio - from Kimeldorf’s Portfolio Power

  1. Develop a collection of data for the portfolio’s content 
  2. Analyze the data critically and prioritize each portfolio element 
  3. Plot your career goals and career changes 
  4. Assemble your portfolio to target your goals 
  5. Check your final portfolio for details 
  6. Professional appearance 
  7. Have it reviewed by others 
  8. Practice incorporating it into an interview.

Portfolio Format

Most experts agree that the portfolio should have between 10 - 20 diverse pieces. All pieces should be of excellent quality, not a returned graded (marked) assignment. The most common portfolio is simulated leather, multi-ring with pages that allow inclusion of loose samples. This has the advantage of keeping your work in sequence and well protected. Avoid large, "student" size books; stick with 8 or 11x14". This portfolio will contain the start of a collection of things you have created.

Type a short explanation caption to attach to each item if it isn't self-explanatory.

  • Purpose
  • Self-evaluation
  • Skills aquired
  • Goals

More and more students are turning to technology to showcase their work on C.D., laptops or through the W.W.W. As access to the W.W.W. becomes commonplace and designers are developing solid Web design skills, creating a site that showcases your work is yet another option. As with any portfolio, only include work on your site that you would want an employer to see. It is wise to check to see what an employer's preference and capabilities are in terms of viewing an interactive version of your portfolio. Weebly or Wix are sample formats.

Showing Your Portfolio

Your initial contact may be with a resume, but after a potential internship director or employer sees it, they may want to see more of your work. Some firms have a drop off policy or set up appointments to see your work via a portfolio. Because things can get lost, it may be prudent to include only duplicates that can be replaced if you are not present for the review and show originals when you can be there. Label your portfolio with your name, address and phone number. When presenting your portfolio, allow your work to speak for itself. Be prepared to answer questions about your work. Your portfolio is probably the most important marketing piece you will create. Take the necessary time and effort to develop one that represents your creative talent, abilities and potential. You can view student portfolio samples in Nancy Rindfuss' office (554 White Hall).

Scholarships and Awards

Scholarships Offered through the Academy

The Academy offers scholarships to encourage eligible students to enter the field of dietetics. Students enrolled in their junior year in an ACEND-accredited or approved program, and who are student members of the Academy, may apply for scholarship money. Scholarships are also available for students in dietetic internships and graduate studies. Contact the Academy's website for further information. Awards range from $500-$10,000.

N.S.D. Awards

The Department of Nutrition Science and Dietetics annually gives out several awards (approximately 10) to our outstanding students. We would like you to participate in this process! Some awards require either a nomination or an application by interested students. Watch for the email sent by our department on the specific details and how to nominate someone or apply. The nominations or applications must be submitted to the department late January for consideration by the faculty. The awards are listed as follows:

Marjorie V. Dibble Scholarship Award

This award is given to a deserving student, and was established in 1977 in recognition of Professor Dibble’s 25th Anniversary with the College for Human Development.

Selleck Award

This award is given to a senior with exceptional personal qualities, significant service to the University and highest academic average for freshman, sophomore and junior years.

Victoria F. Thiele Scholarship Award

This award is given to a deserving student, and was established in 1981 in memory of Dr. Victoria F. Thiele and in recognition of her contributions to the College for Human Development.

Emily Gere Coon Award

This award is given to the sophomore with the highest academic average in nutrition in their freshman year, and was established in 1952 by Harold Coon in memory of his wife, a faculty member in the College for Human Development who was also a member of the first graduating class in 1922.

Susan J. Crockett Prize for Student Leadership

This award is given to a student who has shown outstanding leadership qualities during their academic career.

Vershann Icem-Wright Professional Promise in Nutrition Science and Dietetics Award

This award is given to a student who has a well-rounded record of contribution toward the field of nutrition and exhibited personal development as a future professional. Must be a junior or senior student in Nutrition. Resume, one-page written submission and recommendation are required.

Ruth Tolley Award – Women of the University Community

This award was established by the Women of the University Community in honor of Ruth Tolley, and is presented to a female senior student who has demonstrated outstanding academic achievement and career goals within the chosen field of Nutrition.

