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Udated 08/07

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Cataloguing policy (books and other print materials, draft as of 5my16)

Background: When SCRC cataloguers were brought under the umbrella of the Catalogue Department (2005), stated goals were both to bring the underlying framework into line with general cataloguing conventions, and, more importantly, to document the details of SCRC practice (prior to that it was purely oral tradition). The “Checklist for SCRC Cataloging” was developed to guide the cataloguers’ work and to remove some decision-making from the Library technician cataloguers.

1. SCRC cataloguing policies and procedures rest on a range of national standards (RDA, AACR-2, CONSER, DCRM, etc.) and are developed in the context of SUL’s overall cataloguing policy as set by the Acquisitions and Cataloguing Department. Within this framework, procedures are created to meet SCRC needs for detailed description and enhanced access to support service needs of the collections. In addition, items are generally identified at the printing rather than the edition level; however, these records are not added to OCLC.

2. Cataloguing priorities are set by the Managers’ Group at the start of a calendar year. Curators, cataloguers, the head of public services, and the lead archivist meet to discuss, review and evaluate collections as to the range of materials included to aid in creating the cataloguing framework which identifies access and levels of description. The framework is documented on the cataloguing WIKI and may be revised once the project in underway. This framework identifies gift and provenance notes, linking notes to manuscript and other collections, item needs in terms physical description (binding, state, imperfections).

3. New donations and materials flagged for cataloging identified during the processing of manuscript collections are not to be sent directly to cataloguing. These items should be added to the SCRC cataloguing backlog with a “Checklist for SCRC Cataloging” form completed and inserted into each piece. Only new purchases and agreed upon cataloguing priorities should be routed to cataloguing. Occasional rush and priority items may be inserted into the queue when necessary as well as “small” one-time gifts (usually 10 or fewer items).

4. Full-level cataloguing standards are used, unless curators request that Descriptive Cataloguing of Rare Materials (DCRM) standards be used, or, materials demand those standards in the judgment of cataloguing staff. Early upstate New York print materials and items published before 1700 generally receive DCRM treatment, with signature statements mandatory for items printed before 1600.

5. Subject access may be enhanced to highlight subjects of local interest and link an item to SCRC collections. Genre headings are added when deemed necessary by project guidelines or requested on “Checklist.” They are not removed from records containing them. Music subject analysis will be coordinated with the music specialists to bring score subject access into line with standards developed for Belfer sound recordings.

6. Unique item identifiers such as ownership and other inscriptions, stamps, bookplates, binding and bookseller tags, etc.) are generally noted.

7. OCLC records are used, when possible, with minimal changes. The range of pre-AACR2 records, as well as AACR2, RDA, RDA hybrid, DCRB (Descriptive Cataloguing of Rare Books), and DCRM records may be used with as is, with one exception. The physical description (MARC field 300) should be evaluated for clarity and completeness to insure that pagination and illustrative matter is adequately shown. Unless incorrect, information is not removed from records.

8. SCRC classifies all print materials using Library of Congress (LC) call numbers. Classification follows current standard call number practices to the extent possible; split collections will occur when call numbers change for subjects or literary authors. In 2014, SCRC managers and cataloguers agreed to abandon a number of locally-developed LC schemes used in the past to group items together and to rely on catalogue searches to collocate materials rather than physical location. Exception: exact copies will be added to the existing local call numbers. Local schemes such as that used for Browder, or, for the New York printing collection, will not be created in the future.

9. New titles are added to the general LC collection, unless donor or other considerations merit a separate, named collection.  The collection is divided among octavo (up to 28 cm), folio (29-49 cm), and flat folio (50 cm and up).  Maps, broadsides, posters, and other single-sheet items are house in the map cases; in addition, items consisting of only a few leaves, or especially fragile, may be housed in the cases for better protection.

10. New materials are not added to the Dewey collection; related or duplicate items currently in Dewey are reclassified to LC at the time the new item is catalogued.  The New York State collection is also frozen, except for adding exact duplicates. However, both collections will remain separate for the foreseeable future.

11. Exact duplicates will share a single bibliographic record, with local notes tied to the specific copies, and separate holdings records for each copy; previously, all copies had their own bibliographic record.  Any differences (printing, paperbound/hard bound, presence/absence of publishers' advertisements or illustrations) require 2 bibliographic records in order to fully describe each copy.

12. Serials will be catalogued as such and enhanced as necessary to meet access needs. Additional access points and enhancements may be made when new issues are added. Cataloguers will create, or enhance records to full CONSER level on OCLC. EXCEPTIONS: serial issues acquired because of a single article will follow standards for component parts for article(s) of interest. Component parts must comprise at least a page, preferably more; smaller articles, notices, and other references of interest will be highlighted in the serial record, and if appropriate, access points provided. Theme issues will generally be catalogued as monographs to provide access to issue content.

13. Access to names will be enhanced by creating access points for contributors to and editors of serials and other materials when appropriate. Publisher, printer, illustrator entries are added when merited, especially for older items. Generally all names in the statement of responsibility will receive access points: authors of introductions and afterwards, illustrators, translators, etc.

14. Contents of serials, anthologies, and multi-volume sets will be highlighted when necessary to bring out and provide access to content of local interest and appropriate access points added.

Procedures

New receipts: Cataloguing and processing

New receipts include purchased titles, gift titles (including those given that cited or used SCRC collections), print items removed from manuscript collections, and current periodicals and serials received and sent to SCRC by Acquisitions and Cataloguing serials staff.

  • All new receipts (except those from serials) must be accompanied by a completed Curator slip which indicates:
    • Fund used for new purchases
    • Donor and/or collection for gifts and items from Manuscripts; these items are sent for curatorial review prior to coming to the cataloguers.
    • Collections cited or used in research for publication.
    • Level of cataloguing desired (DCRM or not)
    • Additional name, subject, or genre access points
    • Special features to be noted
    • Relationships to SCRC collections
  • Cataloguers
    • Determine if item might be a candidate for manuscripts: is it primarily handwritten, a clipping or other ephemeral material?
    • Verify correct form of fund and donor notes (see below under local notes for this)
    • Examine item for additional provenance and physical characteristics, such as damage, binding, presence of dust jacket, or other details
    • Insure that finished record reflects everything from Curator slip.
    • Insure that correct author number is used for works of literature.
    • Inform conservation of special needs.
  • Current periodicals
    • Search title (as journal title search) and retrieve SP record.
    • Count as 1 paid piece added
    • Processing instructions are on the holdings record
      • Most titles are temporarily housed in Princeton files, or other containers and gathered at regular intervals by cataloguers and sent to Conservation for boxing, along with book flag and barcode.
      • Item records generally not assigned to individual issues.
      • Add issue to holdings, write call number on cover (or on page following), insert a slip with instructions for Conservation, generally along the lines of "plate only, no item record, do not place in envelope"
      • Place issue on truck with other items for Conservation.
      • When adding the last issue of a volume, collapse the issues into a volume statement.
      • If it is time to have issues boxed, pull the issues, and prepare them for Conservation; create item record for volumes contained in the box.
  • Book serials
    • Volumes are either adds to the holdings record, or, catalogued as monographs with a series statement. Instructions may be found on transmittal slip from serials receiving.
      • Added volumes:
        • Count as added paid piece.
        • Add volume to holdings.
        • Create item record.
        • Prepare a flag
        • Place books on truck for Conservation.
      • Volumes catalogued as monographs
        • Search OCLC for usable record.
        • Insure series statement is correct, using control headings to verify.
        • Create item record, flag, and place on truck for Conservation.
        • Count as new paid title catalogued.

 

 

 


General collections policies apply unless otherwise stated in this document.

Procedures and general cataloguing guidelines

The Basics

Select the most complete OCLC bibliographic record for the item in hand. When possible choose DLC or PCC member records. Use DCRB or DCRMB record if found and curator has requested that level of cataloguing.


Always use the “validate heading” feature in Connexion to check name and subject headings authority records. Search online authority file to determine if authorized form exists and correct headings as needed. If no authority records exists, use the form in the record.


If there are both monograph and serial records for a title, check the series in the authority file. Also check SUMMIT for past treatment of the series. Finally, check with one of the catalogue librarians for guidance if necessary.


For new purchased titles: Search SUMMIT to see if there is an order record. If found, verify that owning library is SP (if it is SU, ask one of the librarians to change it in order that the record can be overlaid.


Multiple copies: Formerly every copy had its own bibliographic record; currently exact copies will be represented by one bibliographic record with separate holdings records for each copy.

  • Use 590-notes to describe unique copy physical, provenance, or other aspects. Eg. Copy 1 gift of George Arents. Copy 2 imperfect: last 10 pages of text wanting.
  • Different printings or states will have their own SUMMIT bibliographic records, usually derived from the same master record on OCLC.
  • Items with duplicates in named collections may be left on their own bibliography record, especially if that record has access points not generally used.

Call number guidelines

General:

  • All current receipts are classified in Library of Congress; collection is divided according to size:
    • 0-28 cm. in regular stacks
    • 29-49 cm. in Folio (have single lower case f following call number
      • Skip one space in bibliographic and holdings record
      • Use separate line, centered, on book flag.
    • 50 cm. and up in Flat Folio (have double lower case f following call number)
      • Skip one space in bibliogrpahic and holdings record.
      • Use separate line, centered, on book flag.
  • Dewey: small Dewey sequence remains, with stated goal of ultimately reclassifying all to LC
    • Do not add new titles here
    • If adding a second copy, reclassify existing Dewey to LC as part of the process.
  • Titles have the same call number when:
    • They are different editions or printings of the same work.
    • They are title variants in a sequence of serial title changes. (See the serials procedures for additional details)
    • The classification schedules—mainly literature, but other areas as well—call for sub-organization by dates.
  • Unique titles require unique call numbers; where first title word is the same (or in other cases the author), Cutter numbers must be altered slighted to achieve this.
  • Work-letters distinguish printings (and sometimes editions) but, not titles.
  • Anthologies: When cataloguing those issued in a series and each number is treated as an individual monograph, assign a unique Cutter numbers are needed for each numbered piece.
  • Literary author numbers : 3 sources are used; goal is to be in sync with LC and not create a local conflict with an author number in use by LC.
    • In name authority record for author of fiction (field 053).
    • In 2nd $a of 050 when LC uses a PZ number as their preferred call number. Call number fields must be 050 and have a 2nd indicator of 0 (indicating LC)
    • Searching for author numbers in LC catalog: SU goal is to fit our call number into their sequence and not use a number already in use for another author. Occasionally LC is using a number for an author in their catalogue which doesn’t appear in other sources (the AF record, or the 050).
  • Children's literature:
    • Use PZ classification sparingly, mainly for anthologies, etc.
    • Use literary author numbers when these have been established for an author (see 053 in name authority records).
    • Use literary author numbers for authors with established author numbers in SCRC collections.
    • Create local literary author number for works of fiction by authors lacking them; add number to name authority record.
    • Use subject-based call numbers for non-fiction works by authors not falling into categories above.
  • Translations:
    • Cutter for the title in the original language.
    • .x Original work
      • .x117 Arabic translation
      • .x12 Polyglot
      • .x122 Catalan translation
      • .x125 Chinese translation
      • .x126 Czech translation
      • .x127 Danish translation
      • .x128 Dutch translation
      • .x13 English translation
      • .x134 Estonian translation
      • .x14 French translation
      • .x15 German translation
      • .x152 Greek translation
      • .x153 Gujarati translation
      • .x154 Hebrew translation
      • .x156 Hungarian translation
      • .x16 Italian translation
      • .x163 Japanese translation
      • .x164 Korean translation
      • .x1645 Lithuanian translation
      • .x165 Norwegian translation
      • .x167 Persian translation
      • .x168 Polish translation
      • .x169 Portuguese translation
      • .x1695 Romanian translation
      • .x17 Russian translation
      • .x18 Spanish translation
      • .x188 Turkish translation
  • Classification practice

Prior to June 2014, a number of call number anomolies were policy; these had the goal of using classification to create sub-collections based on collecting strengths, donors, and other local considerations. Often, 2 copies of the same item would be classified differently, one to support the local, and one in the expected call number. When discussions revealed that these practices were no longer serving either service or retrieval needs, the Managers' Group decided to end them. In most cases, standard LC or member library assigned call numbers will be used. However, second copies will be added to the local call number, but all new versions will be classified according to standard LC practice.

