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Downloadable list of Fall 2020 courses available to first-year and transfer students [PDF]

Downloadable list of Fall 2020 courses [Word Doc]


To access the list, you can download the PDF below. You can also find this list on page 1 of your FTES form under the blue tab on the right-hand side titled “Resources.” Instructions on how to complete the form are also found below the “Courses Available to First Year Students” link. It is important to locate it and have it open when you are completing your form. We recommend that you read it ahead of time and decide which courses interest you the most


The information you provide will assist advisors in building your fall schedule. Every effort will be made to place you in your choice of electives. However, due to available seats and scheduling conflicts, as your required courses take precedence, that might not happen.


Hello and welcome to our favorite part of the summer: course selections!

As you will automatically be placed in your required courses, this is your opportunity to pick something fun, challenging or previously unknown to you.

If you need an academic elective, you can choose from a wide selection of courses from the College of Arts and Sciences; for example a language (pages 3-6), math (page 7), natural science (pages 8-9), humanities (pages 10-14) or social science (page 15-17). If a placement exam is required, there will be a notice at the top. There will also be a few courses offered by the School of Education (page 18) and the College of Visual and Performing Arts (page 19).

We will do our best to enroll you in your first choice for electives. However, due to available seats and scheduling conflicts, as your required courses take precedence, that might not happen. You will have between 7 and 9 more semesters at Syracuse University, so you will have future opportunities.

Below is a guide for how you input your course selections:

We wish you a wonderful summer and look forward to meeting you in August!

Office of Academic and Career Advising
Carol, Vicki, Andrea, Ben, Hannah, Jackie, Julia, Meggy and Patti

 

Choose from the following list of classes to complete the FTES section for ACADEMIC ELECTIVES
The following are courses found in the College of Arts and Sciences.


The list below contains Language courses, which require a Placement Exam before selecting.

Prefix

Course #

Course Description

ARB

101

Arabic I (4) Proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Arabic. Students cannot enroll in ARB 101 after earning credit for ARB 102, ARB 201, or ARB 202 or higher.

ARB

201

Arabic III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course, which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Arabic. Students cannot enroll in ARB 201 after earning credit for ARB 202 or higher.

CHI

101

Chinese I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in CHI 101 after earning credit for CHI 102, CHI 201, CHI 202 or higher.

CHI

201

Chinese III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Chinese. Students cannot enroll in CHI 201 after earning credit for CHI 202 or higher.

FRE

102

French II (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 102 after earning credit for FRE 201, FRE 202, or higher.

FRE

201

French III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 201 after earning credit for FRE 202 or higher.

FRE

202

French IV (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in French. Students cannot enroll in FRE 202 after earning credit for a course higher than FRE 202.

FRE

101

French I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in French. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in FRE 101 after earning credit for FRE 102, FRE 201, FRE 202, or higher.

GER

101

German I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in German. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in GER 101 after earning credit for GER 102, GER 201, GER 202, or higher.

GER

201

German III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in German. Students cannot enroll in GER 201 after earning credit for GER 202 or higher.

GRE

101

Ancient Greek I (4) Introductory course which prepares students to acquire a reading knowledge of Classical Attic Greek, focusing on morphology and syntax, and its role in the culture and literature of ancient Greek society. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in GRE 101 after earning credit for GRE 102, GRE 201, GRE 202, or higher.

HEB

101

Hebrew I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hebrew. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in HEB 101 after earning credit for HEB 102, HEB 201, HEB 202, or higher.

HEB

201

Hebrew III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hebrew. Students cannot enroll in HEB 201 after earning credit for  HEB 202 or higher.

HIN

101

Hindi/Urdu I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu. Students cannot enroll in HIN/SAS 101 after earning credit for HIN/SAS 102, HIN/SAS 201, HIN/SAS 202, or higher.

HIN

201

Hindi/Urdu III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Hindi/Urdu. Students cannot enroll in HIN/SAS 201 after earning credit for HIN/SAS 202 or higher.