Peer Leader in Nutrition Science and Dietetics Award

This award is given in recognition of leadership. The recipient must be nominated by their peers. Undergraduate students in Nutrition are eligible.

Elizabeth L. Reid Memorial Award (Alternates departments/programs)

This award was established by the New York State Federation of Home Bureaus in honor of Elizabeth L. Reid and is presented to a student in Nutrition Science and Dietetics. The award is based on scholarship.

Faculty Award for Excellence in Nutrition Science

This award is given to a student who has demonstrated excellence in the field of Nutrition Science.

Nutrition Science and Dietetics Graduate Research Award

This award is given to a graduate student for outstanding accomplishments in research. Specific submission material is required.

Nutrition Science and Dietetics Research Award – Undergraduate

This award is given to an undergraduate student for outstanding accomplishments in research. Specific submission material is required.

Outstanding Graduate Assistant in Nutrition Science Award

This award is given to a graduate assistant who has provided exceptional service to the faculty.

Outstanding Graduate Student in Nutrition Science Award

This award is given to a graduate student for outstanding accomplishments in leadership, citizenship, work ethic and professional promise.

Florence B. Potter Memorial Award (Alternates department/programs)

This award was established by the New York State Federation of Home Bureaus and is based on scholarship. It is presented to an upperclassman who resides in Onondaga County and is entering their junior or senior year and has a G.P.A. of 2.85. However, entering sophomores may apply. There is an application to apply. Please see Donna Sparkes.

Victoria Li Scholarship Award

This award is given to a junior or senior Nutrition major, a pillar and leader, working with the community to improve an individual’s or groups’ nutrition knowledge and/or dietary intake. The award recipient exemplifies some of Tori’s best qualities: compassion (generous with time and energy), positivity and humility.

Other Falk College awards and scholarships and  University awards and scholarships are available, such as Who’s Who, Senior Class Marshall, Remembrance Scholarship, University Scholars, and Honor Societies.

National Certifications in Exercise

American College of Sports Medicine

Athletics and Fitness Association of America

American Council on Exercise

National Strength and Conditioning Association

Policies for the Dietetics (D.P.D.) Program 

University Rules and Regulations

The University Rules and Regulations also apply to all D.P.D. students.

Withdrawal and Tuition Refunds

Policies on Withdrawal and Tuition refunds can be found at the Bursar’s Office.

Student Discipline

Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities

Statement of Equal Opportunity

Non-Discrimination and Equal Opportunity Policy Statement

Health Fees and Health Insurance

Student Health Insurance

Professional Liability Insurance

When entering the junior year, students are encouraged to obtain insurance for professional liability for the duration of the program. The cost of this student insurance is $35 per year. One particular provider of this insurance is H.P.S.O.

Travel Liability and Expenses Policy

Student Travel Policy

Course Fees

A course fee may be charged in several departmental courses. This is used to cover the additional costs of the course such as guest speakers, videotapes and audiotapes, pamphlets and handouts, food and product costs for workshops, etc.

Student Rights Under The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

FERPA

Plagiarism and Academic Dishonesty

Academic Integrity Policy

Computer Use

Unauthorized use of a computer, computer trespass, computer tampering, unlawful duplication, and unlawful possession of computer related material can carry criminal sanctions and other liability. See General Academic Rules and Regulations.

Ethical and Professional Behavior

Dietetic students are expected to conduct themselves as professional persons. During class and volunteer experiences, you represent Syracuse University to the community. Students are expected to follow the Code of Ethics for Dietitians and to maintain high ethical standards. 

Cooperation/Communication Skills

Dietitians often work as members of a health care team or administrative team. Effective communication skills are necessary to the student's successful fulfillment of professional duties. Cooperation with classmates and faculty is vitally important.

Confidentiality of Client Information

Confidentiality of client records must be maintained at all times. Information concerning patients must never be discussed with anyone who is not directly related to the patient's care. Exchange of information should occur where the ordinary person would have an expectation of privacy.