A brief survey of former local practice follows:

  • US cartoonists: NC1429
  • Albert Schweitzer: everything by under CT1098.S41 … / everything about under CT1098.S411
  • M. Bourke-White: TR650.B77 …
  • PanAm 103: everything under LD5237.7 1988 [Cutter for main entry] [date]
  • Peace (pamphlets, sermons, lectures, moral and ethical aspects): use JX1963 (discontinued by LC)
  • Joyce Carol Oates:
  • B. Spock: RJ61.S64
  • Fine Press items—use Z239 + Cutter for press + year + workmark for title.(discontinued by LC)
  • Literary authors—use author number for all works, regardless of subject matter.
  • Illustrators: lass in NC975 using designated sub-system for person.

Monographs

General policies

  • Most materials receive full level standard cataloguing; the use of DCRM (Descriptive cataloguing of rare materials) depends both on curator preference and the judgment of the cataloguers. When using DCRM, AACR2 conventions are followed throughout the record.
  • The transition to RDA (Resource Description and Access) began in fall 2013 for both monographs and serials, with all new workforms being created in RDA (unless one is creating a DCRM workform).
  • Editing OCLC records for local use
    • Accept full-level AACR2 records without further editing.
    • Accept full-level RDA or hybrid RDA records without further editing.
    • All records reflecting pre-AACR2 or mixed descriptive conventions will be standardized, generally to a hybrid record:
      • Use Desc a in the fixed field.
      • Follow AACR2 for the 245 and 260 fields.
      • Follow RDA conventions for field 300
      • Add the appropriate 3xx fields.
      • Add relators if easily determined.
  • Monographs are generally catalogued to the printing level; variant printings are generally retained.
  • Curators decide whether or not to add true second copies.
  • Serial volumes are catalogued as serials, unless they have a distinctive or theme title which allows for monographic treatment if the issues theme reflects the primary reason for the item's being added to SCRC
  • If only an article within a serial is of interest, that item is catalogued as an "In analytic"

FOR Non-DCRB SCRC cataloging

  1. Select the best record from among competing records (DLC preferred)
    1. Usually the one with the most holdings is the best choice (however, make sure record matches what's in hand to the edition level)
    2. For NYS and other items designated by curator as needing extra attention, a dcrb or dcrm record may be preferable. These may be found as separate master records, or information from institution records may be copied and pasted into master records for local use.
  2. Review the record, correct any obvious errors in spelling or format, bringing record up to AACR-2 standards. Assume record is more correct than not, unless evidence to contrary. Full-level (blank or I) DLC records (or those with pcc in 042 field) and Desc a (indicating AACR2) should require no changes to existing data.
  3. Always add date to the call number (090 or 050). Use workletters (b- ) to distinguish versions of the same printing published in the same year. When present, use printing dates in call numbers.
  4. Add title variations if necessary for access.
    1. Use 246 with appropriate tagging for alternative variants on piece.
    2. Use 246 3, 2nd indicator blank for access to alternative entries for titles containing numbers or symbols.
    3. Use 740, 2nd indicator 2, for analytic entries (access to sections within a work)
  5. Always add edition statement (MARC field 250) if present on piece, but not included in record. For English-language works,any statement that indicates an edition is added as such. Include names associated with that edition:
    1. 2nd ed., rev. and enl. / ‡b by W.H. Chalmer
  6. Publication statement (MARC field 260)
    1. Make sure US place is named in subfield a if foreign city is listed first on publication (we do not need to list foreign cities when the follow US place; do not remove if found in OCLC record)
    2. Record copyright dates if present in book and not in OCLC record; adjust fixed field date type and dates as necessary.
  7. Physical description (do not change if essentially correct)
    1. Always add leaves or pages of plates to subfield a (removing plates from subfield b)
    2. Generic ill. suffices for the vast majority; indicate col. when appropriate; facsims., maps and ports. are among the more common specifics brought out.
    3. For older items, verify size.
  8. Add access points (500, 590, 6XX, 7XX) as indicated by the curator form.
    1. 500 notes may be needed for illustrators and other names not mentioned in subfield c of 245 and designated as important by curators.
    2. 590 notes needed for gifts, linking notes to collections, or other special aspects of copy (See below for details on 5xx notes)
    3. Add genre subjects headings (655) only if requested by curators or instructions for a specific collection's processing; leave in 655 already in OCLC records if they are relevant.
    4. Non-fiction works must have at least one LC subject heading; add additional subject headings (600,610,611,630,650) requested by curator
    5. Add name entries (700,710,711) and appropriate relator terms when applicatble.
    6. Add additional title entries (730 for uniform titles--serials mainly--and 740)
  9. 856 fields may appear in records; delete any deemed "unimportant" or that no longer work (also delete the 007 if present.
    1. Current titles--such as Oates materials--contain links to publisher, author, tables of contents, or sample texts from the item being catalogued. Because LC currently hosts much of this datam it is left in the bibliographic record with the appropriate sub-field z as the first element. Information must be copied and added to an 856 in the MARC holdings record.
      1. 856 41 ‡z Electronic version: Sample text only:‡u http://www.loc.gov/catdir/samples/hm051/2003056793.html
      2. 856 42 ‡z Related electronic resource: Publisher description ‡u http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hm041/2003056793.html
    2. Table of contents information may be copied into a 505 in addition to providing the link. This allows for keyword searching on terms found here. Delete the 856 from the record.
    3. Links to electronic versions of the work being catalogued:
      1. General policy is not be make a link from the paper record to the electronic version.
      2. However, extenuating circumstances such as the fragility of the paper or a request from a curator allow such links to be made. Follow the example above for an electronic version.

Variant printings: policies and procedures

  1. Edit OCLC records to reflect printings, if other than the first:
    1. Some background: SCRC attempts to distinguish all bibliographic variants of a title. OCLC, in theory, distinguishes only true editions. OCLC records for a particular edition must be edited for different states or later printings of that edition.
      1. Procedures: If using the OCLC record for the first printing of an edition, edit dates as follows:
        1. Fixed field dates: Do not change (remains DtSt s with date of first printing)
        2. 260: leave date in $c as is and add the printing date in $g: … $c 1994 $g (Sept. 1997 printing)
        3. Call number: use printing date in the call number. Use a workletter to distinguish different printings from the same year, e.g. 1976b ; 1976c ; etc. (do not use work letter a unless you are cataloguing a facsimile)
        4. Use a 500 note for a numbered printing that lacks a date.
        5. Also use a 500 note, with source of information, for printing statements expressed as numbers of copies, e.g., 12,000-15,000th: 12,000-15,000th (title page verso)
    2. Policy issues:
      1. SCRC retains all variant printings.
        1. True duplicates (exact match to printing/state level) are discovered, decision has been made to withdraw them for both Science fiction and Grove projects. For New York State printing collection, keep everything. For other collections, consult with curators.
        2. Each printing has its own SUMMIT record, even if derived from the same OCLC master record. True duplicates may have their own SUMMIT records (this depends on the extent of the uniqueness of each copy as well as location or collection considerations) or they may be added on different holdings records attached to the same bibliographic record.
    3. Some useful definitions from AACR2:
      1. Edition: All copies produced from essentially the same type image (whether by direct contact or by photographic or other methods) and issued by the same entity.
      2. Impression: All copies of an edition of a book, pamphlet, etc., printed at one time (what we commonly call a “printing”)
      3. Issue: Copies of an edition forming a distinct group that are distinguished from other copies of that edition by minor but well-defined variations (e.g., a new impression of a book for which minor revisions have been incorporated into the original type image).
      4. Reprint: 1. A new printing of an item made from the original type image, commonly by photographic methods. The reprint may reproduce the original exactly or it may contain minor but well-defined variations 2. A new edition with substantially unchanged text.
    4. See MARC field help on OCLC for DtST and for field 260 for additional examples.

Prepublication versions of a work: Author's proof copy; Corrected proof copy; etc.

These are preliminary versions of a published work and as such as of interest because they illustrate the progress of a work from creation to publication. They may be issued without preliminaries, indices, formal title page and other publication information. They may include publisher publicity, promotion plans, etc.

Procedures:

  • Use the OCLC record for the published version; do not create a master record on OCLC.
  • Create a separate record on SUMMIT.
  • Compare the item to the bibliographic record; generally leave the record as is, but remove notes not relevant to the proof.
  • Create one or more 590-notes to describe the proof copy, highlighting
    • the nature of the proof copy being catalogued: generally quote what the item calls itself on the cover, but omit text along the lines of do not quote, etc.
      • "Advance paperbound proofs"(omit phrases such as not for distribution, etc.)
      • "This is an uncorrected proof" (Could shorten to "Uncorrected proof"
    • Binding and other physical details
      • Bound in printed wrappers.
      • Bound in illustrated wrappers.
      • Variations in size when compared to original

Example: Proof copy. Issued in red wrappers backed in black cloth; printed in black. 148 pages. 31 x 16 cm. Manuscript annotations.

  • Other features
    • Annotations, autographs, etc. (especially important if they are by the author--we have many such versions for JC Oates)
    • Generally omit other publisher information such as contacts, publisher representatives, publicity plans, etc.
    • Mention any letters to reviewers or readers that are laid or tipped in.
  • Call number: Do not consider these second copies, but use a work letter after the date to distinguish item from the published version.

Duplicates: how many records?