ITA

101

Italian I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in ITA 101 after earning credit for ITA 102, ITA 201, ITA 202, or higher.

ITA

102

Italian II (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian. Students cannot enroll in ITA 102 after earning credit for ITA 201, ITA 202, or higher.

ITA

201

Italian III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Italian. Students cannot enroll in ITA 201 after earning credit for ITA 202 or higher.

ITA

202

Italian IV (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Italian. Students cannot enroll in ITA 202 after earning credit for a course higher than ITA 202.

JPS

101

Japanese I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in JPS 101 after earning credit for JPS 102, JPS 201, JPS 202, or higher.

JPS

201

Japanese III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Japanese. Students cannot enroll in JPS 201 after earning credit for JPS 202 or higher.

KOR

101

Korean I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 101 after earning credit for KOR 102, KOR 201, KOR 202, or higher.

KOR

201

Korean III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Korean. Students cannot enroll in KOR 201 after earning credit for KOR 202 or higher.

LAT

101

Latin I (4) Introductory course which prepares students to acquire a reading knowledge of classical Latin, focusing on morphology and syntax, and its role in the culture and literature of ancient Roman society. Students cannot enroll in LAT 101 after earning credit for LAT 102, LAT 201, LAT 202, or higher.

POR

101

Portuguese I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Portuguese. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in POR 101 after successfully completing POR 102, 201, or 202 or higher.

POR

201

Portuguese III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Portuguese. Students cannot enroll in POR 201 after earning credit for POR 202 or higher.

RUS

101

Russian I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Russian. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in RUS 101 after earning credit for RUS 102, RUS 201, RUS 202, or higher.

RUS

201

Russian III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Russian. Students cannot enroll in RUS 201 after earning credit for RUS 202 or higher.

SPA

101

Spanish I (4) Introductory proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. No prior experience or admission by placement testing. Students cannot enroll in SPA 101 after earning credit for SPA 102, SPA 201, SPA 202, or higher.

SPA

102

Spanish II (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which develops communicative abilities in speaking, listening, reading, and writing in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 102 after earning credit for SPA 201, SPA 202, or higher.

SPA

201

Spanish III (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which refines and expands previously acquired linguistic skills in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 201 after earning credit for SPA 202 or higher.

SPA

202

Spanish IV (4) Continuing proficiency-based course which focuses on reading, discussing, and analyzing authentic texts as a basis for the expression and interpretation of meaning. Conducted in Spanish. Students cannot enroll in SPA 202 after earning credit for a course higher than SPA 202.

TRK

101

Turkish I (4) Proficiency-based course which prepares students to understand, speak, read, and write in culturally authentic contexts. Activities are conducted in Turkish. Students cannot enroll in TRK 101 after earning credit for TRK 102, TRK 201, TRK 202, or higher.


The list below contains Math courses, which require a Placement Exam before selecting.

Prefix

Course #

Course Description

MAT

121

Probability and Statistics for the Liberal Arts I (4) First in a two-course sequence. Teaches probability and statistics by focusing on data and reasoning. Topics include displaying data, numerical measures of data, elementary probability, discrete distributions, normal distributions, confidence intervals. NOTE: A student cannot receive credit for MAT 121 after completing STT 101 or any MAT course numbered above 180 with a grade of C or better.

MAT

183

Elements of Modern Mathematics (4) Linear equations, matrices, and linear programming. Introduction to mathematics of finance. Discrete probability theory. For students interested in management, finance, economics, or related areas.

MAT

194

Precalculus (4) Polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Analytical trigonometry and trigonometric functions. A student cannot receive credit for MAT 194 after receiving a grade of C or better in any calculus course. Credit cannot be given for both MAT 193 and MAT 194.

MAT

221

Elementary Probability and Statistics I (4) First of a two-course sequence. For students in fields that emphasize quantitative methods. Probability, design of experiments, sampling theory, introduction of computers for data management, evaluation of models, and estimation of parameters.

