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Downloadable list of Fall 2019 courses available to first year and transfer students PDF 284KB

Some VPA programs include the option to “choose” a studio or academic elective on your first semester to complete your schedule. You can also find this list under Resources on page 1 of the FTES form. The instructions for your major will refer to this list, so it is important to locate it and have it open when you’re completing your FTES form. We recommend that you read it ahead of time and decide which courses interest you the most.

Available academic elective courses are on pages 1-14, and studio elective courses are on page 15. The information you provide will assist advisors in building your fall schedule. Every effort will be made to place you in your choice of electives as long as there are available seats and no scheduling conflicts with required courses.

Hello and welcome to our favorite part of the summer: course selections!
A

s you will automatically be placed in your required courses, this is your opportunity to pick something fun, challenging and/or previously unknown to you.

If you need an academic elective, you can choose from a wide selection of courses from the College of Arts and Sciences; for example a language, math, natural science, humanities or social science. If a placement exam is required, there will be a notice at the top. There will also be a few courses offered by the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

If you need a studio elective, you can choose from the list of options on page 16. Not every major within VPA needs a studio, please review your FTES page to see what your requirements are as space is limited.


We will do our best to enroll you in your first choice for electives. However, due to available seats and scheduling conflicts, as your required courses take precedence, that might not happen. You will have between 7 and 9 more semesters at Syracuse University, so you will have future opportunities.

Below is a guide for how you input your course selections:


We wish you a wonderful summer and look forward to meeting you in August!

Choose from the following list of classes to complete the FTES section for Academic Electives

College of Arts and Sciences Based Classes

The following are courses found in the College of Arts and Sciences.

The list below contains Language courses, which require a Placement Exam before selecting.

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

ARB

101

Arabic I   (4)   Proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Arabic. Students cannot enroll in ARB 101 after earning credit for ARB 102, 201 or ARB 202 or higher.

ARB

201

Arabic III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course, which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Arabic.  Students cannot enroll in ARB 201 after earning credit for ARB 202 or higher.

CHI

101

Chinese I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing.  Students cannot enroll in CHI 101 after earning credit for CHI 102, CHI 201, or CHI 202 or higher.

CHI

201

Chinese III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese.  Students cannot enroll in CHI 201 after earning credit for CHI 202 or higher.

FRE

102

French II   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. 

Students cannot enroll in FRE 102 after earning credit for FRE 201, FRE 202 or higher.

FRE

201

French III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French.  Students cannot enroll in FRE 201 after earning credit for FRE 202 or higher.

FRE

202

French IV (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading,      discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and       interpretation of meaning. Conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 202     after earning credit for a course higher than FRE 202.

GER

101

German I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in German. No prior experience or admission by placement testing.  Students cannot enroll in GER 101 after earning credit for GER 102, GER 201, or GER 202 or higher.

GER

201

German III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in German.  Students cannot enroll in GER 201 after earning credit for GER 202 or higher.

GRE

101

Ancient Greek I   (4) Introductory course which prepares students to acquire a reading knowledge of Classical Attic Greek, focusing on morphology and syntax, and its role in the culture and literature of ancient Greek society. No prior experience or admission by placement testing.  Students cannot enroll in GRE 101 after earning credit for GRE 102, GRE 201, or GRE 202 or higher.

HEB

101

Hebrew I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hebrew. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in HEB 101 after earning credit for HEB 102, HEB 201, or HEB 202 or higher.

HEB

201

Hebrew III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hebrew.  Students cannot enroll in HEB 201 after earning credit for HEB 202 or higher.

HIN

101

Hindi/Urdu I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu.  Students cannot enroll in HIN101 after earning credit for HIN 102, HIN 201, or HIN 202 or higher.

HIN

201

Hindi/Urdu III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu.

Students cannot enroll in HIN 201 after earning credit for HIN 202 or higher.

ITA

101

Italian I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in ITA 101 after earning credit for ITA 102, ITA 201, or ITA 202 or higher.

ITA

102

Italian II     (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian. Students cannot enroll in ITA 102 after earning credit for ITA 201, ITA 202 or higher.

ITA

201

Italian III     (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian.  Students cannot enroll in ITA 201 after earning credit for ITA 202 or higher.

ITA

202

Italian IV (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Italian.

Students cannot enroll in ITA 202 after earning credit for a course higher than ITA 202.