Generally use one bibliographic record for exact duplicates even when there are unique aspects to the copies in terms of funds, provenance, and other copy-specific details. Use c.1, c.2, etc. in holding record call numbers. If copy-specific details are especially complicated, or, multiple bibliographic records already exist, generally prefer separate records.

5XX Notes

General order of notes:

  • System details (538)
  • Nature or form (500)
  • Language and script (546)
  • Source of title proper (500)
  • General (participant or performer) (511 0)
  • Cast (511 1)
  • Credits (not cast) (508)
  • Other statements of responsibility (500)
  • Edition and history (500)
  • Publication, distribution, etc. (500)
  • Physical description (500)
  • Accompanying material (500)
  • Series (500)
  • Dissertations (502)
  • Target audeince (521)
  • Other formats available (530)
  • Summary, etc. (520
  • Contents (505)
    • Local practice for both general and special collections calls for adding a table of content note if it would add SIGNIFICANTLY to the quality of the record.
      • When chapters/sections contain words that would be helpful when searching that don’t exist elsewhere in the record.
      • When chapters have separate authors that might need to be searchable.
      • Always required for musical sound recordings.
  • Numbers (other than ISSN/ISBN, for which 020/022 creates a note as last note in record.
  • Citation notes (510)
    • Curators may cite or provide resources that may be used to provide information or direct descriptive elements such as:
      • Descriptive bibliographies can be cited for references. If a descriptive bibliography is being cited, use Standard Citation Forms for Rare Book Cataloging, available in Cataloger's Desktop.
      • For 19th-century and earlier materials, check both institutional records and additional master records for additional 510-fields and include them in our local record.
        • Examples:
          • Mickenberg (for radical children's literature):
          • 510 4 Tales for little rebels : a collection of radical children's literature / edited by Julia L. Mickenberg ... . 2008. $c p. nnn. (page number will appear on curator's checklist)
  • Local or copy-specific notes (590)
    • Curators will indicate notes required for each title.
    • Older SCRC records may contain holdings information for serials and multi-volume sets; when found, remove the note and add the holdings to the MARC holdings record.

Additional examples of local notes:

Donor information or fund information

  • Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art, 2009/10.
  • Gift of Norman Keim, 2011

(Dates may be left out if unknown)


When item has hand-written names, create a 590 note: The following are intended as samples; many forms have been used over the years. Select the pattern that best fits the situation you have.

  • Provenance: [name] (name in ms. on t.p.)
  • Signed by Authur Miller on title page. (Used for copies signed by author)
  • Signed: Joyce Carol Oates, author’s copy
  • Provenance: [name] (autograph)
  • Presence and extent of annotations.
    • Autograph:
    • Inscriptions:
      • Authors' presentation inscription: [followed by transcription of inscription; use elipses for overly long ones, or use pattern: Author's presentation inscription from Joyce Carol Oates to Syracuse University Library]
      • Presentation inscription: (for presentations of an item by individuals other than authors) [followed by transcription of inscription; use elipses for overly long ones, or use pattern: Presentation inscription from Mom to Mary Elizabeth Alden]
      • Inscription: [for all other types of inscriptions]

 

When item is one of a numbered edition, create two notes:

  • 500 Published in an edition of nnn numbers.
  • 590 Library has no. 10.
  • 500 Published in an edition of nnn lettered copies.
  • 590 Library has letter U.


When item is numbered and signed the notes should not be combined:

  • 500 Published in an edition of nnn numbers, signed by the illustrator.
  • 590 Library has no. 23.


Note when a book has illustrated wrappers or is in its original dust jacket.

500 Dust jacket. 500 As issued in illustrated wrappers (wrappers contain printed information and/or illustrations) 500 As issued in printed wrappers (wrappers contain printed information only)

Uncut and untrimmed items

  • When pages are uncut (meaning some pages are not viewable because they are within a fold), use 590 note:
    • Library's copy uncut.
  • When pages vary in size and book lacks a smooth edge, the copy is untrimmed; use 590 note:
    • Library's copy untrimmed.
  • When both situations are present, use one 590 note:
    • Library's copy uncut and untrimmed.

 

 


Note such other copy-specific features in 590-notes (include copy numbers when needed):

  • Imperfections
    • Library's copy imperfect: p. 122-155 lacking.
    • Library's copy imperfect: covers lacking; torn or missing pages (use when damaged or missing pages are spread throughout an item)
  • Non-SU bookplates or other prior ownership markings, such as ink or emossed stamps, paper labels, etc.
    • Helen and Lloyd Dorsey (bookplate)
    • Sir John Guilgood (armorial bookplate)
    • American Institute (embossed stamp)
    • Dorsey Books ... Boston (bookseller's label)
  • Annotations, underlinings, etc.
    • Library's copy 2 heavily annotated and underlined in unknown hand.
  • Binding information when requested by the Curator’s cataloging checklist.


Accompanying materials: these may be either inserted into or pasted in an item, or, in cases of multiple or sizeable mateirals, kept in an accompanying materials envelope.

  • Loose items are laid in
    • Bookseller's description laid in Library's copy
    • Laid in Library's copy: publisher's review slip and review from New York Times book review.
    • Business card from George Arents laid in Library's unnumbered copy 1.
  • Attached items:
    • Autograph letter signed by John Mayfield tipped in Library's copy
    • Typed letter from publisher affixed inside front cover.
  • Accompanying materials housed separately
    • Bookseller's catalogue and 5 letters between seller and John Mayfield in accompanying envelope.
    • Three reviews and response from Joyce Carol Oates in accompanying envelope.
    • Procedures:
      • Create item record for the envelope; count items and include as piece count in item record
      • Create flag for the envelope, with call no. suffix Acc.Mat. or Acc. Material
      • Add 2 866-fields to MARC holdings record:
        • [text]
        • Accompanying material

Linking to SU collections Curators will indicate when a title is related to a collection or is author of import to SCRC; include information in 590-notes.

  • The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript Collection of Arna W. Bontemps.

Research gift copies (use two 590-notes; no other acknowledgement needed)

  • Includes research material from the ... Papers at the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries.
  • Details concerning SCRC materials used (provided by the curator) and generally indicating pages with images and nature of materials used.
    • Eg., Images on pages 20-22, 53, 102; quotations

 Fund, gift, and citation notes (examples and templates for notes)

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note

Purchased from Charles A. Dana Foundation funds

Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art.

Purchased from funds from Library Associates

Purchased from George Arents fund

Purchased from Marie Little Bird Fund

Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund

Purchased from Sol Feinstone Library Fund.

Purchased from Alonzo Flack Library Endowment Fund

Purchased from Petty Fund

Purchased from Phi Beta Kappa Endowment Fund.

Purchased from Edward A. Smith and Sheridan Gilmore Smith Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from William P. Tolley Endowed Library Fund.

Purchased from Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from Eric W. Lawson Family Endowment for New York State Documentary Heritage

Purchased from Special Collections Research Center Gift Fund.

Purchased from Elizabeth Henes Endowed Fund.

Gift of Marc S. Seigle in memory of Vincent "Ted" D'Amato.

Gift notes:

Gift of Clare and Arnold Kivelson.

Gift of Gary and Mary McDowell.

Gift of Norman Keim.

Gift of David Tatham and Cleota Reed.

Gift of David H. Stam.

Gift of Robert and Virginia Dewey.

Gift of Mary Jane Woodward.

Gift of Luise and Morton Kaish.

From the Library of Earl Browder.

From the library of Michael Aikey.

Gift of Ray Thompson.

Provenance: John S. Mayfield (donor).

Gift of Anthony Tollin.

Gift of Albert and Helen Fowler from the Approach Archives.

Manuscript note template:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for the manuscript collection ...

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for a portion of the manuscript collection ...

Plastics collection notes

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for several manuscript, archival, and artifact collections in the history of plastic.

On deposit from the National Plastics Center.

Citation notes

  • For Mickenberg (used for children's literature): and Rideout (Radical novel in U.S.)
    • Tales for little rebels : a collection of radical children's literature / edited by Julia L. Mickenberg ... 2008. $c p. ...
    • Learning from the left : children's literature, the Cold War, and radical politics in the United States / Julia L. Mickenberg. 2005. $c p. ...
  • For Rideout (Radical novel in U.S.)
    • The radical novel in the United States 1900-1954 / Walter B. Rideout. ‡c p. 293.
  • For Richmond (Shaker Coll.)
    • Richmond, M.L.H. Shaker lit., $c 482

Genre headings (655 field)

Genre headings describe what the item is, not what it is about.

Curators will decide when the genre heading is required; certain projects have genre heading policies. There is no overall policy for their use. If they appear in OCLC records being used, leave them in the record as long as they are relevant

Some genre headings relate to material characteristics, such as:

  • Authors' inscriptions (Provenance)|2 rbprov
  • Inscriptions (Provenance)|2 rbprov
  • Wrappers (Binding)|2 rbbin
  • Dust jackets (Binding)|2 rbbin
  • Bookplates (Provenance)|2 rbprov
  • Ink stamps (Provenance)|2 rbprov

In-analytics: cataloguing component part(s)

These procedures allow a part or section of a larger work to be catalogued on its own record. Procedures are invoked when an item is of interest, not as an entity, but because of specific content.

Policy In cases where a chapter, short story, or essay within a monograph, or, an article in a periodical issue, is the reason the larger item is in SCRC, that specific content will be catalogued. Examples include Stephen Crane stories published in Harper's or another magazine; feature articles on writers, designers, artists of interest to SCRC.

Procedures

  • Search component part on OCLC. There are many examples of these records already there.
  • Creating a workform
    • Use basic monographic record, changing BLvl from m to a (monographic compenent part)
    • Transcribe title and statement of responsibility in field 245.
    • Add name main entry, if present.
    • Do not add field 260 (imprint information is recorded in field 773)
    • Add 300, giving span of pages in sub-field a:
      • $a p. 100-122 : $b ill. ; $c 25 cm.
    • Add 500-note giving source of title. Many are caption titles.
    • Add appropriate subject headings from component part being catalogued.
    • Assign call number based on subject content of component part.
    • Add 773 (Host item) field, providing title and publication information about the larger item.
      • Use first indicator 0 [zero] which creates OPAC message: In
      • (monographic host item):
        • $a International Criminal Police Organization. $t Great cases of Interpol. $b 1st ed. $d Pleasantville, N.Y. : Reader's Digest Association, c1982. $w (OCoLC)8451518
      • (serial host item):
        • $a Bibliographica (London, England) $t Bibliographica. $d London : Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner and Co., 1895. $g Pt. 1 $w (DLC) 05035454 $w (OCoLC)4583093

Monographic treatment of periodical or other serial theme issues

  • Search theme title on OCLC.
  • Creating the workform
    • Transcribe title and statement of responsibility in field 245.
    • Add name or other main entry, if present.
    • Add 260 field as usual.
    • Add 300 (pagination may be a span of pages)
    • Add 500-note giving source of title. Many are cover or caption titles.
    • Add 500-note: Published as v. 1, no. 3 (Dec. 1999) of Journal of ...
    • Add appropriate subject headings based on the content of the theme issue.
    • Assign call number based on subject content of the theme issue.
    • Add 730 for the journal title (check the bibliographic record for the journal; some have uniform title entries in field 130; that form of the title should be transcribed in the 730)
    • Generally do not consider the journal title to be a series (a few are set up this way and go with that decision when appropriate; verify in the authority file)

Multipart monographs

These are monographs issued in more than one physical piece, in multiple volumes, parts, etc. Some things to watch out for:

  • Treatment:
    • As a set: single bibliographic record with a holdings record listing volumes held (most fall in this category)
    • Analyzed: separate bibliographic records for each volume, with the set title traced as 8xx series.
      • How to decide:
        • Is there a series authority record?
        • What's on the title page: the set title is prominent, or is another title given precedence? Collected works of major writers and composers are nearly always analyzed to provide full access to titles, etc.