MAT

285

Life Sciences Calculus I (3) Functions and their graphs, derivatives and their applications, differentiation techniques, the exponential and logarithm functions, multivariable differential calculus including constrained optimization. MAT 285 may not be taken for credit after successful completion of MAT 284 or MAT 295.

MAT

286

Life Sciences Calculus II (3) Antidifferentiation; the definite integral and applications; first order differential equations with applications. Cannot be taken for credit after successfully completing MAT 296.

MAT

295

Calculus I (4) Analytic geometry, limits, derivatives, maxima-minima, related rates, graphs, differentials, exponential and logarithmic functions, mean-value theorem, L'Hospital's rule, integration. For science majors. MAT 295 may not be taken for credit after successful completion of MAT 286.

MAT

296

Calculus II (4) Integration: the definite integral and applications; trigonometric functions, methods of integration, improper integrals, infinite series, elementary differential equations, parametric equations, polar coordinates.


The list below contains Natural Science courses. No placement exam is necessary.

Prefix

Course #

Course Description

AST

101

Our Corner of the Universe (4) Historical and modern understanding of the nature of the solar system. Includes laboratory with observations. May be taken with AST 104 in either order or independently.

BIO

105

Technology Inspired by Nature-Learning from the Natural World (3) Investigations into how human technology has been and can be inspired by nature. Research process; production of novel adhesives, building materials, fabrics; solar power, biofuels, aerodynamics, computer design, artificial intelligence, and robotics.

BIO

121

General Biology I (4) First course in a survey of biological concepts ranging from the molecular level to global ecology. Units include the nature of science, life chemistry, cell structure and function, photosynthesis and respiration, genetics, and evolution.

CHE

103

Chemistry in the Modern World (3) Basic concepts and principles of chemistry. Applications of chemistry to problems in the modern world. Will not satisfy prerequisite requirements for advanced courses in chemistry. (First in a sequence, to be followed by CHE 113.)

CHE

106

General Chemistry Lecture I (3) Fundamental principles and laws underlying  chemical action, states of matter, atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, properties of solutions, chemical equilibria, and introductory thermochemistry. Credit is given for CHE 106 or 109 or CHE 150 but not more than one of these.

CHE

107

General Chemistry Laboratory I (1) Experimental study of basic principles and techniques of chemistry. States of matter, determination of formulas and molecular weights, simple volumetric and gravimetric analysis, heats of reaction. Equilibrium, rates of reactions, and qualitative analysis. Credit is given for CHE 107 or 129 or CHE 151 but not more than one of these.

CSD

212

Introduction to Communication Sciences and Disorders (3) Application of biology, physics, anatomy, physiology, and cognitive psychology to processes of speech, language, and hearing.  Nature of disruptions to normal communication and scientific principles of prevention, diagnosis, and remediation. Cannot receive credit for both CSD 212 and CSD 303.

EAR

104

Earth Science  Lab (1) Co-Requisite Laboratory component for EAR 105. Must be enrolled in 105 to enroll in 104.

EAR

105

Earth Science (3) Scientific study of our planet, its history, and the processes that shape it and affect humans. Emphasis includes tectonics, continental surfaces, and climate. Lecture and recitation, no laboratory; no prerequisite. Intended for non-majors. Students may receive credit for either EAR 110 (formerly EAR 101) or 105 but not both.

EAR

117

Oceanography (3) A comprehensive introduction to the geology, physics, chemistry, and biology of the world ocean and its impact on global climate and environmental concerns.

EAR

205

Water and Our Environment (3) Investigates origin, occurrence, chemistry and hydrology of water on earth. Includes climate change, contamination and water supply issues within context of water sustainability.

EAR

225

Volcanoes and Earthquakes (3) Examination of the geologic nature of volcanoes and earthquakes as they are related to plate tectonic activity in the Earth. Discussion of related societal hazards.