JPS

101

Japanese I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in JPS 101 after earning credit for JPS102, JPS 201, or JPS 202 or higher.  

JPS

201

Japanese III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese.  Students cannot enroll in JPS 201 after earning credit for JPS 202 or higher.

KOR

101

Korean I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 101 after earning credit for KOR 102, KOR 201, KOR 202, or higher.

KOR

201

Korean III  (4)  Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts.  Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 201 after earning credit for KOR 202 or higher.

LAT

101

Latin I   (4) Introductory course which prepares students to acquire a reading knowledge of classical Latin, focusing on morphology and syntax, and its role in the culture and literature of ancient Roman society.  Students cannot enroll in LAT 101 after earning credit for LAT 102, LAT 201, or LAT 202 or higher.

LAT

102

Latin II (4) Continuing course with emphasis on morphology and syntax. Introduction to examples of unsimplified Latin prose of the Republic and Empire, read and interpreted within the cultural context of Greco-Roman society. Students cannot enroll in LAT 102 after earning credit for LAT 201, LAT 202, or higher.

POR

101

Portuguese I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts.  Activities are conducted in Portuguese.  No prior experience or adamission by placement testing.  Students cannot enroll in POR 101 after successfully completing POR 102, 201, or  202 or higher.

POR

201

Portuguese III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Portuguese.

Students cannot enroll in POR 201 after earning credit for POR 202 or higher.

RUS

101

Russian I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Russian. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in RUS 101 after earning credit for RUS102, RUS 201, or RUS 202 or higher.

RUS

201

Russian III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Russian. Students cannot enroll in RUS 201 after earning credit for RUS 202 or higher.

SPA

101

Spanish I   (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in SPA 101 after earning credit for SPA 102, SPA 201, or SPA 202 or higher.

SPA

102

Spanish II   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 102 after earning credit for SPA 201, SPA 202 or higher.

SPA

201

Spanish III   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 201 after earning credit for SPA 202 or higher.

SPA

202

Spanish IV   (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 202 after earning credit for a course higher than SPA 202.  

TRK

101

Turkish I   (4)   Proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Turkish. Students cannot enroll in TRK 101 after earning credit for TRK 102, TRK 201, or TRK 202 or higher.

Math Based Academic Courses

The list below contains Math courses, which require a Placement Exam before selecting. 

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

MAT

121

Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I   (4) First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Topics include displaying data, numerical measures of data, elementary probability, discrete distributions, normal distributions, confidence intervals. NOTE: A student cannot receive credit for MAT 121 after completing STT 101 or any MAT course numbered above 180 with a grade of C or better.

MAT

183

Elements of Modern Mathematics (4) Linear equations, matrices, and linear programming. Introduction to mathematics of finance. Discrete probability theory. For students interested in management, finance, economics, or related areas.

MAT

194

Precalculus   (4)   Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Analytical trigonometry and trigonometric functions. A student cannot receive credit for MAT 194 after receiving a grade of C or better in any calculus course. Credit cannot be given for both MAT 193 and MAT 194.

MAT

221

Elementary Probability and Statistics I   (3)   First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.

MAT

285

Life Sciences Calculus I   (3) Functions and their graphs, derivatives and their applications, differentiation techniques, the exponential and logarithm functions, multivariable differential calculus including constrained optimization. MAT 285 may not be taken for credit after successful completion of MAT 284 or MAT 295.  Prereq: Must have a C- or better in MAT 194 or equivalent.

MAT

286

Life Sciences Calculus II (3) Antidifferentiation; the definite integral and applications; first order differential equations with applications. Cannot be taken for credit after successfully completing MAT 296.

MAT

295

Calculus I   (4) Analytic geometry, limits, derivatives, maxima-minima, related rates, graphs, differentials, exponential and logarithmic functions, mean-value theorem, integration. For science majors. MAT 295 may not be taken for credit after successful completion of MAT 286.  Prereq: C- or better in MAT 194 or equivalent.   

MAT

296

Calculus II (2-4) Integration: the definite integral and applications; trigonometric functions, methods of integration, improper integrals, infinite series, elementary differential equations, parametric equations, polar coordinates.

Natural Science Based Academic Courses

The list below contains Natural Science courses. No placement exam is necessary. 

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

AST

101

Our Corner of the Universe   (4) Historical and modern understanding of the nature of the solar system. Includes laboratory with observations. May be taken with AST 104 in either order or independently.  