Cataloguing monographic sets / multipart monographs

  • Call numbers: Like other monographs, multi-parts have a date in the call number; date is determined by the publication date of the first volume published (this may or may not be vol. 1).
  • Do all parts have the same publisher?
    • If not, add additional publisher information in a 500-note:
    • Subsequent publishers: William M. Swain & Co., 1857-64; George W. Childs, 1864. OR use alternative phrasing:
    • Vols. 3- published: Syracuse, N.Y. : Post Standard, 1902-
  • Physical description:
    • 300 $a indicates number of volumes: 4 v.
    • 300 $a is simply v. in cases where the title is still being published, or the total number is unknown.
    • 300 $a lists the number of volumes published, not the number held by SCRC.
    • 300 $a may list pages in parentheses following the number of volumes.
      • 2 v. (290, 384 p.) [each volume begins numbering with p. 1]
      • 2 v. (1050 p.) [there is one sequence of numbering across 2 or more volumes]
      • For basic cataloguing, this is not necessary; do not remove if information appears in OCLC record being used.
  • Holdings record
    • Click on leader; indicate type v for multipart holdings.
    • Volumes held must be listed in 866-field(s) on holding record.
    • Record consecutive holdings as a single statement in the same 866-field: v.1-v.4 (use authorized abbreviations from AACR2; use captions in language of the piece; no spaces)
    • In the case of gaps in volumes held, create additional 866-fields:
      • 866 ... v.1-v.2
      • 866 ... v.5
      • 866 ... v.10

Multiple titles bound in a single physical volume

These procedures cover titles originally published separately and bound together subsequent to publication. Under the best circumstances, they can be easily distinquished from titles issued together by a publisher by individual title pages and other sources of information, such as pagination, running titles, colophon information, etc.

  • Create a list of the titles bound together; include Title / Author. Date; Title / Author. Date .....
  • Catalog the first title bound in; create a holdings record (include 866 $z Bound with other titles) and item record as usual.
    • In the bibliographic record for the first title bound in, add a 590 Bound with: note listing all the titles in the order in which they are bound
  • Catalog each subsequent title; do not create holdings or item records for these. See below for serials exception.
    • In the bibliographic record for each of the subsequent titles bound in, add a 590 note: Bound with Title / Author of the first title bound in. Date; and [number] of other titles.
    • Bound with: Pere Goriot / Honore de Balzac. 1872; and 5 other titles.
  • Make a list of the bibliographic record numbers for the subsequent titles.
  • Display the item record created for the first title and link each subsequent Bib record number to that item record.

The serials exception: If one or more titles are serials, create a holdings record listing the issues held in the usual way.

  • Do not create an item record
  • Following the holdings statement, add $z Bound with other titles. For status search title: (include title of the first monograph bound in)

Transfers

Occasionally, curators will determine that a title, currently residing in general collections, should be transferred to SCRC because of its age, content, or need for greater protection.

Procedures:

Nearly all these have records on SUMMIT, but the records have SU (general colelctions) rather than the SP (SCRC) owning Library.

  • Bibliographic record:
    • Click on Record and Change owning Library; select SP; save record to database.
    • Evaluate record; if not fully AACR-2 format, or, if SUMMIT record lacks OCLC number, find record on OCLC and overlay SUMMIT version if OCLC has a fuller version. Verify holdings are set on OCLC (there are always a few that have slipped through).
    • Edit record on SUMMIT if OCLC version also outdated.
    • In most cases, little or no additional information needs to be added to the record (curator slip will indicate any changes)
    • Add date to call number, if lacking.
  • MARC holdings record:
    • Change location to spec
    • Add date to call number if lacking.
  • Item record(s):
    • Change Perm. Loc. to spec
    • Change item type to non-circulating.
  • Statistics:
    • Count as 1 title transferred.
    • There will be a piece count (since these items are being added to SCRC); if more volumes than 1 are being trasferred for a title, change piece count appropriately.

Statistics

Refer to the 948 statistics definitions for the full details. The 948 counts transactions, formats, and pieces added or withdrawn and identifies the operator.

The most common transactions add materials to the collections through purchase, gift, and transfer (from general colledtions). All of these have piece counts; most involve print monographs or print serials. New title transactions cover cataloguing a title for the first time. Added volume or copy transactions cover adding pieces to a title already catalogued. New title and adds transactions involve both purchased and gift items.

NOTE: When cataloguing materials whose acquistion details are unknown, consider these as gifts, unless they have paper invoices or order slips in them. Transfers from general collections are identified by having call numbers on spines, barcodes, and propoerty stamps or plates.

When handling titles with SUMMIT records, there is no piece count. These transactions include recataloguing (to correct errors or enhance the record) and reclassification (changing the call number from Dewey to LC, or unclassified to LC. Recataloguing may involve overlaying the existing SUMMIT record with an updated OCLC record and making corrections directly on SUMMIT.

When dealing with items having a card catalogue record, but no SUMMIT, there is no piece count; these are retrospective conversion transactions; whenever SU Library's holdings symbol is added to OCLC, count transaction as a retrospective conversion.

When adding volumes or issues to a serial or multi-volume set, use the add transactions for either gifts or purchased items as appropriate.

Cataloguing workflows

All new titles--gift, purchase, or transfer--go from cataloguing to the Conservation Lab. At this point items are indicated as "In process [date]" in SUMMIT. Books are placed on a truck in the manuscripts workroom and are labeled Catalogued with a date range. When a truck is full, it is taken to the north wall near the Ranke desk.

Conservation staff retrieve trucks from the north wall and take them to the Lab for endprocessing. These routines include: affixing bookplates to items and call number flags to envelopes and other containers and creating mylar covers for items with dust jackets. In addition, items are evaluated and conservation staff treat and rehouse them as necessary, and finally, verify that call numbers on flags are correct.

When finished, staff remove the "in process" status and take trucks to be shelved in the collection.

What this means when searching for books:

  • In process titles should be in one of 3 places: trucks in the Processing room or near Ranke's desk; or, in the Conservation Lab.
  • Items not there and not in the stacks may be awaiting shelving, either on trucks or on the shelves, or, mis-shelved.

Descriptive Cataloging for Rare Materials (DCRM)

Some SCRC materials require more detailed description. DCRM mandates fuller transcription which more closely reflects the specific details of an item, more detailed physical descrptions, and additional notes and other elements. Generally curators decide whether DCRM is required. Upstate New York 19th-century imprints are described using DCRM (books).

Introduction

Descriptive cataloging of rare materials (Books) (DCRM(B)) was published in 2007 and prepared by the Bibliographic Standards committee of the Rare Books and Manuscripts section of the American Library Association. DCRM(B) represents a revision of the 1991 Descriptive cataloging of rare books and expands coverage from hand-press printed books to include machine-made books. In addition sections on series and an expanded appendix on early letter forms and symbols were added.

While the prescribed sources of information remain the same, in the first three areas, if information comes from somewhere other than the title page (even if it is prescribed), make a note. Any information from a non-prescribed source must be bracketed. There is little or no transposition, abridgement or modernization for transcription. If there is an occasion to use transposition (i.e., a author's name is printed before a title, rather than as part of a title), a note is required to explain the transposition. Information for different areas of description can be considered "inseparable". In those cases, provide them in the area that they are connected to (i.e., a statement of responsibility is inseparable from a title), and do not repeat the information in the area to which it would naturally belong. Resources may be used to provide information or direct descriptive elements such as: Descriptive bibliographies can be cited for references. If a descriptive bibliography is being cited, use Standard Citation Forms for Rare Book Cataloging. This is available in Cataloger's Desktop. Dealer's descriptions may be included with new books purchased. These descriptions can include detail on bindings, printings and other descriptive elements.

 

When should DCRM be used?

This will be determined and communicated to catalogers by curators.

Transcribing early letter forms:

Transcribing I V i j u v:

  • Do I need to convert case according to AACR2 Appendix A? No? Transcribe letter and case as it appears (keeping in mind the tricky circumstances of upper-case gothic)
  • If I do need to convert the case of an I, V, i, j, u, or v: determine the typeface, function, and position of letter to be transcribed
    • is the letter in roman, italic, or gothic?
    • does the letter function as a consonant or a vowel?
    • is it positioned in the initial, medial, or final position of the word?
  • Then I find usage in the text usage of that letter in the same typeface, function, and position in the case in which I must render it.
    • Most conversion involves transcribing ‘V’ to either ‘u’ or ‘v’
    • Most of the time, "v" is used in the initial position, while ‘u’ is used elsewhere, regardless of whether the V v u is functioning as a consonant or vowell. English examples: vsury, nauigation
    • A good deal of the time, the usage of the letter in the text in the same typeface, function, and position can be found on the title page itself, or within the preliminaries. If found, run with it: don’t go looking for confirmation elsewhere in the text.
    • ‘ii’ or ‘ij’—frequently needed to transcribe place names in Latin--can be challenging to find in the text. **Now, I have a rule of thumb for myself and the catalogers’ I supervise: **If after 5 minutes, I haven’t found the corresponding usage, I go to the table.
    • This happens in even less than 5 minutes when cataloging something common in Italian imprints: the title page is in roman, but the text is entirely in italic. If the printer’s roman usage cannot be found on the title page, then you can’t use the italic text to verify it—you must go directly to the table.

 

245

The basic principle behind DCRB requires complete and accurate transcription of information. This is especially important for the title and statement of responsibility.

Title proper and other title information Transcribe the title proper and other title information as it appears in the item. If a title is very lengthy, a mark of omission may be used, but only after the sixth word and only less important words. Continue the transcription to the end of the chief title of the publication. Non-title elements can be part of the title statement and may appear before title elements. These should be transcribed in the order they appear if they are part of the title. If any part of the title is transposed, provide a note. Generally treat volume information as Other title information.