Food Evaluation

Students are expected to participate in taste tests and sensory evaluation of food products and nutritional supplements. Refusal to do so will constitute inability to perform necessary dietetic functions and can constitute grounds for dismissal from the program. (Allowances will be made for documented medical problems such as allergies and for religious or ethical considerations.)

Alcohol and Drug Use

Alcohol and inappropriate drugs will not be tolerated according to campus policies.

Conduct during Lectures

Professional conduct including politeness and attention is expected during lectures. Guests should be treated with respect and thanked for their time. Especially in small group meetings, tactful questioning or comments and responsive eye contact may help the speaker to gear the talk to the needs of the students. In most cases, the only compensation the guests receive for their time is the satisfaction gained from working with students.

Incomplete

Illness or other exceptional circumstances are the usual basis for consideration for the grade of incomplete. To receive a grade of incomplete in a course, a student must complete the Request for an Incomplete Form available through the College.

Access to Personal Files

An individual may examine any records maintained on him/her by the Program. Students wishing to examine their records should notify the Program Director.

Protection of Privacy of Student Information

The law requires that the University maintain confidentiality of student records. Syracuse University accords all rights under the law to all current and former students. The policy outlining the University's compliance with the provision of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 is available for inspection by students.

Student Grievances

Individuals, when they are aggrieved, initiate action themselves, and supports are provided to encourage them to do so. Students may bring the matter to the attention of the Nutrition Undergraduate Program Director. Students may seek support from their advisors, or another empathetic faculty member. If satisfactory resolution of a grievance is not achieved, the student has the option of bringing the grievance to the Department level committee comprised of faculty and student representatives. The guidelines for make-up of the committee are available within the Department. Special procedures have been established by the University to cover academic dishonesty. The instructor can impose no academic penalties for suspected dishonesty without following the established procedures. A copy of the Student Grievance Processes are available from the College. A student may also submit complaints to ACEND only after all other options with the program and institution have been exhausted. The program will maintain a record of student complaints for a period of seven years.

Drug Testing

If a student volunteers at a facility that requires drug testing and criminal background checks, they must follow the procedure the facility has arranged. All costs associated with testing and background checks are the students’ responsibility.

Injuries or Illness

Student Health Insurance

Falk Student Services can guide you in the process of working with your faculty in the case of an extended illness.

Prior Learning Assessment / Competence

There is no policy to assess prior learning when volunteering in a facility.

Supervised Practice Programs: Dietetic Internships

The dietetic internship provides a minimum of 1200 hours of supervised practice. Internships follow completion of at least a bachelor's degree and ACEND coursework requirements. The program is usually completed in 6-24 months depending on the availability of a part-time schedule or requirement of graduate credit. An individual completing the program who is verified by the program director is eligible to apply for Active membership in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and/or to write the registration examination for dietitians.

Appointments to most dietetic internships are awarded on a competitive basis through a computer matching process. Refer to the appendix for a list of resources for success. Prospective applicants may contact program directors for current information, including application deadline dates. Programs will provide application forms and detailed information on program requirements, tuition, and financial aid upon request. A list of all Dietetic Internships can be found online. The website also contains the link to all the programs.

The Applicants Guide to Supervised Practice includes information on many ACEND-accredited dietetic internships. This is available in print for your use in the N.S.D. office.

What to consider when applying to supervised practice programs

  • Part time or full time
  • Length of the program
  • If grant a master’s degree, earn graduate credit or offer no graduate credit at all
  • Number of students accepted
  • Emphasis: general, clinical, community/public health, or food management
  • Location of country
  • Setting of program: Health care institution, community agency, University or College setting
  • Cost

Beginning the search process

Start your search by reviewing the handbook entitled “Applicant Guide to Supervised Practice Programs”. It is available for your use in the N.S.D. department. This handbook identifies the type of program, program focus, program cost/benefits, admission requirements, and applicant evaluation. There are about 250 programs so it helps to narrow down your choices by first considering location and cost.