BIO

106

Ocean Life (3) If you enroll in a discussion group, it will auto enroll you in the lecture: This is an introduction to the biology of the diverse organisms that live in the ocean, applications of cutting edge technology to their study, recent scientific discoveries, and the science behind current global conservation issues.

BIO

121

General Biology I   (4) First course in a survey of biological concepts ranging from the molecular level to global ecology.  Units include the nature of science, life chemistry, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, and evolution.

CHE

103

Chemistry in the Modern World (3) Basic concepts and principles of chemistry. Applications of chemistry to problems in the modern world. Will not satisfy prerequisite requirements for advanced courses in chemistry. (First in a sequence, to be followed by CHE 113.)

CHE

106

General Chemistry Lecture (3) Fundamental principles and laws underlying chemical action, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, and introductory thermochemistry.  Credit is given for CHE 106 or 109 or CHE 150 but not more than one of these.   

CHE

107

General Chemistry Laboratory   (1) Experimental study of basic principles and techniques of chemistry. States of matter, determination of formulas and molecular weights, simple volumetric and gravimetric analysis, heats of reaction. Equilibrium, rates of reactions, and qualitative analysis. Credit is given for CHE 107 or 129 or CHE 151 but not more than one of these.

CSD

212

Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (3)   Application of biology, physics, anatomy, physiology, and cognitive psychology to processes of speech, language, and hearing.  Nature of disruptions to normal communication and scientific principles of prevention, diagnosis, and remediation. Cannot receive credit for both CSD 212 and CSD 303.

EAR

104

Earth Science Lab (1) Co-Requisite Laboratory component for EAR 105. Must be enrolled in 105 to enroll in 104.

EAR

105

Earth Science   (3) Scientific study of our planet, its history, and the processes that shape it and affect humans.  Emphasis includes tectonics, continental surfaces, and climate.  Lecture and recitation, no laboratory; no prerequisite.  Intended for non-majors.  Students may receive credit for either EAR 101 or 105 but not both.

EAR

111

Climate Change Past and Present (3) Introduction to the science of climate change from the geological record of the last century. Major drivers of global climate, measuring change, and forecasting future climate. Role of human activities in present climate.

EAR

117

Oceanography (3) A comprehensive introduction to the geology, physics, chemistry, and biology of the world ocean and its impact on global climate and environmental concerns.

EAR

205

Water and Our Environment (3) Investigates origin, occurrence, chemistry and hydrology of water on earth. Includes climate change, contamination and water supply issues within context of water sustainability.

EAR

225

Volcanoes and Earthquakes (3) Examination of the geologic nature of volcanoes and earthquakes as they are related to plate tectonic activity in the Earth. Discussion of related societal hazards.

GEO

155

The Natural Environment (3) Patterns of the physical phenomena at and near the surface of the earth. Surface configuration, climate, vegetation, and soil and their areal interrelationships.

PHY

101

Major Concepts of Physics I   (4) Explores the fundamental laws which govern the universe with emphasis on the concept of energy as a unifying principle.  No science prerequisites.  Knowledge of elementary algebra required.  Includes Laboratory.

PHY

211

General Physics I   (3) First half of a two semester introduction to classical physics including mechanics and thermal physics. Uses calculus. Knowledge of plane trigonometry required. Coreq: PHY 221, MAT 285, or MAT 295.

PHY

212

General Physics II (3) Second half of a two semester introduction to classical physics including electricity, magnetism and light.

PHY

221

General Physics Laboratory I   (1)  Techniques of laboratory work: treatment of random errors, graphical representation of data. Experimental demonstration of principles of mechanics, thermodynamics, and waves (of vector forces, conservation of momentum and energy, thermal properties of gases). Coreq: PHY 211 or PHY 215.

PHY

222

General Physics Laboratory II (1) Experimental study of principles of electromagnetism and their application in electrical circuits. Use of electronic instruments, such as the oscilloscope.

PHY

250

Physics Journal Workshop (1) Introduction to physics research by reading and critical discussion of articles from the current or recent physics literature. For physics majors and minors; others may enroll with permission of instructor.

PHY

312

Relativity and Cosmology: Einstein and Beyond (3) Introduces Einstein’s special and general relativity.  Understanding E=mc2, curved space-time, higher dimensions, and the Big Bang.