Statement of responsibility

The statement of responsibility should be transcribed as it appears on the page. This includes information such as titles of nobility, address, honor and distinction that may appear with the names in the statement of responsibility. Omit such things as initials indicating membership to societies or academic degrees if it is possible to do so grammatically, unless they are used for identification or the author is represented only a pseudonym, descriptive phrase or non alphabetic symbols. Use the mark of omission for anything that has been omitted. Noun phrases indicating the role of the person or body named in the statement of responsibility should be transcribed as part of the statement of responsibility. A short phrase may be used in brackets to indicate function. Expansions, explanations or corrections to the statement of responsibility should be made in a note. When more than one author is listed, list all names in the order they appear. If more than three authors are listed, list the first three names, and include [et al.]. Phrases that do not name an individual or corporate body can still be considered a statement of responsibility.

 

250

The edition statement is a critical area of distinction between different copies of the same work. Edition statements should be included whenever they appear in a work, and if known to be erroneous, it should be noted. In addition, if a bookdealer indicates that something is a particular edition, include that information in a note, not in the Edition Area.

 

260

The area of publication is another critical area for identification of an item. Transcribe in full the publication statement as it appears on the work, including all places and publishers. In many cases explanatory information can be provided in brackets (i.e., modern place names). Corrections can also be provided in brackets, with the addition of an explanatory note.

Give publisher's name in its complete form; this form may be the only way to differentiate between editions.

Include ALL printing information

Dates can be very difficult in DCRB. Not only are there many different dates represented on a work, there are many ways to represent a date. In addition, there are two different calendars used in dating early works (Julian and Gregorian).

  • Transcribe impression dates when they are given and the are later than the publication date.
  • Transcribe Roman numerals and add Arabic numerals in square brackets.
  • Transcribe a date expressed in words and add Arabic numerals in square brackets.
    • If appropriate, add 500-note: Imprint date from chronogram.
  • Transcribe words associated with the date statement such as "anno" or "printed in the year of our Lord".
  • If a date is known to be fictious or inaccurate, transcribe it as it appears and provide the accurate date in brackets.

300

The physical description of items is also an important deviation from AACR2R. In this area, every single leaf is counted despite the pagination statement, including inserted pages, plates, etc. To recreate the item as closely as possible, there are several different aspects to physical description. Some are handled in the 300 field while others are notes that are expressed in the 5XX fields.

Count every leaf. Include in brackets all unnumbered pages or leaves. If the pages are numbered in terms of leaves, use a leaf count put include a note indicating that the leaves are printed on both sides. Note misnumbered pages in a parenthetical statement at the end of |a and include a note explaining the parenthetical statement.

300 ix, [1], 838 p. (i.e. 388 p.) 500 p. 388 misnumbered 838.

Note folded leaves using either (folded) or (some folded) in the pagination statement. Note incomplete copies with a "+" at the last page in the library's copy and a note indicating that the copy is missing pages after that number. Format refers to the size of the paper that the pages were printed on. Four common formats are: folio, quarto, octavo, and duodecimo. These names refer to the number of time a sheet of paper had to be folded to create the leaves of the gatherings. Note the format at the end of the |c. The location of watermarks, the size and shape of the volume or the number of leaves can be used to distinguish the format. 300 |c 18 cm (8vo)

5XX

DCRB makes particular use of the notes area to discuss the elements of a particular item. As seen above, any deviation needs to be included in a note. Other descriptive elements only belong to notes.


Mandatory notes

Source of information is not the chief source of information. Any deviation from a strict transcription of evidence. The presence of errata The presence of wrappers or dust jackets The presence of half-title pages Signature statement if signatures appear in the item.


510 CITATION NOTE

For DCRB cataloging a 510 should always be given if the work is cited in BAL, Bristol, Evans, STC or Wing (see DCBR p. 63). The form should follow the guidelines in Standard Citation Forms.

Other Access points

Illustrators Added entries for illustrators be made on a case-by-case basis by the curator on the curator cataloging slip.

Use both |e Relator term (spelled out, not abbreviated) and |4 Relator code in our 7XX fields. The relator term will describe the relationship between the personal or corporate name and the item (for example, illustrator, engraver, lithographer). The relator code is a three-character code that indicates the relationship of the entry to the item. We will always use ill in the $4 field. See USMARC Code List-Relator Codes-Term Sequence for more information.

 

Printers Added entries for printers will be created on a case-by-case basis. Use appropriate relator terms and codes. (see Illustrator sample above) This decision is made by the curator pre-cataloging.

Bookbinders Added entries for bookbinders will be created on a case by case basis. Use appropriate relator terms and codes. (see bookbinder ticket sample above). This decision is made by the curator pre-cataloging.


See GENRE HEADING info in previous section.

Science fiction monograph procedures

Many titles have SUMMIT records, which should be overlaid as part of this project. The current project began in the summer of 2010.

  • Generally existing SUMMIT records contain:
    • Binding descriptions, including both binding and dust jackets for hardback eds.
    • Added entries for publishers in some cases, eg, Gnome Press, but not Avon.
    • Series statements (if title part of series) or quoted notes for publisher series.
  • but lack:
    • Genre headings
    • Illustrator for dozen or so looked at.
    • CONTENTS or author/title added entries for anthologies.

Bibliographic record framework:

  • Names:
    • Some authors have both authorized form and assigned author number; others have form, but no numbers; others have member-assigned numbers; some none.
    • AF records often have pseudonyms.
  • Classification:
    • Many, but not all authors are American and will class in PS; English authors in PR, and other nationalities with appropriate national literature.
    • Some books are not fiction, eg, biography of Boris Karloff by Ackerman.
    • Anthologies of mixed authorship will class outside author runs and, as per AACR2, will not have editor or compiler main entry.
  • Anthologies: serial vs. monograph treatment
    • If only serial records found on OCLC, generally treat item as a serial and add contributor notes and entries for those writers whose papers are held in SCRC.
    • If both serial and monographic records are found on OCLC for most volumes, monographic treatment should be considered and preferred for most cases; the enhanced contents will provide key word access to the contents.
    • see below for monographic guidelines
  • Currently these books are in a separate collection; as we work through them they will be integrated into the basic LC collection.
    • Holdings record and item record location is spec
    • Make changes as necessary to existing SUMMIT records.


Bibliographic record standards and workflow:

  • Search title on SUMMIT.
  • Classification:
    • When necessary, Chas will have created author number, checking against LC catalogue online; staff cataloguer will Cutter by title. Classify anthologies consisting of works by one author with individual works by that author.
    • Anthologies will class in appropriate PN, PS, or other numbers. Each number of an anthology series must have a unique Cutter number; be aware of how many volumes are held while assigning Cutter numbers and proceed accordingly.
    • Non-fiction books will class where subject takes them.
  • Author names: For authors lacking authority records, Chas will have checked http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/ to see if pseudonyms apply. He will also have created a local authority file record. For authors with an authority record, but no call number, he will have added call number to AF record.
  • Illustrators: Note and trace if available on piece, either in formal statement, or, if discernible from signature on cover (use a magnifying glass). Since cover signatures are sometimes educated guesses, verify in Science Fiction and Fantasy artists, temporarily in workroom, and in SUMMIT authority file (AF). If artist not listed and is not in AF, do a Google search for the illustrator’s name combined with the title of the book in hand. If that fails, include the name if you are certain of the spelling; if not, ignore.
  • Publishers: If SCRC holds the publisher archive, trace publisher in a 710. Publishers held are: Ace Books, Galaxy Publishing, Gnome Press, Mercury Press, Street & Smith.
  • If we have a printing other than the first, include that information in a 500-note, or in sub-field g of field 260. To bring science fiction into conformity with other colloections, use the printing date in the call number (this policy took effect after the project began)
  • Series: verify in AF. Use a quoted note if no AF record for “series like” statements. Include series numbers as part of series transcription. If the item in hand is part of a group of related titles by the author, mention in a 500-note, unless a formal series has been established.
  • Binding notes: leave in records that have them; do not add to titles being catalogued for the first time.
  • Dust jackets: As per basic procedures, mention in 500-note; also note any jacket illustrators or designers who are mentioned and trace names in 7xx.
  • Items published in different versions (revised, restored, re-edited) under varying titles:
    • Explain relationships in 500-notes, using such phrases as “Originally published as … “ (There is no need to go into great detail here.) Trace any titles noted in 740-entries.
    • Base title Cutter number on the title on the piece being catalogued (titles do not need to sit together on the shelf)
    • Do not assign a uniform title.
    • Titles originally published in periodicals:
      • Create 500-note.
      • Trace periodical title in 730-entry; use title of periodical in place at the time story was published.
      • Trace story title in 740-entry.
  • Double books or a tete a beche items: Use the two-record option, with appropriate linking notes.
    • Catalogue one title, basing the description on the title page and using a call number appropriate to this title.
    • In field 300, input the pagination of the title being catalogued.
    • Create a 501-note in the form:
      • With this is bound (inverted) as issued: the author's The ultimate weapon. New York, [1966]. or
      • With this is bound (inverted) as issued: Planeteers / John W. Campbell. New York, [1966].
    • Catalogue the 2nd title on its own record, with a 501-note; use the call number established for the first title.
    • Create a holdings record and item record for the first title and link that item record to the bibliographic record number for the second title.
    • Add any additional copies to the established call number, even if these are currently filed under different authors.
  • Other local notes:
    • If book plate in item mentions the donor, create a 590 gift of note.
    • If the author is someone whose papers are held in SCRC, create the note:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript collection of [name].

  • Subject headings (for works of fiction only):

NOTE: Use 655 7 Fantasy fiction. ǂ2 gsafd (or another heading if more appropriate).