Write or e-mail a number of different programs that interest you. If you are able, attend the open house or visitation sessions (typically scheduled Nov. through Jan.) made available by the supervised practice programs with which you are interested. Summer is an excellent time to get a jump-start on the internship research process and may allow you time to visit.

After reviewing the information, write down any questions you might have regarding the program. Follow-up with an email or telephone call to the director of the program. Plan to apply to several programs that interest you. There is an application fee. Students should apply to 7-10 programs due to the competitiveness.

Completing the application process

  • Pay attention to directions! There may be some D.I.s that request a paper application; most do not.
  • Refer to this site to access the D.I.C.A.S. (Dietetic Internship Centralized Application System) Application.
  • Make sure you complete each program’s requirements and application forms according to the directions (i.e. some programs require G.R.E.’s and you also have to apply to their graduate program).
  • If you do not meet the minimum qualifications, i.e. grade point average, your chances of being accepted are greatly diminished.
  • You will need three letters of recommendation. It is suggested that one be from your D.P.D. program director. Since most students apply at about the same time - ask your references early. Provide a resume and information about the programs you are applying to.
  • The “Intent to Complete” is initiated by you and completed by the D.P.D. Program Director.
  • Most supervised practice programs use a computerized matching system to select their class. You register with D & D Digital to complete this process. You rank order your preference for the programs to which you are applying. The cost for the computer matching process is ~$55.00. Be sure to follow the D & D Digital time line for the annual match dates. The deadline for the Spring match is typically February 15th of each year. There is a fee for each program you apply to in D.I.C.A.S. and a separate fee that is paid directly to the dietetic internship.
  • Remember, there are two opportunities to “match”, April and November. If you find the D.I. Program on the Academy website it will tell which match process they participate with. The most popular is spring.
  • Upon program completion, with the Falk College Recorder confirming your degree, a D.P.D. Verification is issued by the D.P.D. Director and mailed to you. This typically takes a few weeks after graduation. You should receive your Verification Statement by the end of July. You submit this to your D.I. director upon starting your program. You also will need to provide them with an official transcript that shows you were awarded a bachelor’s degree.

Interviewing

  • Once you have applied, your application is reviewed and:
  • If you meet the program’s requirements, an interview might be scheduled. If at all possible, visit the program in person. If this is not possible, ask if a telephone interview can be arranged.
  • The interview provides the program the opportunity to meet you and judge how well you would “fit” into the program. It also provides you with an opportunity to see if the program “fits” your needs.
    • You might want to consider the following while reviewing the various programs:
    • How flexible is the program?
    • With what type of learning environment do you best learn? Do you need structure or do you learn better independently?
    • What are your long-term goals? How will the program help you achieve them?
    • What percentage of the students have successfully taken the registration exam?
    • Does the program help you with career placement?
    • The number of positions and the geographic location (i.e. some of the most competitive will be in the major metropolitan areas such as Boston, New York, Atlanta, and Baltimore). Consider your chances of successfully matching with a program that accepts a limited number of students, and is located in a highly desirable metropolitan area.
  • If you are granted an interview, be prepared by:
    • Finding out if you are being interviewed by one person, a panel, or rotating through a series of interviews.
    • Ask how long the interview lasts
    • Are there sample questions to help you prepare?
    • Will you have the opportunity to tour the facility?
    • Will you have the opportunity to meet current students?
  • On the day of the interview:
    • Arrive early
    • Wear conservative professional attire.
    • Bring your portfolio.
  • The actual interview provides you with the opportunity to “sell” yourself.
    • Be clear as to why you want this particular program
    • Explain any low academic grades.
    • Describe work or volunteer experience and how the skills you learned will enhance your performance in the supervised practice.
    • Show your portfolio.
    • Some programs test the academic knowledge of the students before accepting the student.

Match Process

Find up-to-date information regarding the match policies and procedures at ACEND Dietetic Internship Match Students.

Past match rates:

2015: 86%; 2016: 68%; 2017:85%; 2018: 89%; 2019: 90% of S.U. D.P.D. students (undergraduate and graduate combined) matched with a dietetic internship. The national average is 61%.