EAR

111

Climate Change Past and Present (3) Introduction to the science of climate change from the geological record of the last century. Major drivers of global climate, measuring change, and forecasting future climate. Role of human activities in present climate.

GEO

155

The Natural Environment (3) Patterns of the physical phenomena at and near the surface of the earth. Surface configuration, climate, vegetation, and soil and their areal interrelationships.

PHY

101

Major Concepts of Physics I (4) Explores the fundamental laws which govern the universe with emphasis on the concept of energy as a unifying principle. No science prerequisites. Knowledge of elementary algebra required. Includes Laboratory.

PHY

211

General Physics I (3) First half of a two semester introduction to classical physics including mechanics and thermal physics. Uses calculus. Knowledge of plane trigonometry required.

PHY

212

General Physics II (3) Second half of a two semester introduction to classical physics including electricity, magnetism and light.

PHY

221

General Physics Laboratory I   (1) Techniques of laboratory work:  treatment of random errors, graphical representation of data. Experimental demonstration of principles of mechanics,
thermodynamics, and waves (of vector forces, conservation of momentum and energy, thermal properties of gases).

PHY

222

General Physics Laboratory II (1) Experimental study of principles of electromagnetism and their application in electrical circuits. Use of electronic instruments, such as the oscilloscope.

SCI

104

Science-Questions and Quests: Physical Phenomena I (3) Science for non-science majors seeking to explain curious events through laboratory experiences and study of motion, gravity, machines, energy, and properties of matter.


The list below contains Humanities based academic courses

Prefix

Course #

Course Description

AAS

138

Writing About Black Culture (3) Expository writing based on cogent analysis of African American literature, art, music, and history ideas.

AAS

231

African American Literature to 1900: An Introduction (3) African American literature and folklore from colonial days to 1900. Autobiographies, fiction, and poetry, including works by Wheatley, Douglass, Jacobs, Brown, Webb, Hopkins, Dunbar, Chesnutt, Dubois, Johnson, Washington.

ANT/NAT/REL

244

Indigenous Religions (3) This course explores a long neglected aspect of the world's religions--Indigenous religions--that is, religions that are primarily defined as culturally-oriented toward particular landscapes. 

ENG

105

Introduction to Creative Writing (3)This course is designed to introduce the student to three types of creative writing: poetry, fiction and mixed literary forms, and the craft and skills needed to write effectively in each.

ENG

107

Living Writers (3) Introduction to visiting writers and their work. Lectures and small group sections emphasize dynamic and plastic nature of writing. Opportunity to question the authors directly on content, influences, and technique.

ENG

114

British Literature, 1789 to Present (3) British literature since 1789.

ENG

117

American Literature, Beginnings to 1865 (3) American writing before 1865, mainly from the English-speaking colonies and the United States.

ENG

119

Topics in U.S. Literature (3) This lecture course offers a survey of U.S. fiction written from the late 1940s to the early 2000s. We will interpret the fiction through a sociohistorical lens, and place particular emphasis on investigating the interconnections between literary form and social change. After an initial survey of fiction written in direct response to World War II and its aftermath, we will read texts associated with or influenced by the counterculture, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights, Black Power and Black Arts Movements, Second Wave Feminism, the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act, and late twentieth-century U.S. consumerism.

ENG

121

Introduction to Shakespeare (3) Selected plays of Shakespeare read in conjunction with performances on video.

ENG

122

Introduction to the Novel (3) Critical study of the history and development of the novel as literary form. Selected British, American, and postcolonial novels from the 18th century to the present.

ENG

145

Reading Popular Culture (3) Semiotic analysis of American culture and its artifacts. Topics of analysis may include consumerism, advertising, film, music, TV, video, language, gender/race/class, mythic characters, cultural outlaws, virtual culture.