SCI

104

Science-Questions and Quests: Physical Phenomena I (3) Science for non-science majors seeking to explain curious events through laboratory experiences and study of motion, gravity, machines, energy, and properties of matter.

Humanities Based Academic Courses

The list below contains Humanities based academic courses.

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

AAS

138

Writing About Black Culture (3) Expository writing based on cogent analysis of African American literature, art, music, and history ideas.

AAS

231

African American Literature to 1900: An Introduction (3) African American literature and folklore from colonial days to 1900.  Autobiographies, fiction, and poetry, including works by Wheatley, Douglass, Jacobs, Brown, Webb, Hopkins, Dunbar, Chesnutt, Dubois, Johnson, Washington.

ENG

105

Introduction to Creative Writing (3)This course is designed to introduce the student to three types of creative writing: poetry, fiction and mixed literary forms, and the craft and skills needed to write effectively in each.

ENG

107

Living Writers   (3) Introduction to visiting writers and their work. Lectures and small group sections emphasize dynamic and plastic nature of writing. Opportunity to question the authors directly on content, influences, and technique.

ENG

114

Survey of British Literature 1789 to Present (3) British literature since 1789.

ENG

119

Topics in U.S. Literature (3) United States literary and cultural texts studied in the context of American history, culture, and politics. Readings may be focused by historical periods or thematic issues.

ENG

121

Introduction to Shakespeare (3) Selected plays of Shakespeare read in conjunction with performances on video and CD-ROM.

ENG

122

Introduction to the Novel (3) Critical study of the history and development of the novel as literary form. Selected British, American, and postcolonial novels from the 18th century to the present.

ENG

145

Reading Popular Culture (3) Semiotic analysis of American culture and its artifacts. Topics of analysis may include consumerism, advertising, film, music, TV, video, language, gender/race/class, mythic characters, cultural outlaws, virtual culture.

ENG

151

Interpretation of Poetry (3) Critical study of poetry from various historical periods. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

153

Interpretation of Fiction (3) Critical study of fiction from more than one historical period. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

154

Interpretation of Film (3) Critical study of film from various historical periods. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

155

Interpretation of Nonfiction (3) Critical study of nonfiction from more than one historical period and geographic locale. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

156

Interpretation of Games (3) This course will explore the evolving form of digital games, tracing their historical roots in traditional board games and other associated cultural modes of play to current and possible future iterations of video games. We will employ a range of critical approaches to gaming; games will be “read” and critically interrogated as texts, and the relationships between game, player, design, software, interface, and structures of play will be discussed.

ENG

174

World Literature, Beginnings to 1000 (3) Readings from classics of antiquity and the first millennium, including Gilgamesh, The Iliad, Ramayana, the Bible, Chinese and Japanese literature, the Qur’an, and

1001 Nights. Texts are explored in historical context, both past and present.

ENG

181

Class and Literary Texts   (3)   Construction and representation of "class," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG

182

Race and Literary Texts (3) Construction and representation of "race," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG

184

Ethnicity and Literary Texts (3) Ethnicity in literary and theoretical texts. Emphasizing conceptual paradigms, social issues, and aesthetic considerations in the practice of reading texts from ethnically differentiated literary traditions.

ENG

192

Gender and Literary Texts (3) Construction and representation of "gender," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

HOA

105

Arts & Ideas I   (3) Visual arts in relation to broader cultural, historical, and intellectual contexts. HOA 105 surveys the ancient world to the High Renaissance. HOA 106 proceeds from the late Renaissance to the present. Either course may be taken first or independently.

HOM

125

Intro to Music Theory (3) Elementary harmony, form and counterpoint through writing and listening. For non-majors and music theatre majors only.

HOM

165

Understanding Music I   (3) The art of music. Development of musical styles in the West from ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.

JSP

114

The Bible in History, Culture and Religion (3) Jewish and Christian scriptures in their ancient Near Eastern and Hellenistic contexts, with particular attention to their literary forms, the history of their composition, and their role in the development of Western religions and cultures. Credit is not given for REL/JSP 114 and either REL/JSP 215 or REL 217.

JSP

135

Judaism (3) Survey of Judaic ideas, values, and cultural expressions as found in biblical, Talmudic, medieval, mystical, and modern texts.

LIN

201

The Nature and Study of Language   (3) Introduction to the study of human language. Language change and diversity, usage, meaning, phonetics, grammatical description, and language learning.