Some resources you can find at the ACEND website include

  • F.A.Q.: Top 10 Questions about Computer Matching for Dietetic Internships (D.I.s)
  • Availability of Dietetic Internship Positions
  • Suggestions to Improve Your Chances at Getting a Dietetic-Internship Position
  • Computer Matching: Applicant Responsibilities
  • How to Apply for a Dietetic Internship
  • Computer Matching Timelines
  • Video for D.I.C.A.S.

Registration Exam

Once you have successfully completed a Dietetic Internship, you will be verified as eligible to take the Registration Exam for Dietitians. The exam is computerized. We highly encourage you to take your R.D. exam as soon after your Supervised Practice Program as you can, because the longer you wait, the likelihood of obtaining a lower or failing score increases. The overall pass rate in the country (2016) for first time test takers is 72%; The current 5-year average (2015-2019) R.D.N. pass rate for S.U. graduates taking the R.D. Exam for the first time= 90%.

The Registration Examination for Dietitians is designed to evaluate a dietitian's ability to perform at entry-level. The content domains and topics are based on R.D.N. practice audits. Keeping good notes during your four years that are well organized will be useful for studying for the exam. The senior exam will also give you an idea of what you are retaining from your four years.

Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Code of Ethics

Academy Code of Ethics

Resources regarding the field of dietetics and how to be successful

Available in the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Free online with your A.N.D. membership or through the S.U. library Medline database.

  1. Evidence-Based Practice: What Are Dietitians’ Perceptions, Attitudes, and Knowledge?, Laura D. Byham-Gray, Judith A. Gilbride, L. Beth Dixon, Frances King Sage J Am Diet Assoc October 2005;105 (10):1574-1581
  2. 2016 Academy Member Benefits Update, Jim Weinland, Lilliane Smothers, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 116, Issue 4, p563–566, Published in issue: April 2016
  3. Report on the American Dietetic Association/ADA Foundation/Commission on Dietetic Registration 2004 Dietetics Professionals Needs Assessment, Dick Rogers J Am Diet Assoc September 2005;105(9):1348-1355
  4. Predictors for Research Involvement among Registered Dietitians, Laura D. Byham-Gray, Judith A. Gilbride, L. Beth Dixon, Frances King Stage J Am Diet Assoc December 2006;106(12):2008-2015
  5. Academic Measures Available in Sophomore Year can Predict Application and Admission to Dietetic Supervised Practice Programs, Catherine English J Am Diet Assoc August 1995; 95(8):904-907
  6. Criteria that predict dietetics success: How to prepare students for coordinated undergraduate programs, Kim L Dittus, Kevin J Wise, Dorothy Pond-Smith J Am Diet Assoc February 1994;94(2)150
  7. Dietitian, Dietician, or Nutritionist? Wendy Marcason, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 115, Issue 3, p484, Published in issue: March 2015
  8. Leadership Development: Preparing Dietetics Professionals for Success, Susan H. Laramee, Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 114, Issue 5, S4, Published in issue: May 2014.

Professional Development Portfolio

The Continuing Education system once you are a Registered Dietitian. An R.D. is required to complete 75 continuing education units (C.E.U.s) every five years in order to maintain the R.D. credential.

State Professional Regulations

In the appendix, you will find the definitions for certification/licensure and what guides each state. Review the requirements in your state.

Professional Development and Advanced Certificates

Beyond Registered Dietitian, you might want to work toward other advanced credentials to enhance your career path. For advanced certificates in Dietetics start your research at the C.D.R. website.

Through other organizations, you can become a diabetes educator and nutrition support specialist.

Graduate School

If you are considering going on to graduate school in nutrition or some other field, start doing your research no later than your junior year. Here are some resources to get you started. You should plan to take the Graduate Record Exam (G.R.E.) early in your senior year. Applications are due during the fall/spring semester of your senior year. Talk to the various faculty in the department to get their advice on this process.