ENG

151

Interpretation of Poetry (3) Critical study of poetry from various historical periods. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

153

Interpretation of Fiction (3) Critical study of fiction from more than one historical period. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

154

Interpretation of Film (3)Critical study of film from various historical periods. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

155

Interpretation of Nonfiction (3) Critical study of nonfiction from more than one historical period and geographic locale. Formal, theoretical, and interpretive issues.

ENG

156

Interpretation of Games (3)This course will explore the evolving form of digital games, tracing their historical roots in traditional board games and other associated cultural modes of play to current and possible future iterations of video games. We will employ a range of critical approaches to gaming; games will be “read” and critically interrogated as texts, and the relationships between game, player, design, software, interface, and structures of play will be discussed.

ENG

174

World Literature, Beginnings to 1000 (3) Readings from classics of antiquity and the first millennium, including Gilgamesh, The Iliad, Ramayana, the Bible, Chinese and Japanese literature, the Quran, and 1001 Nights. Texts are explored in historical context, both past and present.

ENG

181

Class and Literary Texts (3) Construction and representation of "class," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG

182

Race and Literary Texts (3) Construction and representation of "race," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG

184

Ethnicity and Literary Texts (3) Ethnicity in literary and theoretical texts. Emphasizing conceptual paradigms, social issues, and aesthetic considerations in the practice of reading texts from ethnically differentiated literary traditions.

ENG

192

Gender and Literary Texts (3) Construction and representation of "gender," especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG

200

Selected Topics: Science Fiction (3) The origins and definition of Science Fiction or speculative fiction are debated by fans and scholars all over the world. Likewise, scholars continue to debate the value of the genre as Literature with a capital L. In this course, we will take the genre and its capacities for profound social commentary seriously as we explore possible beginnings, movements, subgenres and shifts within Science Fiction short stories and novels, as well as some television and film. We will look primarily at U.S. American and British texts, but we will expand beyond the West somewhat. This course features time in our library’s Special Collections and opportunities for creative work, as well as critical reading and writing.

HOA

105

Arts and Ideas I (3) Visual arts in relation to broader cultural, histor-ical, and intellectual contexts. HOA 105 surveys the ancient world to the High Renaissance. HOA 106 proceeds from the late Renaissance to the present. Either course may be taken first or independently.

HOM

125

Intro to Music Theory (3) Elementary harmony, form and counterpoint through writing and listening. For non-majors and music theatre majors only.

HOM

165

Understanding Music I (3) Introduction to the art of music. Development of musical styles in the West from ancient Greece through the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Assumes no prior musical knowledge.

HOM

172

American Popular Music  (3) The history of American popular music from the 19th century to more recent developments.

JSP/REL

114

The Bible in History, Culture and Literature(3)The Bible is among the world’s most widely-read literature and has influenced art, literature, law and politics as well as religious traditions. This survey of Jewish and Christian scriptures pays particular attention to the function of the Torah, the Gospels, and the Bible as ancient and modern scriptures, as well as their literary contents, their composition, and their role in the development of Western religions and cultures. 

JSP/REL

135

Judaism (3) The course provides a broad (but selective) survey of Jewish religious thought and practice from the biblical period through the modern. Readings focus on the way diverse Jewish thinkers have reshaped Jewish identity by reconfiguring the way in which they understand ritual life. We pay particular attention to how Jewish interpreters have constructed a changing textual tradition as an integral part of that process. This class introduces students to the Hebrew Bible, Talmud and Midrash, medieval philosophy and mysticism, and to German Jewish existentialism and American Jewish feminism in the 20th century. Special note is paid to the modern period and the role of women.

LIN

201

The Nature and Study of Language (3) Introduction to the study of human language. Language change and diversity, usage, meaning, phonetics,  grammatical description, and language learning.

LIN

251

English Words (3) An analysis of English words, their structure, history, meaning, and formation from a theoretically informed linguistic perspective. The course is primarily concerned with the words borrowed from the classical languages.

LIT

200

Military Tales of Russia (3)

LIT

200

Masterpieces of Italian Literature (3)

LIT

211

Greek and Roman Drama in English Translation (3) Selected works of the Greek and Roman dramatists. No knowledge of Greek or Latin required.