LIN

251

English Words (3) An analysis of English words, their structure, history, meaning, and formation from a theoretically informed linguistic perspective. The course is primarily concerned with the words borrowed from the classical languages.

LIT

101

Intro Classic Literature (3) Major popular and influential genres of classical literature. Heroic tradition in epic and tragic spirit of epic and drama. Birth of comedy.

LIT

131

Great Jewish Writers (3) Introduction to fiction by Jewish authors. Topics include modernization, rebellion against authority, alienation, childhood, superstition, and the holocaust. Some films included.

LIT

200

Military Tales of Russia (3)

LIT

226

Dostoevsky and Tolstoy   (3)   Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports on Dostoevsky's and Tolstoy's major novels.

PHI

107

Theories of Knowledge and Reality   (3) An introduction to some major questions about knowledge and reality, such as the existence of God, the mind-body problem, free will and the nature and limits of knowledge. Historical and contemporary readings.

PHI

171

Critical Thinking (3) Presentation and evaluation of reasoning, including arguments, explanations, and the justification of decisions. Topics of current social and ethical interest will serve as examples, with one topic selected for extended study.

PHI

175

Social & Political Philosophy (3) Classical and contemporary readings on basic topics in social and political philosophy; political obligation and authority, justice and basic rights, liberty and equality, the justification of democracy.  

PHI

191

Ethics and Contemporary Issues (3) Ethical reflection on some basic moral quandaries of daily life. Ideas of Plato, Aristotle, Kant applied to topics such as self-respect and decency in a technological world, abortion, honesty, friendship, moral courage, self-respect.

PHI

192

Introduction to Moral Theory (3) Major philosophical theories about moral rightness, virtue, and the good life, such as utilitarian, Kantian, and Aristotelian theories.  Historical and contemporary sources. 

Credit cannot be received for both PHI 192 and PHI 209.

PHI

197

Human Nature   (3) Philosophical theories of human nature, their underlying metaphysical claims, and their ethical consequences.

PHI

251

Logic (3) Logic as a formal language, as a component of natural language, and as a basis of a programming language. Varieties of logical systems and techniques. Syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

REL

102

Religion Today in a Globalizing World (3) Religion is on the rise and at the same time changing rapidly in our globalizing world.  From New York to Singapore, newspapers that once headlined “The Death of God” now report on a new religious fervor among well-educated people.  New religious movements appear; new leaders emerge within established traditions and call for change.  Some worldwide fundamentalist movements espouse violence but many engage in important social service work as part of an emerging global civil society.  Technology, especially the worldwide web, replaces print as the primary form of religious communication.  New immigrants from Asia, Europe and America bring an unexpected religious pluralism to formerly Judeo-Christian populations. The modern lines between religion and politics are challenged everywhere. How can we understand this new world?

REL

108

Religion and its Critics (3) With religion, modernity reached its breaking point.  By the 19th century, religion was under critique.  Friedrich Nietzsche announced that God was dead.  Karl Marx called religion the opium of the people.  Sigmund Freud diagnosed religion as the universal obsessional neurosis of humanity.  This course investigates these critics of religion and their lasting legacies in our world.  We will pay particular attention to contemporary media as modes of religious critique.   

REL

131

Great Jewish Writers (3) A wide-angle panorama of great stories written by Jewish authors, including

Kohelet, S. Y. Abramovitsh, Sholem Aleichem, I. L. Peretz, Franz Kafka, S. Y. Agnon, Elie Wiesel, and Yiddish women writers. Topics include ancient biblical wisdom, shtetl life, superstition, modernization, alienation, rebellion against authority, radical textualism, love, marriage, and the Nazi genocide. Our literary approach to works in the Jewish literary tradition emphasizes interconnections between theme and rhetoric. Immersion in texts, a particular tendency in traditional Jewish circles, sometimes appears as an escape from Jews’ powerlessness in the outside world. The strategy has limitations.

REL 131 is on the list of approved courses used to fulfill the Writing Intensive requirement (requirement for Illustration majors).

REL

135

Judaism (3) The course provides a broad (but selective) survey of Jewish religious thought and practice from the biblical period through the modern. Readings focus on the way diverse Jewish thinkers have reshaped Jewish identity by reconfiguring the way in which they understand ritual life. We pay particular attention to how Jewish interpreters have constructed a changing textual tradition as an integral part of that process. This class introduces students to the Hebrew Bible, Talmud and Midrash, medieval philosophy and mysticism, and to German Jewish existentialism and American Jewish feminism in the 20th century. Special note is paid to the modern period and the role of women.