Career Services Network Graduate School Information

Advanced Degrees in Nutrition

Department of Nutrition Science and Dietetics Graduate Program

The American Society of Nutritional Sciences Graduate Programs

Appendix

Suggested D.P.D. Course Sequence by Year and Pre-Requisites

Freshmen

CoursePre-Requisite or Co-Requisite

N.S.D. 225 Nutrition in Health

 

N.S.D. 114 Food Safety/Quality Assurance

 

N.S.D. 115 Food Science I

 

H.S.H. 101 Freshmen Forum

 

C.H.E. 106 Chemistry I and Lab

C.H.E. 107

C.H.E. 116 Chemistry II and Lab

C.H.E. 106, C.H.E. 117

B.I.O. 121 General Biology and Lab

 

B.I.O. 123 General Biology II

 

B.I.O. 124 General Biology II Lab

B.I.O. 123

W.R.T. 105 Writing I

 

Sophomore

CoursePre-Requisite or Co-Requisite

N.S.D. 216 Food Service Operations

N.S.D. 115

N.S.D. 275 Food Service Systems

N.S.D. 216

N.S.D. 326 Practice of Dietetics

N.S.D. 225, N.S.D. 114

N.S.D. 342 Nutrition in the Lifespan

N.S.D. 225

B.I.O. 216 Anatomy and Physiology I and Lab

B.I.O. 121, 123 and 124

B.I.O. 217 Anatomy and Physiology II and Lab

B.I.O. 121, 123 and 124

M.A.T. 121 OR 221 Statistics

 

W.R.T. 205 Writing II

W.R.T. 105

Junior

CoursePre-Requisite or Co-Requisite

N.S.D. 312 Food Service Systems Management

N.S.D. 275

N.S.D. 455 Community Nutrition

 

N.S.D. 457 Research and Evaluation in Nutrition

 

N.S.D. 456 Nutritional BioChem

C.H.E. 106/116, B.I.O. 216/217

N.S.D. 466 Nutritional BioChem II

N.S.D. 225, N.S.D. 456, B.I.O. 216/217

N.S.D. 511 Nutrition Education

N.S.D. 225, N.S.D. 342

Senior

CoursePre-Requisite or Co-Requisite

N.S.D. 476 Senior Seminar

 

N.S.D. 477 Senior Seminar II

N.S.D. 476

N.S.D. 481/482 M.N.T. I and Lab

N.S.D. 225, B.I.O. 216/217

N.S.D. 483/484 M.N.T. II and Lab

N.S.D. 481

N.S.D. 512 Nutrition Counseling

N.S.D. 225, N.S.D. 511, N.S.D. 342

N.S.D. 555 Food, Culture and Environment OR

N.S.D. 452 Mediterranean Food and Culture

N.S.D. 115, N.S.D. 225

N.S.D. 225

D.P.D./Nutrition Undergraduate Course Sequence - Fall 2019

Freshmen

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 225 Nutrition in Health for Majors

3

H.S.H. 101 First Year Gateway

1

C.H.E. 106 Chemistry I

3

C.H.E. 107 Chemistry I Lab

1

B.I.O. 121 General Biology

4

W.R.T. 105 Writing I

3

Total credits

 15

Spring

coursecredits

N.S.D. 114 Food Safety and Quality Assurance

2

N.S.D. 115 Food Science I

3

C.H.E. 116 Chemistry II

3

C.H.E. 117 Chemistry II Lab

1

B.I.O. 123 General Biology II

3

B.I.O. 124 General Biology II Lab

1

Flexible course (1)

3

Total credits16

Sophomore

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 216 Food Service Operations

4

N.S.D. 326 Practice of Dietetics

3

B.I.O. 216 Anatomy and Physiology I + lab

4

Flexible course (2)

6

Total credits

17 

Spring

coursecredits

N.S.D. 275 Food Service Systems

3

N.S.D. 342 Nutrition in the Life Span

3

B.I.O. 217 Anatomy and Physiology II + lab

4

W.R.T. 205 Writing II

3

Electives

3

Total credits16

Junior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 312 Food Service Systems Management

3

N.S.D. 455 Community Nutrition

3

N.S.D. 456 Nutritional BioChem

4

N.S.D. 457 Research & Evaluation in Nutrition

3

Flexible course (1)

