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Distributed on  Wednesday, January 30, 2019

Ticket out

I like to do a ticket out at the end of the first class.  I continue this practice throughout the semester.  As students leave, I have them either share the main idea of the class on a post-it note or have them list at least one question that they have about the topic on a post-it note.  They stick it to the door on the way out.

  •  I review these and connect with the students at the beginning of the next class. 
  •  My students love this.  Their feedback to me is that it makes them feel part of their own learning and engaged in the class.

Example questions

  •  The 1 thing that I learned is                                     
  •  I still have this one question                                    
  •  3 things that I did not know before                                

One-minute review

Let’s expand on the “ticket out” teaching technique. Now how do you re-connect with your students at the beginning of the next class? One of my favorites is the “One Minute Review”.  One Minute Review – did one question from the “ticket out” really stand out? If so, post that question to have them self-reflect. Then start the “one minute review” by having the students get in pairs or small groups to share with each other for one minute. You can then have volunteers to share out. Then summarize.

How does this work as a connecting activity

  • First step is to review the responses to the ticket out
  • Second step is to have the students “remember” what they said by doing the “one minute review”
  • Third step is for you to summarize both activities – great review process

This technique is also a way to recall prior knowledge and engage students. Example questions

  •  The 1 thing that I learned is                                     
  •  I still have this one question                                    
  •  3 things that I did not know before                                

Pair-share: 

Students quickly introduce themselves to the person next to them.  State what they already know about the subject and/or what they hope to learn.  You can expand this to align with your topic or concept.

Think-pair-share

After reviewing or lecturing on the topic, present a prompt to the students:

  •  Explain the main idea behind                                  
  •  How does what I just talked about (or demonstrated) compare with                                  
  •  Summarize in your own words