LIT

226

Dostoevsky and Tolstoy (3) Lectures, readings, discussions, and reports on Dostoevsky's and Tolstoy's major novels.

MES/REL/SAS

165

Discovering Islam (3) Islam as a faith and a civilization.  Understanding its origins, beliefs, rituals, and the historical development of its intellectual traditions in the pre-modern and modern eras, and its geographic, cultural and theological diversity today.

PHI

107

Theories of Knowledge and Reality (3) An introduction to some major questions about knowledge and reality, such as the existence of God, the mind-body problem, free will and the nature and limits of knowledge. Historical and contemporary readings.

PHI

109

Theories of Knowledge and Reality (3) An introduction to some major questions about knowledge and reality, such as the existence of God, the mind-body problem, free will and the nature and limits of knowledge. Historical and contemporary readings.

PHI

125

Political Theory (3) Introduction to theories of major modern political philosophers (Locke, Rousseau, Hume, J.S. Mill, Marx). Contemporary theories of liberty, justice, and equality.

PHI

171

Critical Thinking (3) Presentation and evaluation of reasoning, including arguments, explanations, and the justification of decisions. Topics of current social and ethical interest will serve as examples, with one topic selected for extended study.

PHI

175

Introduction to Social and Political Philosophy (3) Classical and contemporary readings on basic topics in social and political philosophy; political obligation and authority, justice and basic rights, liberty and equality, the justification of democracy.

PHI

192

Introduction to Moral Theory (3) Major philosophical theories about moral rightness, virtue, and the good life, such as utilitarian, Kantian, and Aristotelian theories. Historical and contemporary sources. Credit cannot be received for both PHI 192 and PHI 209.

PHI

197

Human Nature (3) Philosophical theories of human nature, their underlying metaphysical claims, and their ethical consequences.

PHI

251

Logic (3) Logic as a formal language, as a component of natural language, and as a basis of a programming language. Varieties of logical systems and techniques. Syntax, semantics and pragmatics.

REL

156

Christianity (3) This course covers Christianity’s institutional forms, sacred writings, ideas and beliefs, worship practices, cultural and creative expressions, and ethical and political roles in society, from antiquity to the present.  In covering these things, this course basically asks what Christianity has to do with being human.  That is, how does Christianity address human needs, concerns, and desires?  What are some of the problems that Christianity has caused believers and non-believers?  And, why, in spite of its problems, does it remain appealing and viable to a broad array of people over centuries and across cultures? 

REL

191

Religion, Meaning & Knowledge (3) This course explores the age-old quest for meaning, knowledge and faith in the face of suffering and loss through art, philosophy, music and literature.

WGS

101

Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies (3) Introduces the interdisciplinary field of women's and gender studies; gender as a social construct shaped by race, class, sexuality, disability, and nation; and feminist theories of oppression, power, and resistance.

WGS

240

Topic: Gendering Social Justice  (3) Will examine intersecting inequalities within social justice movements, including: women’s rights / feminist movement, climate change, resource privatization, workers rights, indigenous rights, disability rights, LGBTQ/nonbinary struggles. 

WRT

114

Writing Culture (3) Nonacademic writing; creative nonfiction, memoir, the essay. Students write texts experimenting with style, genre, and subject; read contemporary nonfiction texts by varied authors; attend lectures/readings of visiting writers.

WRT

115

Writing, Rhetoric, and the Environment (3) Rhetorical study and practice of critical, research-based writing in response to environmental issues and their material and discursive contexts. Emphasizes audience and genre-awareness to produce persuasive, culturally situated interventions in environmental debates.

The list below contains Social Science based academic courses.

Prefix

Course #

Course Description

AAS

112

Introduction to African American Studies (3) Historical and sociopolitical materials. Approaches to studying the African American experience, antecedents from African past, and special problems.