REL

142

Native American Religion (3) In this class we will learn about the religious life of Native Americans as it is revealed through the contact between various European and Indigenous cultural groups throughout the Americas by emphasizing the distinctive meanings of land. Readings focus on Mesoamerican (Aztec and Maya), Lakota (i.e., Sioux), and Haudenosaunee (i.e., Iroquois).

REL

156

Christianity   (3) Christianity's institutional forms, sacred writings, ideas and beliefs, worship practices, cultural and creative expressions, ethical and political roles in society, from antiquity to the present.

How Christianity addresses human needs, concerns, and desires.

REL

165

Discovering Islam   (3)   Islam as a faith and a civilization. Understanding its origins, beliefs, rituals, and the historical development of its intellectual traditions in the pre-modern and modern eras, and its geographic, cultural and theological diversity today.

REL

185

Hinduism (3) This course introduces Hindu traditions and practices.  Our strategy is to move between cosmological, theological and philosophical understandings, and the ways these motivate ordinary and extraordinary human lives.  We see these understandings expressed through myth and moral teachings, storytelling and poetry, ritual and devotion.  Thus our syllabus materials include some classic texts and teachings of ancient Indian civilization and more recent poetry, tales and ethnographic descriptions.  Throughout the course we remain interested in contemporary Indian society where Hinduism's many streams of thought have ongoing significance.

REL

186

Buddhism (3) This course introduces the history, traditions, and practices of Buddhism from its origins in South Asia roughly 2,500 years ago to the present. We will also explore current social and ethical issues around Buddhism.

REL

191

Religion, Meaning and Knowledge   (3)    Exploration of the age-old quest for meaning, knowledge and faith in the face of suffering and loss through art, philosophy, music and literature.  

REL

246

Religion & Popular Culture (3) Popular expression of religion in and through cemeteries, holidays, music, film, media and sports.

WGS

101

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies   (3) Gender as a critical inquiry relating to race, class, and sexuality.

WGS

240

Topic: Popular Culture (3) Why is popular culture so important, prompting us to have such intense relationships to it that we either can’t look away or fear paying attention at all? In this course we will

 

 

look at the ways that gender is created, mediated, maintained and policed through popular culture. We will look at the role of celebrity, music/musicians, film, television, the news, gossip, the internet, and advertising.

WGS

240

Topic: Hip-Hop Feminisms  (3) This course links feminism, rap music, and hip-hop culture. Taking current controversies and hip hop’s dominant presence as a global youth culture into consideration, we will use feminism, rap music and hip hop culture as a springboards into pressing social, cultural and political issues such as sexism, misogyny, ableism, homophobia, racism, classism, and heterosexism.

WRT

114

Writing Culture   (3) Nonacademic writing; creative nonfiction, memoir, the essay.  Students write texts experimenting with style, genre, and subject, read contemporary nonfiction texts by varied authors, and attend lectures/reading of visiting writers.

WRT

255

Advanced Argumentative Writing (3) Intensive practice in the analysis and writing of advanced arguments for a variety of settings: public writing, professional writing, and organizational writing.

Social Science Based Academic Courses

The list below contains Social Science based academic courses.

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

AAS

112

Introduction to African American Studies in Social Sciences (3) Historical and sociopolitical materials. Approa ches to studying the African American experience, antecedents from African past, and special problems.

ANT

111

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology   (3) Economics, politics, religion, symbolism, rites of passage, developmental cycle, and expressive culture. Required for Anthropology majors.

ANT

121

Peoples and Cultures of the World  (3) Case studies of global cultural diversity. Exploration of daily life, rites of passage, marriage, family, work, politics, social life, religion, ritual, and art among foraging, agricultural, and industrial societies.

ANT

141

Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory (3) Survey of the prehistoric past spanning the origins of humankind through the rise of complex societies. Class activities and field trips provide a hands-on introduction to archaeological interpretation.

ANT

185

Global Encounters (3) Predominant views of reality and values in the cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Humanistic study of cultures and nature of cross-cultural understanding.

ECN

101

Principles of Microeconomics (3) Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics.

ECN

102

Principles of Macroeconomics (3) Introduction to concepts and methods of economic analysis. Emphasis on such macroeconomic topics as gross domestic product, unemployment, money, and theory of national income.