3

Total credits16

Spring

coursecredits

N.S.D. 452 Mediterranean Food & Culture *

(3)

N.S.D. 466 Nutritional BioChem II

3

N.S.D. 511 Nutrition Education

3

Flexible course (1-2)

6

Electives

4

Total credits16

Senior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 476 Senior Seminar

1

N.S.D. 481 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

3

N.S.D. 482 Medical Nutrition Therapy I Lab

1

N.S.D. 555 Food, Culture and Environment *

3

Flexible course (1-2)

3

Electives

3

Total credits14
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 477 Senior Seminar II

1

N.S.D. 483 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

3

N.S.D. 484 Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab

1

N.S.D. 512 Nutrition Counseling

3

Electives

3

Total credits14


Total Degree Credits to Equal 124

* N.S.D. 452 or other approved S.U.A. classes can count for required N.S.D. 555 Food Environment and Culture

Required Flexible Courses (22-24 credits)

coursecredits
Statistics (M.A.T. 121 or 221)4
Psychology (P.S.Y. 205)3
Social Science3

Communication Skills

(H.F.S 255, H.F.S. 325, C.R.S. 225, C.R.S. 325, C.R.S. 331, C.R.S. 333, C.R.S. 335, C.R.S. 430)

3
Humanities6-8

Writing Intensive - Combine with Social Science, Humanities or Elective requirement


Critical Reflections - Combine with Social Science, Humanities or Elective requirement


(Also refer to S.U. 2019-2020 Course Catalog)

62 credits of liberal arts required

D.P.D. Nutrition Undergraduate Fall Study Abroad Course Sequence – Option I

Freshman

Same as above

Sophomore

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 216 Food Service Operations

4
N.S.D. 326 Practice of Dietetics3
N.S.D. 342 Nutrition in the Life Span3
B.I.O. 216 Anatomy and Physiology I + lab4
Flexible course (1)3
Total credits17
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 275 Food Service Systems

3
N.S.D. 457 Research & Evaluation in Nutrition3
B.I.O. 217 Anatomy and Physiology II + lab4
W.R.T. 205 Writing II3
Electives3
Total credits16

Junior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 452 Mediterranean Food & Culture (Italy) *

3
Flexible course (2)6
Electives3
Total credits12
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 312 Food Service Systems Management

3
N.S.D. 511 Nutrition Education3
Flexible course (2)6

Electives

3
Total credits15

Senior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 455 Community Nutrition

3
N.S.D. 456 Nutritional BioChem4
N.S.D. 476 Senior Seminar1
N.S.D. 481 Medical Nutrition Therapy I3
N.S.D. 482 Medical Nutrition Therapy I Lab1
N.S.D. 555 Food, Culture and Environment *3

Flexible course (1)

3
Total credits18
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 466 Nutritional BioChem II

3
N.S.D. 477 Senior Seminar II1
N.S.D. 483 Medical Nutrition Therapy II3
N.S.D. 484 Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab1
N.S.D. 512 Nutrition Counseling3

Electives

4
Total credits15

* Complete N.S.D. 555 if a comparable Food and Culture class was not taken abroad

D.P.D. Nutrition Undergraduate Spring Study Abroad Course Sequence – Option II

Freshman

Same as above

Sophomore

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 216 Food Service Operations

4
N.S.D. 326 Practice of Dietetics3
N.S.D. 342 Nutrition in the Life Span3
B.I.O. 216 Anatomy and Physiology I + lab 4

Flexible course (1)

3
Total credits17
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 275 Food Service Systems

3
N.S.D. 457 Research & Evaluation in Nutrition3
B.I.O. 217 Anatomy and Physiology II + lab4
W.R.T. 205 Writing II3

Flexible course (1)

3
Total credits16

Junior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 312 Food Service Systems Management