    • Also, if appropriate [a few titles seem not to be science fiction], use LCSH: Science fiction, American [English, etc.]
  • Anthologies:
    • Always create enhanced contents note (505 00); see OCLC MARC field help for how to format this note.
    • Analyze contents (700 author/title entries) for authors whose collections are in SCRC. See attached list. Do not add local note referencing the manuscript collection for these.
  • OCLC has a constant data record to cover the main fields, subjects, notes, etc; use this a a starting point to enhance the record.
  • Preservation
    • Items that are in good shape:
      • Write call number at bottom of the bookplate.
      • Place in the new materials to be shelved range
      • Remove the In process item status.
    • Place on conservation truck:
      • Items with loose pages or bindings.
      • Item lackings a bookplate.
  • Statistics : use 2 948 fields (no piece count needed):
    • Count as items with existing SUMMIT records as Titles recatalogued.
    • Count items lacking SUMMIT records as Titles retrospectively converted.
    • Count all items as Titles reclassified (more accurately classified)

Science fiction (41 collections)

  • Fantasy & Science Fiction Magazine Collection
  • Science fiction fanzines and ephemera
  • Science fiction periodicals
  • Ace Books Records
  • Forrest J. Ackerman Papers
  • Piers Anthony Papers
  • Hal Clement Papers
  • Stanton A. Coblentz Papers
  • Theodore R. Cogswell Papers
  • Betsy Curtis Manuscript
  • Eastern Science Fiction Association Records
  • Galaxy Publishing Company Records
  • Hugo Gernsback Papers
  • Gnome Press Records
  • H.L. Gold
  • Harvey Jacobs Papers
  • William F. Jenkins Papers
  • Neil R. Jones Papers
  • David H. Keller Papers
  • Jay Kay Klein Photographs
  • Damon Knight Papers
  • David A. Kyle Papers
  • Keith Laumer Papers
  • Frederick A. Lerner Correspondence
  • Robert A. W. Lowndes Papers
  • Anne McCaffrey Papers
  • Mercury Press Records
  • Larry Niven
  • Andre (Alice Mary) Norton Papers
  • Frederik Pohl Papers
  • Fletcher Pratt Papers
  • Science Fiction Writers of America
  • Nevil Shute Papers
  • Robert Silverberg Papers
  • Street & Smith Publishers Records
  • Harry C. Stubbs
  • Universal Publishers Corporation Records
  • Kate Wilhelm Papers
  • Richard Wilson Papers
  • Donald A. Wollheim Papers
  • Roger Zelazny Papers

New York State Printing Collection

SCRC collects multiple editions, printing variants, and copies of books published in upstate New York, defined roughly as extending from Hudson north and from Albany west. To facilitate identification of variants, items will be described in sufficient detail, frequently following DCRM standards. Each printing will have its own bibliographic record. Precise duplicates will be indicated as numbered copies and may have the same bibliographic record. However, details of provenance, etc. may justify separate records. In most cases, edit the OCLC record for the edition tor reflect printing and other issuing details. While we do not generally add entries for publishers, printers, and engravers (unless instructed by the curators), do not delete these entries from OCLC records if they are present.

BACKGROUND: A separate New York collection exists; however, current receipts are not routinely being added here. The exceptions include exact added copies and related items, such as added volumes to serials and sets. If in doubt, catalogue for the main LC collection. In addition, several publishers, such as Joel Munsell of Albany, had been classified using a locally-developed scheme based on place of publication. Due both to space limitations and the desire to streamline procedures, this practice has been discontinued, except in the cases mentioned above.

The checklist below is based on AACR2 and DCRM conventions and are applied for all items published before 1900 and selected items published more recently. Generally use AACR2 for these until DCRM is redrafted to the RDA context. However, if hybrid, or full RDA records are found, do not edit them back to AACR2.

Checklist:

  • Full title-page transcription: Unless exceptionally long, include complete subtitles and other title information, including honorifics and other descriptive information relating to the author. Use ellipsis when omitting information other than quotations, Bible verses and the like which may be “silently omitted” (e.g., left out without using an ellipsis).
  • Imprint: generally include all places and publishers. If more than three, omit using ellipsis and the appropriate bracketed text. Include all New York publishers no matter how far down the list they appear. Examples:
    • Rochester [N.Y] : ‡b Published by George H. Ellis ; ‡a New York : ‡b Wm. A. Pond & Co. ; ‡a Buffalo : ‡b J.R. Blodgett ... [and 3 others in 3 other places], ‡c c1864.
    • Boston : ‡b Oliver Ditson, Washington St. ... [4 others] ; ‡a New York : ‡b S.T. Gordon, ‡c c1856.
    • Include printing information, if present (260 $e $f $g)
  • Dates: Check t.p. verso and preliminaries for any “copyright” dates. These may differ from what is printed on t.p.
    • 260 $c : Use publication dates only. If there is no t.p. date and a copyright date on the verso, use that date in brackets in 260 $c and add a 500-note about the date:
      • Copyright statement dated 1850 on t.p. verso.
      • "Entered, according to Act of Congress in the year 1866 ... in the clerk's office of the Dist. Court of the U.S., for the Southern District of New York"—T.p. verso
      • If the t.p. year differs from the copyright year, include the same note.
      • 260 $g: Use dates that indicate printing or impression if these vary from the publication date: $g (1865 printing)
        • Add 500 note, if necessary, giving source of this date: Date of Impression from t.p. verso.
  • Editions: Transcribe edition statement exactly as it appears in the item; do not use abbreviations and include any printing information as part of the edition statements:
    • The second edition, 51,000st-100,000th
    • Indicate source of that information if not on t.p. in a 500 note:
   The words 51,000st-100,000th taken from t.p. verso.
  • Complete pagination statements which account for all blank pages and all numbered sequences:
    • Include each sequence of numbering and any blank pages between sequences:
      • iii, [2], 88 p.
      • [8], 328 p.
    • Consider numbered sequences to include unnumbered pages falling logically within the sequence, counting back from the first recorded number to 1:
      • [2], 40 p. (pages are numbered 3-40 with 2 unnumbered pages at the beginning)
      • [2], 5-40 p. (pages are numbered 5-40 with 2 unnumbered pages at the beginning with no evidence of anything missing)
    • For multi-volumes sets, whose pagination is not continuous, include pagination for each volume as the first 500-note:
  Vol. 1: xx, 202 p.; v. 2: xiv, 154 p.
    • Record the number of leaves of pages of plates at the end of the sequences of pagination:
      • 246 p., [24] leaves of plates
      • x, 250 p., 12 pages of plates
  • Indicate the presence of publisher’s advertisements if they are integral to the publication:
    • 124 p. / 500 note: Publisher’s advertisements on p. 119-124.
    • 121, [3] / 500 note: Publisher’s advertisements on [3] p. at end.
    • 124, 8 p. / 500 note: Publisher’s advertisements on p. 1-4, 2nd sequence.
  • Make a local note for publisher's advertisements not integral to the publication:
    • Library copy has publisher's catalog on an additional 8 p. at end.
  • Simple binding descriptions in 590 notes:
    • Bound in half leather and marbled paper over boards.
    • Bound in embossed brown cloth, stamped in gold on spine.
    • Bound in leather.
    • Rebound in buckram (use as appropriate for obviously rebound items)
    • Library's copy as issued in buff paper wrappers.
    • Library's copy formerly bound (for items clearly disbound, with traces of glue and other binding remnants on spine)
  • Include local notes about imperfections:
    • Library's copy lacks wrappers.
    • Library's copy imperfect: all pages after 153 are missing.
  • Provenance notes (590)
    • Include all legible names found in item and indicate if these are from bookplates, inscriptions, ink stamps, pasted on labels, etc.
      • Mrs. Robert Hughes, Cazeonvia (autograph); J. W. Jones Esq. (bookplate); Marcellus Public Library (ink stamp) etc and etc. Generally use a single note unless there is something lengthy.
      • Practice has varied about whether to indicate where this data appears. Reording names is more important than where the stamp or writing is located.
  • Subject analysis.
    • Topical, geographical, or name subject headings are needed if appropriate.
    • Always add:
         650  0  Printing $z New York (State) $z Solvay $v Specimens.
  • Added entry, hierarchical place name:
          752     United States $b New York $d Syracuse. 
  • Dates in Call numbers:
    • Use printing date if different from edition date
    • Use a single workletter for different printings/versions from the same year
  • For items that are exact duplicates, use c.1, c.2 etc.

Grove Press Procedures

Overview: these will receive standard AACR-2 cataloguing, with the addition of the local notes indicated below. Standard call number guidelines apply: Follow LC except use full author numbers for fiction and not PZ1-PZ4 in use for some authors prior to 1980. Items will remain a separate collection.

  • Call numbers:
    • If PZ-fiction call number is all that is found on OCLC, check both the author’s authority record, LC's online catalogue, and SUMMIT to determine if a full author number has been established either by LC, or locally. If not, establish a call number, taking care not to duplicate a number in use by LC.
    • Some works are anonymous; if questions on instructions on ClassWeb for anonymous works, refer to Chas. Check items in the Grove Press Victorian Library to see if they are reprints of Victorian-era titles, or newly created ones. Generally, these have PR, not PS, call numbers.
  • Series statements: A number of titles were issued as part of a series. Follow the authority file’s current treatment (OCLC records reflect varying practice). Series statements may appear only on dust jackets or paperback covers. Some series have become quoted notes.
  • Include 500-note: Dust jacket when appropriate.
  • Include 500-note: Publisher’s no.:
  • Local notes (590):
    • The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the Grove Press Archive.
    • Gift of Grove Press.
    • NOTE: Some volumes are plated for other donors; for those, include the first 590-note and change the second to reflect the named donor.
  • Duplicates: At most, one copy of the hard-bound and one copy of the paperback will be retained. Place duplicates on the designated truck in the workroom. If there are several hard-bound copies, retain one with a dust jacket or annotations. Retain variant printings; include printing information in 500-note or sub-field g of field 260 as appropriate. Use printing date in call number.
    • For the paperback, add 500-note: Paperback.
    • Designate these as c.1 and c.2 unless the printing dates are different or the hard-bound and paperback have different series statements. In the latter case use workletter “b” after the date to differentiate the call numbers.
  • The holdings record and book flag:
    • location: spec,grov
    • field 852 $k Grove
    • book flag: use Grove as the call number preface.
  • Conservation: Most books can go directly for shelving. Items with dust jackets, or in some way in need of repair, will go to Conservation. Items lacking plates also go to Conservation for plating.

Supplemental books (foreign language and other related items)

  • Follow the basic procedures as outlined above.
  • Set aside exact duplicates and retain all printing and other variants.
  • For titles lacking donor plates, verify the title against the 5 lists provided by the Grove archivist.
    • Insert Gift of Grove Press curator slips for items on the lists.
    • Send all items needing plates or any type of repair to Conservation.

Balzac Collection Procedures

Background: Rare book dealer William Hobart Royce dedicated himself to collecting, collating, and codifying all Balzac references in any literature. His book collections comprise both Dewey books, catalogued in the 1950s, and items never catalogued. The Dewey cards may be found in a separate Balzac shelflist; items were catalogued to highlight the Balzac connection when this was not immedicately obvious. Virtually none of these items are on SUMMIT. The purpose of this project is to retrospectively convert the Dewey portion of the collection, add our holdings symbol to OCLC, reclassify and integrate the collection into the SCRC's Library of Congress holdings. The collection will remain a virtual one, through the addition of a local note. A second project to catalogue fully the never-before catalogued items will follow.

Preparation:

  • Pull books from Aisle 22
  • Pull the corresonding shelflist cards for each book (if there is no book for a given card, leave the card in the shelflist; if there is a book with no card, catalogue the item)
  • A number of cards are indicated as c.2; so far, the copy 2 has referred to the total number of copies in the Library, general collections and Arents (the name used at the time for special collections). Use copy 2 ONLY if there is another exact copy in SCRC's main LC collection.