ECN

203

Economic Ideas and Issues   (3)   Foundation of modern Western economic thought. The model economists have built on this foundation as applied to current issues facing individuals and society.

Credit is given for either ECN 203 or ECN 101, 102 or ECN 109.

GEO

103

Environment and Society   (3)     Relationship between society and the environment. Natural resource use, climate change politics, food and agriculture, energy, water, and sustainability.

GEO

105

World Urban Geography (3) Survey of world, urban geography. Major concepts of human geography for non-specialists.

GEO

171

Human Geographies   (3) An integrative overview to human geography.  Topics include humanenvironmental relations, demographic change, cultural landscape, urban and agricultural land use and economic restructuring.

GEO

215

Global Env Change (3) Focusing on physical processes and patterns of environmental change, changes occurring as a result of human activities, and the social consequences of environmental change.

GEO

272

World Cultures   (3)   The globalization of culture and the persistence of local cultures around the world. Case studies from different regions of the world examine geographical processes that shape ways of life.

HST

208

The Middle East since the Rise of Islam (3) An introductory survey of Middle East History beginning with the rise of Islam. Includes culture, social life, women and politics, early Arab Empires, the Ottomans and Safavids, intellectual renaissance.

HST

213

Africa: Ancient Times to 1800 (3) This course is a survey of African history from ancient times to1800. It focuses on political, social, economic, and environmental history of the continent. Themes include, but are not limited to state formation, technology, production, trade, religion, migration, labor, slave trade, and biological exchanges between Africa and other continents

HST

222

History of American Sexuality (3) Examines sexuality in America from the colonial period to the present, exploring how American views of sex and desire have changed over time.

LLA

201

Elements of Law (3) Provides an introduction to law and legal institutions. The course is designed to prepare lower-division undergraduates for the further study of legal topics in departments across the

College of Arts and Sciences.

MAX

123

Critical Issues for the United States    (3) Interdisciplinary focus on critical issues facing America. Perspectives of social science disciplines on the meaning of the American Dream, its past and its future.

PSC

121

American National Government and Politics   (3) American political institutions. Basic principles embedded in structure and practices of American government. Practical consequences of this political system for the citizen. Credit is given for PSC 121 or PSC 129, but not both.  

PSC

123

Comparative Government and Politics   (3)   Comparison of selected governmental institutions, individual and collective political actors, and issues across the industrialized and developing world.

Particular attention to dynamics of socioeconomic and political change.

PSC

124

International Relations   (3) Foreign policy, decision making, comparative foreign policy,

international transactions, and the international system. Credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.

PSC

125

Political Theory (3) Introduction to theories of major modern political philosophers (Locke, Rousseau, Hume, J.S. Mill, Marx). Contemporary theories of liberty, justice, and equality.

PSC

139

International Relations (3) Foreign policy, decision making, comparative foreign policy, international transactions, and the international system. Credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.

PST

101

An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy (3) Develop research and problem solving skills to create government policies that address current social and economic problems facing the United States. Students study policy problems of their choice.

PST

110

Public Service Practicum (1) Students investigate the societal issues affecting members of the Syracuse community by completing a 35 hour community service requirement, attending 4 class meetings to reflect on their experiences, and completing weekly journals and two paper assignments.

Must be taken in addition to other academic electives.

PSY

205

Foundations of Human Behavior   (3) Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self-understanding.

QSX

111

Queer Histories, Communities, and Politics   (3)   Explores and analyzes lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender histories, communities, and politics from the ancient past to the contemporary, global present through an interdisciplinary reading of research, theory, memoir, biography, fiction, and documentary film.  

SOC

101

Introduction to Sociology   (3) Principal concepts, methods, and findings in sociology. Societal structures, processes, institutions, and social roles from both macro- and microanalytic human behavior perspectives.

SOC

102

Social Problems   (3) Application of sociological theory and methods to identification, description, and analysis of contemporary social problems. Critique and analysis of alternative strategies for social change.

SOC

248

Ethnic Inequalities and Intergroup Relations (3) Identification of individuals and groups by self and others as members of ethnic categories. Consequences of ethnic identifications for individual, group, and societal interaction. Emphasizing ethnic inequalities, group interactions, social movements and change, racism, prejudice, and discrimination.   