ANT

111

Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (3) Economics, politics, religion, symbolism, rites of passage, developmental cycle, and expressive culture. Required for Anthropology majors.

ANT

121

Peoples and Cultures of the World (3) Case studies of global cultural diversity. Exploration of daily life, rites of passage, marriage, family, work, politics, social life, religion, ritual, and art among foraging, agricultural, and industrial societies.

ANT

141

Introduction to Archaeology and Prehistory (3) Survey of the prehistoric past spanning the origins of humankind through the rise of complex societies. Class activities and field trips provide a hands on introduction to archaeological interpretation.

ANT

185

Global Encounters (3) Predominant views of reality and values in the cultures of Asia, Africa, and the Americas. Humanistic study of cultures and nature of cross-cultural understanding.

ECN

101

Principles of Microeconomics (3) Consumer demand, theory of production, markets and prices, social welfare, and related topics.

ECN

102

Principles of Macroeconomics (3) Introduction to concepts and methods of economic analysis. Emphasis on such macroeconomic topics as gross domestic product, unemployment, money, and theory of national income.

GEO

103

Environment and Society (3) Relationship between society and the environment. Natural resource use, climate change politics, food and agriculture, energy, water, and sustainability.

GEO

105

World Urban Geography (3) Survey of world, urban geography. Major concepts of human geography for non-specialists.

GEO

171

Human Geographies (3) An integrative overview to human geography. Topics include human-environmental relations, demographic change, cultural landscape; urban and agricultural land use and economic restructuring.

GEO

215

Global Env Change (3) Focusing on physical processes and patterns of environmental change, changes occurring as a result of human activities, and the social consequences of environmental change.

GEO

272

World Cultures (3) The globalization of culture and the persistence of local cultures around the world. Case studies from different regions of the world examine geographical processes that shape ways of life.

LLA

201

Elements of Law (3) Provides an introduction to law and legal institutions. The course is designed to prepare lower-division undergraduates for the further study of legal topics in departments across the College of Arts and Sciences.

MAX

123

Critical Issues for the United States (3) Interdisciplinary focus on critical issues facing America. Perspectives of social science disciplines on the meaning of the American Dream, its past and its future.

NAT

105

Introduction to Native American Studies (3) Overview of critical issues in Native American Studies: colonization, religious freedom, environment, sovereignty, and politics of identity, interdisciplinary, comparative, and indigenous perspectives in relation to histories, societies, and cultures.

PSC

121

American National Government and Politics (3) American political institutions. Basic principles embedded in structure and practices of American government. Practical consequences of this political system for the citizen. Credit is given for PSC 121 or PSC 129, but not both.

PSC

123

Comparative Government and Politics (3) Comparison of selected governmental institutions, individual and collective political actors, and issues across the industrialized and developing world. Particular attention to dynamics of socioeconomic and political change.

PSC

124

International Relations (3) Foreign policy, decision making, comparative foreign policy, international transactions, and the international system. Credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.

PSC

125

Political Theory (3) Introduction to theories of major modern political philosophers (Locke, Rousseau, Hume, J.S. Mill, Marx). Contemporary theories of liberty, justice, and equality.

PSC

139

International Relations (3) Foreign policy, decision making, comparative foreign policy, international transactions, and the international system. Credit is given for PSC 124 or PSC 139, but not both.

PST

101

An Introduction to the Analysis of Public Policy (3) Develop research and problem solving skills to create government policies that address current social and economic problems facing the United States. Students study policy problems of their choice.

PST

110

Public Service Practicum (1) Students investigate the societal issues affecting members of the Syracuse community by completing a 35 hour community service requirement, attending 4 class meetings to reflect on their experiences, and completing weekly journals and two paper assignments.

PSY

205

Foundations of Human Behavior (3) Fundamental principles of mental life and human behavior. Significance of psychology in human relationships and self- understanding.