General considerations:

  • Pay special attention to the details of printing, issuing, etc., especially in cases of multiple copies. Experience to date indicates these are rarely exact duplicates.
  • Examine items carefully for physical details: binding, presence of original wrappers, inscriptions, laid in or affixed materials, bookplates (other than the Royce collection ones), and other evidence of provenance.
  • In cases of a single copy, generally there is no need for a binding note; however, when there are multiple copies, one as issued and one bound, include binding notes for both.
  • Add entries for all names mentioned in 245 $c--editors, translators, illustrators, etc.

Cataloguing guidelines:

  • Use full level AACR2 cataloguing.
  • Apply OCLC's online Balzac constant data to create the 590 note: William Hobart Royce Balzac Collection.
  • Read through the cards (in some cases, it may be necessary to pull the main entry card from the card catalogue in the north east corner of the stacks area); transfer any notes, content information to the online record. Use 500 for general notes and 590 for copy specific notes.
  • Add all Balzac references (500-notes) and entries from the bottom of the cards (7xx access points).
  • For items printed by Balzac, include 260 $e and $f to record the printer, and a 7xx entry for Balaac,... $e printer. $4 prt
  • Contents relating to Balzac:
    • Use field 505 20 for any partial contents relating to Balzac; include page numbers as indicated on the cards.
    • If the record has a complete contents note, leave the note in, adding page numbers for Balzac items, and upgrading to an enhanced contents if necessary.
  • Always create 700 1 name/title entries for Balzac works that appear as part of a more general literary anthology.
    • Use $l to indicate language if version is not in French.
    • Use $k Selections if item is not complete.
  • Always create 740 02 title entries for Balzac works that appear as part of a more general literary anthology; also use 740 02 for any titles that are used to refer to parts of a large work.
  • To be determined: level of analysis for anthologies consisting solely of Balzac's works. Add a formatted contents note; we may need to determine how many added entries to make from that note and once examples are encountered, we will have a better basis for making the decision.

Literary call numbers:

  • Use LC's author call numbers when available.
  • Assign numbers if needed, using LC's online catalogue to determine where call number should fit in.
  • Always do an author search in LC's catalogue to see if they had ever assigned an author number for the individual.

End processing guidelines:

  • Make sure item has a William Hobart Royce Balzac Collection book plate. It not, send to Conservation for a plate.
  • Send any items in need of conservation treatment or evaluation to Conservation.
  • Items that do not need bookplate or treatment, write call number at base of bookplate and place on the new title shelvling after removing the In process status.

Statistics: Count each title as one retrospective conversion and one reclassification.

Kamin Dance Collection Procedures

Overview: Martin Kamin was bookseller and publisher in the area of drama and dance. The books, serials, scores, and pamphlets will be catalogued; there may be some ephemeral items best handled as part of the manuscript collection. Many of the items are heavily illustrated; make sure illustrations and plates are accounted for in the physical description and, when appropriate, add name entries for illustrators and photogrpahers. For items published by him, add a name entry for him as publisher. Note items that have his bookseller's label in them.

Titles will receive full-level cataloguing; apply RDA guidelines when updating pre-AACR2 records. Be sure to check institutional records for additional information.

Two 590-notes will be added:

  • Gift of Martin Kamin.
  • The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the Martin Kamin Papers.

An OCLC constant data record, Kamin, has been created.

Juvenile Literature Procedures

Overview: Juvenile literature will remain a distinct and named collection. It is a finite collection, the majority of titles acquired from Syracuse University's Library School, but with some purchases apparently added later. There is a small subset of items that appear not to be juvenile titles. The will remain with the collection, however. Full-level cataloguing will be used; accept records as they appear whenever possible, removing only incorrect information. You will likely find some dcrbm or dcrb level records. Accept them as is.

Guidelines:

In general, for non-fiction, standard classification practices hold, with books classified according to their subjects. At least one subject heading must be present for non-fiction, usually with free-floating sub-division, Juvenile literature.

For fiction, past practice has varied: juvenile works by authors tend to class under the author numbers, if the author has non-juvenile works in our collections. If not, the juvenile literature number is used. Check Classification Web for the details. Browse call number PZ.

An OCLC constant data record, children's lit, has been created. One 590-note and one genre heading will be created:

  • Local note: Acquired from Syracuse University's Library School as the Children's Literature Study Collection.
  • Genre heading: Juvenile literature

SUMMIT:

  • Use 852 location: spec, chil
  • Use call number preface: $k Juvenile literature.
  • Include call number preface Juvenile literature on the book flag.

Serials

Serials in SCRC: enhancements to records.

 

Overview

The basic guideline is to catalogue serials as serials, even if we own only a single issue, or, only 1 issue was ever published. Annual publications--proceedings, directories, reports--are catalogued as serials (there are many DCRB, or, DCRM-B records for annual issues treated as monographs on OCLC). Do not use these records; if we have monographic records for other issues, retrieve them from the stacks and catalogue the run as a serial.

EXCEPTION: If a single issue of a periodical is a theme issue or contains one or two articles of especial interest to SCRC collections, consider cataloguing the theme issue as a monograph, basing the description on the theme title, or cataloguing the individual article(s) as monographic component parts. Always search OCLC before beginning the workform; there are many such examples on OCLC. Checklists for both these treatments may be found among the monograph procedures.

Differences between general collections cataloging and that for SCRC relate primarily to the following:

All records will be converted to A-2 or RDA format; punctuation and other descriptive elements will be updated. Change the fixed field Desc to a or i as appropriate.

Enhancements for SCRC serials fall into broad categories (the curators will add this information):

A primary enhancement focuses on adding names (editors, contributors, authors, artists, etc) to records to more fully relate the title to collections and other SCRC materials. Whenever additional issues are added, more names may be added based on those new issues. Curators will inform catalogers when this is necessary. In order to clarify the relationship of names to the title, cataloguers will add appropriate relator information, using natural language forms ($e) and appropriate AACR2 abbreviations for terms having them:

Both 500-notes mentioning editors and other contributors and added entries (7xx-fields) for those named must be present.

  • Examples:
    • Editor:
      • 500 Editor: Jan. 1950-Feb. 1960, Arna W. Bontemps. (known span of editorship)
      • 500 Editors: <Dec. 1979-Oct. 1980> Andy Warhol, Paul Morrissey. (dates based on issues in hand)
      • 500 Editor: -Jan. 1950, William Carlos Williams. (only final issue in hand)
      • 500 Editor: Jan. 2000-<Feb. 2000> Gore Vidal. (only 1st 2 issues in hand)
    • Other roles:
      • 500 Cover illustrations for 1950-1970 by Norman Rockwell.
      • 700 1 Rockwell, Norman, |d 1894-1978.
      • 500 Contributors include Joyce Carol Oates, …
      • 700 1 Oates, Joyce Carol, |d 1938- |e contributor. |4 ctb

A second class of enhancements encompasses adding local (590) notes to indicate provenance, relationships to other collections, gift status, or funds used for purchase. Copy-specific characteristics, such as autographed or damaged issues are also created for serials. SCRC serial runs are often the result of multiple purchases or represent issues taken from several different collections. The record documents in some detail how the run was put together.

  • Examples:
    • 590 Vols. 1-5 purchased from Petty Fund, 2006
    • 590 Vol. 3, nos. 4-5 gift of Joyce Carol Oates.
    • 590 Library's copy of v. 1:no.1 signed by Charles C. Lovett.
    • 590 Library's copy of v. 3, no 5 lacks cover.
    • 590 The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript Collection of Arna W. Bontemps. (for serials related to collections of note).

Other notes:

  • "Description based on notes are made for titles lacking them on OCLC and lacking a formatted start date in field 362.
    • 588 Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 3 (Mar. 2011).
  • Source of title notes when cataloguing based on something other than a title page.
    • 500 Cover title. (Most periodicals base description on cover title.
  • Combine notes when both are needed:
    • 500 Description based on: 1994; cover title.
  • “Latest issued consulted” is always made for titles currently published or not closed out in field 362 (and is updated as later issues are added).
    • 588 Latest issue consulted: Vol. 25, no. 1 (Jan. 2010).

Curators may propose both subject headings and a call number, just as with monographs.

Manuscript collections

MARC records for manuscript collections are generated from the EAD files using MarcEdit. If MarcEdit is not used or is not available, a MARC record may be created by viewing the EAD file in a text editor or XML editor, and manually copying the relevant information from the appropriate EAD elements. Those elements may be identified by the "encodinganalog" attribute which maps to the correct MARC field, for example:

A complete mapping of EAD to MARC elements may be found here.

MARC fields of especial interest to manuscripts include the following.

Languages used (041 and 546 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include the language(s) represented in the collection, both in code and in plain English. For example:

  • 041 0 _ |a eng |a fre |a ger
  • 546 _ _ |a Majority in English, some in French and German.

Codes for the 041 data should be the appropriate ISO 639.2 bibliographic codes.

Restrictions (506 and 540 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include a statement of access and usage restrictions. If there are none, use the boilerplate statements as follows:

  • 506 _ _ |a There are no access restrictions on this material.
  • 540 _ _ |a There are no usage restrictions on this material.

If there are restrictions, state them clearly and concisely.

  • 506 _ _ |a Diaries in Box 22 restricted and may not be viewed without permission of the donor or his heirs.
  • 540 _ _ |a Some restrictions on reproduction due to fragile condition of originals.

Preferred citation (524 field)

Manuscript collection records should always include a preferred citation, for example:

  • 524 _ _ |a Anna Hyatt Huntington Papers, Special Collections Research Center, Syracuse University Library

Acquisition information (541 and possibly 590 fields)

Where possible, manuscript collection records should provide the immediate source of acquisition of the material, for example:

  • 541 _ _ |a Gift of Francis Biddle, June 1965 and the Estate of Katherine Chapin Biddle, 1979.
  • 541 _ _ |a Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund, 1996.

If the material was wholly or partially purchased from a fund, also create a 590 note (so it shows up in the brief record), for example:

  • 590 _ _ |a Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund, 1996.
  • 590 _ _ |a Some items purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund, 1996.

See 590 fields below for wording for various funds.

Related material (544 field)

If SUL has related material in its holdings (whether manuscript, rare books, or digital), include references to them. Only reference material that is closely related. For example, in the record for the Fulton Lewis Papers:

  • 544 1 _ |a See also the papers of Lewis' son, Fulton Lewis III.

Or in the record for the Gerrit Smith Papers:

  • 544 1 _ |a More than 200 of Smith’s writings on the subjects of abolitionism, suffrage, transportation, and the postal system have been digitized and are available online in the Gerrit Smith Broadside and Pamphlet Collection. In addition, Syracuse University maintains the Gerrit Smith Virtual Museum, an online exhibit containing biographical information, a bibliography and portrait gallery.

Finding aid information (555 and 856 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include the 555 and 856 fields. The 555 field is a generic boilerplate statement that a finding aid exists. The 856 field provides a link to the EAD finding aid on the SCRC website. SCRC personnel can provide the URL if necessary, or it can be derived from the file name of the EAD document.