SOC

281

Sociology of Families (3)   Families and their connections to other social and economic institutions. Diversity of family forms and experiences. Formation and dissolution of relationships. Trends and changes.  

College of Visual and Performing Arts Based Academic Courses

The following are elective courses found in the College of Visual and Performing Arts

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

AIC

340

Visiting Artist Lecture Series (1) Contemporary artists and art educators with significant national and international exhibition and publishing records talk about their work and its development, including arthistorical and other inter-disciplinary connections. Must be taken in addition to other electives.

ART

250

Filmmaking: Cinematic Modes – Imaginative Independent Cinema (3) Topics will focus around codes and forms that work at the mainstream and borders of cinematic production. Note: this class meets at night. Students must attend one cinematheques each week (Thursdays 7-9pm).

ART

250

Literature & Film: The Pleasures of Adaptation (3) Recognize the interplay between literary works and cinema. Analyze possible meanings of intertextual echoing. Develop strong interpretation skills.

Students must attend one cinematheques each week (Tuesdays 7-9pm).

AIC

300

Cosplay (3) Learn about cosplay culture! The AIC prefix will focus on writing about cosplay culture.

DES

300

Design Visualization Management (3) For designers, entrepreneurs, or anyone who might find themselves hiring or working with designers in the future. Learn about the most influential historic strategies, formulate plans to maintain the integrity of new design programs, and produce standards documentation and manuals for a variety of design strategies from small boutique start-ups to established corporations.

DRA

115

Intro to Theater (3) Lecture, reading, and discussion of basic principles of play analysis and mise-enscène. Application of principles to selected dramatic texts.

ILL

255

History of Illustration (3) The history of American illustration since the mid-1800s to present. Impact on and reflection of American history in both cultural and visual forms.

Choose from the following list of classes to complete the FTES

Section for Studio Electives

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

APH

267

Introduction to Art Photography (3) This introductory class explores the ways contemporary artists use analog black and white photography as an approach to describing, critiquing or meditating on modern life.  Students learn to use analog cameras, develop film and make gelatin silver prints to create their own original work.

ARI

132

Drawing through the Figure (3) The objectives of this drawing course are to perceive and understand the human figure in terms of proportion, structure, motion, surface and volumes. 

ARI

200

Intro to Studio Arts (3) Learn how to think and express yourself in different media, such as drawing, painting, sculpture and other forms. Get a broad experience making art. 

ARI

221

Ceramics Hand-Building (3) Introduces and familiarizes the student with basic methods of preparing and forming clay using pinch, coil and slab construction techniques. Includes basic methods of decorating, glazing and firing ceramic objects. Explores sculptural and functional art works. 

ARI

223

Ceramics Wheel-Throwing (3) Introduction to the potter's wheel as a tool for creating form and surface with clay. Introduction to contemporary and historical artworks that make use of the wheel.

ARI

225

Ceramics Slip-Casting (3) Introduction to 3D forms using mold-making and slip-casting techniques, art and industrial design histories in ceramics that make use of the casting method, glazing and other surface treatments of the slip-cast object.

ARI

231

Drawing Observation (3) The focus of this course is to learn to see and allow the experience to develop into drawing.

ARI

243

Intro to Jewelry and Metals (3)  Fundamental techniques and visual design problems as introduction to working with metal, cutting, soldering, forging, finishing, and other surface treatments. 

ARI

281

Sculpture Methods I (3) Introduction to the basic techniques and concepts of the sculpture making process. The course will investigate the materials and methods that serve as the foundation for creating sculptural form including fabrication, carving, and casting techniques. 

ARI

300

Etching and Relief (3) Students will experiment with developing technical printmaking techniques and their contemporary applications. Course content is addressed via hands-on research projects, discussions and a series of visiting artists. 

ARI

300

Cosplay (3) Make your own cosplay costumes and learn about cosplay culture! No experience necessary. All students are welcome. Culminates in a cosplay content! The ARI prefix will focus on making costumes.

CAR

131

 Introduction to Multimedia (3) The fundamentals for making art with computers in consideration of time and interactivity. The fundamentals of using programming and software applications for multimedia and the internet. 

DRA

105

Intro to Acting for Non-Majors (3) Basic group exercises and improvisations in vocal and physical relaxation, concentration, and dramatic action.

VID

211

Video Sketchbook (3) A medium for perceptual and conceptual development. Most work done exclusively with camcorders. Editing equipment and instruction is available for projects requiring post production.