PSY

274

Social Psychology (3) Introduction to scientific study of the social behavior of individuals; experimental approach. Social influence, conformity, social perception, attitude changes, small groups, and collective behavior. PREREQ: PSY 205 OR PSY 209

QSX

111

Queer Histories, Communities, and Politics (3) Explores and analyzes lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender histories, communities, and politics from the ancient past to the contemporary, global present through an interdisciplinary reading of research, theory, memoir, biography, fiction, and documentary film.

SOC

101

Introduction to Sociology (3) Principal concepts, methods, and findings in sociology. Societal structures, processes, institutions, and social roles from both macro- and microanalytic human behavior perspectives.

SOC

102

Social Problems (3) Application of sociological theory and methods to identification, description, and analysis of contemporary social problems. Critique and analysis of alternative strategies for social change.

SOC

248

Ethnic Inequalities and Intergroup Relations (3) Identification of individuals and groups by self and others as members of ethnic categories. Consequences of ethnic identifications for individual, group, and societal interaction. Emphasizing ethnic inequalities, group interactions, social movements and change, racism, prejudice, and discrimination.

SOC

281

Sociology of Families (3) Families and their connections to other social and economic institutions. Diversity of family forms and experiences. Formation and dissolution of relationships. Trends and changes.


The following are courses found in the School of Education.

 

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

CLS

105

College Learning Strategies (3) Study and application of learning strategies in the context of lectures, reading, recitations and independent learning situations.

EDU

203

Introduction to Inclusive Schooling (3) Examining schools and teaching from a disability studies perspective. Topics, issues, values related to inclusive education. Readings, observations and analysis of cultural media.

The following are elective courses found in the College of Visual and Performing Arts.

Prefix

Number

Course Title and Description

AIC

340

Visiting Artist Lecture Series (1) Contemporary artists and art educators with significant national and international exhibition and publishing records talk about their work and its development, including art-historical and other inter-disciplinary connections. Must be taken in addition to other electives.

AMC

110

Voice Class for Beginners (1) Non-Music majors only. Learn to sing. Group instruction. Must be taken in addition to other electives. Tell us on page 3 in the note section if you wish to take this course.

AMC

120

Piano Class for Beginners (1) Non-Music majors only. Learn to play the piano. Group instruction. Must be taken in addition to other electives. Tell us on page 3 in the note section if you wish to take this course.

AMC

160

Guitar Class for Beginners (1) Non-Music majors only. Learn to play the guitar. Group instruction. Must be taken in addition to other electives. Tell us on page 3 in the note section if you wish to take this course.

AMC

540

Opera Workshop (1) Audition Required.  Primarily for students in voice. Experience in conducting, coaching, accompanying, acting, directing, and stage management in the preparation and presentation of operas. Scenes from various operas and one full-length opera. Must be taken in addition to other electives. Tell us on page 3 in the note section if you wish to take this course.

ART

250

Filmmaking: Cinematic Modes – Imaginative Independent Cinema (3) Topics will focus around codes and forms that work at the mainstream and borders of cinematic production. Note: this class meets at night. Students must attend one cinematheques each week (Thursdays 7-9pm).

ART

250

Literature & Film: The Pleasures of Adaptation (3) Recognize the interplay between literary works and cinema. Analyze possible meanings of intertextual echoing. Develop strong interpretation skills. Students must attend one cinematheques each week (Tuesdays 7-9pm).

DRA

107

Introduction to the Theater for Non-Majors (3) Lecture, reading, and discussion of basic principles of play analysis and mise-en-scène. Application of principles to selected dramatic texts.

ILL

255

History of Illustration (3) The history of American illustration since the mid-1800s to present. Impact on and reflection of American history in both cultural and visual forms.

MTC

555

Jazz Improvisation (1) Beginning jazz theory; simple harmonic functions. Improvisation with Ionian, Dorian, and Mixolydian modes. Arranging for small ensembles.  Permission of instructor. Must be taken in addition to other electives. Tell us on page 3 in the note section if you wish to take this course.