Subject headings (600, 610, 630, 650, 651 fields)

Assign subject headings as appropriate, following usual cataloging practice. Useful LCSH subheadings for certain types of primary source material may be found here http://libguides.mit.edu/content.php?pid=71596.

Genre and form (655 field)

Manuscript collection records should always include at least one genre/form field that describes the type of material in the collection. Use as many 655's as needed to describe the material. Terms should come from the Art and Architecture Thesaurus. Subfield 2 specifies the source. For example:

  • 655 _ 7 |a Correspondence. |2 aat
  • 655 _ 7 |a Journals (accounts). |2 aat
  • 655 _ 7 |a Legal files. |2 aat
  • 655 _ 7 |a Memorandums. |2 aat
  • 655 _ 7 |a Photographs. |2 aat

MFHDS: Monographs and Serials

The MARC format for holdings record includes location, call number, and (for multi-part monographs and serials) volume holdings information.

  • The basic location for Dewey and Library of Congress call number is spec (852 ... $b spec $h ...)
  • Specific sub-collections have their own location code. In addition, include the collection name as a call number preface in $k (852 ... $b spec,hill $k Hillyer $h ...)
  • Size considerations:
    • Regular stacks house items 11-28 cm.
    • Miniatures are 10 cm or under.
    • Folios house items 29-49 cm.
    • Flat folios house items 50 cm. and larger

NOTE: Determination of special placement of material may also depend on the condition of the material and is sometimes made in consultation with the Preservation staff.

How many records?

Generally, for monographs, all SCRC copies are on separate records because of the need to bring out unique provenance, physical and other details for each copy. Occasionally, duplicate copies will share the same bibliographic record, with individual holdings records.

Recording holdings information: The same procedures for recording holdings apply as for general collections.

  • For serials, see: https://libcgi.syr.edu/cataloging/wiki/index.php/Issues
  • For multi-part monographs, see: https://libcgi.syr.edu/cataloging/wiki/index.php/MFHD#HOLDINGS_RECORDS_FOR_CONTINUATIONS_.26_MULTI-VOLUME_SETS

 

SHELF LIST AND FLAG CREATION

Currently there are macros to aid in the production of shelflist cards and book flags.Shelf lists are created locally at time of cataloging. Shelf list cards will contain: Call number, Author, Title, Publisher name, date, and Catalog ID number. Specific 590 fields may be added to provide information about a specific copy. Flags are created locally at time of cataloging.

 

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note

  • Purchased from Charles A. Dana Foundation funds
  • Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art.
  • Purchased from funds from Library Associates
  • Purchased from George Arents fund
  • Purchased from Marie Little Bird Fund
  • Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund
  • Purchased from Sol Feinstone Library Fund.
  • Purchased from Alonzo Flack Library Endowment Fund
  • Purchased from Petty Fund
  • Purchased from Phi Beta Kappa Endowment Fund.
  • Purchased from Edward A. Smith and Sheridan Gilmore Smith Memorial Library Fund.
  • Purchased from William P. Tolley Endowed Library Fund.
  • Purchased from Memorial Library Fund.


Add other funds as necessary to complete the list.

 

==SCRC call numbers== Draft, rev. 24o05


Curator input: Occasionally suggest call numbers (for example using folk literature instead of folklore call number for a literary journal).


Determine preferred call number from among several possibilities, e.g., press, author, illustrator.


Fine Press items—use Z239 + Cutter for press + year + workmark for title.

(Note: Z239 has been discontinued by LC)

Z239.1 Australia

Z239.2 England

Z239.3 France

Z239.4 Germany

Z239.5 Italy

Z239.6 Wales


Literary authors—generally use author number for all works, regardless of subject matter, to group them together. (Oates is a prime example, with the added wrinkle of using Cutter Sanborn derived 2nd Cutter for items she wrote, but using LC derived 2nd Cutter for titles edited by or contributed to.)


Illustrators as per established list: class in NC975 using designated sub-system for person. Foreign illustrators as per Janet Shahan’s list.


Children's literature: General guidelines

  • Do not use PZ classification.
  • Use literary author numbers when these have been established for an author (see 053 in name authority records).
  • Use literary author numbers for authors with established author numbers in SCRC collections.
  • Create local literary author number for works of fiction by authors lacking them; add number to name authority record.
  • If the illustrator has an established illustrator number (NC975) and is deemed the primary contributor, base call number on the illustrator.
  • Use subject-based call numbers for non-fiction works by authors not falling into categories above.

 

Other situations:

US cartoonists: NC1429

Albert Schweitzer: everything by under CT1098.S41 …

Everything about under CT1098.S411

M. Bourke-White: TR650.B77 …

B. Spock: RJ61.S64 …

PanAm 103: everything under LD5237.7 1988 [Cutter for main entry] [date]

Peace (pamphlets, sermons, lectures, moral and ethical aspects): use JX1963

    • LC has discontinued this call numbers; items in SCRC clustered here.

Call numbers for copies

Call number are used to differentiate between copies. The local practice is to add information after the year to explain the difference. Examples:

Publishers. If books with the same call number have different publishers add the first three letters of the publishers name after the year.

Provenance - It books have a different provenance, add the first three letters of the source name after the call number.

Item records, flags, processing

ITEM RECORDS

  • Creating the item record for single-volume monographs
    • Set item preferences:
      • Select Non-circulating item type (for all materials, whether monograph, periodical, serial).
      • Select In Process status
    • Scan the barcode in. The barcodes will be printed on the book's flag.
    • Save item record to the database.
  • For books with accompanying materials (in a pocket, etc.):
    • Revise the item record piece count to reflect the total number of pieces.
      • Eg., Book with 4 microfiches = 5 Pieces
    • If Conservation moves inserts to an envelope, they will return items to cataloguing to edit original item record and create a 2nd for the envelope.
  • Multi-volume monographic sets:
    • Create an item record for each volume.
    • Enter the appropriate enumeration and/or chronology:
      • One level of numbering: Enum. = v.1
      • Multiple levels of numbering: Enum. = v.1 pt.3
      • Non-numeric volume designations, such as * , ** [etc.]: Use Enum. = v.1, v.2 [etc.]
  • Serials and periodicals:

SHELF LIST CARDS AND FLAGS

In 2008, it was agreed that shelflist cards would no longer be produced for newly-catalogued titles. At the time the sweep of the LC shelflist began, the decision was made to disaggregate the card shelflist and discard cards as SUMMIT records were verfied and/or retrospective conversion completed.

Cards for books not on the shelves will be retained and searched again. After a year of looking, the title will be declared lost and withdrawn.

Book flags will be created for all monographs and bound serial volumes. Book flags need not be created for unbound periodical issues. If an item requires a flag for identification and shelving, one may be created. Item records will not be created for any unbound issues.

590 fields are added to provide information about a specific copy

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note

Purchased from Charles A. Dana Foundation funds

Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art.

Purchased from funds from Library Associates

Purchased from George Arents fund

Purchased from Marie Little Bird Fund

Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund

Purchased from Sol Feinstone Library Fund.

Purchased from Alonzo Flack Library Endowment Fund

Purchased from Petty Fund

Purchased from Phi Beta Kappa Endowment Fund.

Purchased from Edward A. Smith and Sheridan Gilmore Smith Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from William P. Tolley Endowed Library Fund.

Purchased from Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from Eric W. Lawson Family Endowment for New York State Documentary Heritage

Gift of Marc S. Seigle in memory of Vincent "Ted" D'Amato.

Gift notes:

Gift of Clare and Arnold Kivelson.

Gift of Gary and Mary McDowell.

Gift of Norman Keim.

Gift of David Tatham and Cleota Reed.

Gift of David H. Stam.

Gift of Robert and Virginia Dewey.

Gift of Mary Jane Woodward.

Gift of Luise and Morton Kaish.

From the Library of Earl Browder.

From the library of Michael Aikey.

Gift of Ray Thompson.

Provenance: John S. Mayfield (donor).

Gift of Anthony Tollin.

Gift of Albert and Helen Fowler from the Approach Archives.

Manuscript note template:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript collection ...

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for a portion of the manuscript collection ...

Plastics collection notes

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for several manuscript, archival, and artifact collections in the history of plastic.

On deposit from the National Plastics Center.

Citation notes

  • For Mickenberg (used for children's literature): and Rideout (Radical novel in U.S.)
    • Tales for little rebels : a collection of radical children's literature / edited by Julia L. Mickenberg ... 2008. $c p. ...
    • Learning from the left : children's literature, the Cold War, and radical politics in the United States / Julia L. Mickenberg. 2005. $c p. ...
  • For Rideout (Radical novel in U.S.)
    • The radical novel in the United States 1900-1954 / Walter B. Rideout. ‡c p. 293.
  • For Richmond (Shaker Coll.)
    • Richmond, M.L.H. Shaker lit., $c 482

Call numbers

Curator input: Curators may propose call numbers (for example using folk literature instead of folklore call number for a literary journal).

Preferred call numbers may derive from the press, the author, the illustrator, or some other aspect that makes the book of interest to SCRC.

Fine Press items

For US-based presses, use Z239 + Cutter for press + year + workmark for title. Search SUMMIT to see if a press number has been established prior to 2009.

Publisher list:

  • Ontario Review Press: Z239.O58

(Note: Z239 has been discontinued by LC)

Z239.1 Australia

Z239.2 England

Z239.3 France

Z239.4 Germany

Z239.5 Italy

Z239.6 Wales

Literary authors

Generally use author's literary number for all works, regardless of subject matter, to keep all works together.

  • Joyce Carol Oates:
    • Use PS3565.A8 + Cutter Sanborn-derived 2nd Cutter for the title for works written by her
    • Use PS3565.A81 + LC-derived 2nd Cutter for the main entry for anthologies to which she contributed.
    • Always add 590 note: The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript collection of Joyce Carol Oates.

Illustrators

as per established list: class in NC975 using designated sub-system for person. Foreign illustrators as per Janet Shahan’s list.

Other situations

US cartoonists: NC1429

  • Use 2 Cutter numbers: 1st for the cartoonist, 2nd for the title.

Albert Schweitzer: everything by under CT1098.S41 …

Everything about under CT1098.S411

M. Bourke-White: TR650.B77 …

B. Spock: RJ61.S64 …

PanAm 103: everything under LD5237.7 1988 [Cutter for main entry] [date]

Call numbers for copies

Call number are used to differentiate between copies. The local practice is to add information after the year to explain the difference.

Examples:

Publishers. If books with the same call number have different publishers add the first three

letters of the publishers name after the year.

Provenance - It books have a different provenance, add the first three letters of the source name after the call number.

THESAURI FOR RARE BOOKS

Binding terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor.

Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Type evidence : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Provenance evidence : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / ‡c Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section.Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Printing and publishing evidence : thesauri for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / ‡c Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Paper terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Genre terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

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