3
N.S.D. 455 Community Nutrition3
N.S.D. 511 Nutrition Education3
Flexible course (1)3

Electives

5
Total credits17
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 452 Mediterranean Food & Culture (Italy) *

3
Flexible course (2)6
Electives3
Total credits12

Senior

Fall
coursecredits

N.S.D. 456 Nutritional BioChem

4
N.S.D. 476 Senior Seminar1
N.S.D. 481 Medical Nutrition Therapy I3
N.S.D. 482 Medical Nutrition Therapy I Lab1
N.S.D. 555 Food, Culture and Environment *3

Flexible course (1)

3
Total credits15
Spring
coursecredits

N.S.D. 466 Nutritional Bio Chem II

3
N.S.D. 477 Senior Seminar II1
N.S.D. 483 Medical Nutrition Therapy II3
N.S.D. 484 Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab1
N.S.D. 512 Nutrition Counseling3

Electives

5
Total credits16

* Complete N.S.D. 555 if a comparable Food and Culture class was not taken abroad.

Graduate Coursework Allowing for D.P.D. Verification at Syracuse University

Required Courses for Nutrition Science Master of Arts

Assumes 100% of the following five courses are complete:

D.P.D. Required Coursescredits

N.S.D. 114 Food Service and Quality Assurance

2

N.S.D. 115 Food Service I

3

N.S.D. 275 Food Service Systems

3

N.S.D. 314 Hospitality Human Resources Management

1

N.S.D. 216 Food Service Operations or Equivalent at Community College

4

Sub-Total

13

N.S.D. 511 Nutrition Education

3

N.S.D. 512 Nutrition Counseling

3

N.S.D. 555 Food, Culture and Environment

3

N.S.D. 627 Public Health Nutrition

3

N.S.D. 648 Dietetics Practice Across the Lifespan

3

N.S.D. 652 Mediterranean, Food and Culture: A Florence Experience (Abroad)

OR

N.S.D. 600 South Asia Food, Culture, Family and Healthcare Systems (Abroad)

(Either course may be substituted for N.S.D. 555 by petition)

 

(3)

N.S.D. 654 Nutrition Research Methods

3

N.S.D. 665 Metabolism of Micronutrients

3

N.S.D. 667 Metabolism of Macronutrients

4

N.S.D. 680 Seminar in Food and Nutrition

1

N.S.D. 681 Medical Nutrition Therapy I

3

N.S.D. 682 Medical Nutrition Therapy I Lab

1

N.S.D. 683 Medical Nutrition Therapy II

3

N.S.D. 684 Medical Nutrition Therapy II Lab

1

N.S.D. 695 Nutritional Status Evaluation

3

Sub-Total

37

Grand Total

50

Take at least 10 credit hours per semester.

If you wish to pursue the M.S. you must see Dr. Lynn Brann for advising.

Reviewed 7/2019

Policy for D.P.D. Verification Form - Undergraduate Students

PolicyDPDVerificationForm.pdf

Policy for D.P.D. Verification Form - Graduate Students

PolicyDPDVerificationFormGraduate.pdf

Nutrition Volunteer Hours Tracking Form

NutritionVolunteerHoursTrackingForm.pdf

Registration Examination for Dietitians Test Specifications – Effective January 2017

Registration Examination for Dietitians Test Specifications

  • Current specifications are in the right-hand column

The Registration Examination for Dietitians is designed to evaluate a dietitian’s ability to perform at the entry-level. The examination content domains and topics are outlined below.

Domain 1 - Principles of Dietetics

  1. Food Science and Nutrient Composition of Foods
  2. Nutrition and Supporting Sciences
  3. Education, Communication and Technology
  4. Research Applications

Domain 2 - Nutrition Care for Individuals and Groups

  1. Screening and Assessment
  2. Diagnosis
  3. Planning and Intervention
  4. Monitoring and Evaluation

Domain 3 - Management of Food and Nutrition Programs and Services

  1. Functions of Management
  2. Human Resources
  3. Financial Management
  4. Marketing and Public Relations
  5. Quality Management and Improvement

Domain 4 - Foodservice Systems

  1. Menu Development
  2. Procurement, Production, Distribution, and Service
  3. Sanitation and Safety
  4. Equipment and Facility Planning

Reviewed 7/2019


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