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The following policies must be followed by students and faculty in the department. If you have any questions, please contact the department.

Table of Contents

 

Faculty and Instructor Policies

The policies below are not a full and exhaustive list of policies related to faculty and instructors. Faculty and instructors have rights and responsibilities as determined by the University in addition to those outlined in the Department of Design policies. For information on University-wide policies, please visit the Office of the Provost’s Faculty Manual: http://provost.syr.edu/faculty-support/faculty-manual/.

Academic Policies

Scheduled courses

Syllabus

All professors and instructors will create a syllabus for each class that is being taught. Syllabi must be submitted to the program coordinator by the end of the week before classes. These will then be submitted to the college for its records. Syllabi should be reviewed and approved by program coordinators. Instructors should provide a syllabus to students on the first day of classes.

Syllabi will require all University mandated sections, including, but not limited to: instructor name and office hours; meeting schedule for class; weekly calendar of assignments, projects, and lessons; any and all required textbooks, materials, and fieldtrips; measurable learning outcomes for the class; grading policy; and mandatory texts on academic integrity, disabilities, and religious observance. For more information on syllabus guidelines, visit the University Senate page: http://universitysenate.syr.edu/curricula/courses-proc/syllabus/. For more information on field trips, see the Field Trip section of this document.

Religious Observances Policy

Faculty must abide by the Religious Observances Policy:

SU religious observances policy, found at http://supolicies.syr.edu/emp_ben/religious_observance.htm, recognizes the diversity of faiths represented among the campus community and protects the rights of students, faculty, and staff to observe religious holidays according to their tradition. Under the policy, students are provided an opportunity to make up any examination, study, or work requirements that may be missed due to a religious observance provided they notify their instructors before the end of the second week of classes. For fall and spring semesters, an online notification process is available through MySlice > StudentServices > Enrollment > MyReligiousObservances from the first day of class until the end of the second week of class.

Registers/Records

All professors and instructors will keep weekly rosters for all scheduled contact sessions. It is their choice how these are kept; however, as a part of student records, they will need to be available for the full duration of study of that particular class year of students (3 to 5 years). It is suggested that an electronic spreadsheet would be an efficient way to keep the volume of record required (Please see absence policy).

Additionally, faculty should be reviewing their official class roster, available through Blackboard or through the MySlice Faculty Center, on a weekly basis. Faculty should ensure that students who are attending class are all listed on the roster, and that students who expressed an interest in dropping the class actually drop off the roster.

Students who are on the roster but do not attend

Students who are on the roster but do not attend the first two weeks of classes should be administratively dropped from the class. In order to do this, faculty should fill out an add/drop form and write at the top of the form “Administrative Drop.” These forms must be submitted at least one week before the financial drop deadline to ensure that the form can be processed before the financial drop deadline (see the academic calendar for the date, as it varies by semester). Instructors are responsible for emailing students who have not attended to state that the student will be administratively dropped from the class.

If a faculty member forgets to complete an administrative drop before the financial drop deadline, then the students will need to be given a grade of “NA” (for “never attended”). This option should ONLY be used if a student never attended.

Students who attended at first, but stopped

Students who attend the class at first, then stop attending, or who consistently show up late, risk failing a course. If a student stops attending or consistently shows up late, the instructor should speak to the student or send an email to explain the consequences of being late (see Absence Policy below). If the student is planning on dropping or withdrawing from the course, the instructor should sign off on paperwork at this time. If the situation does not improve and paperwork is not submitted for signature, the instructor should report the fact to his or her program coordinator.

Program coordinators should arrange a meeting with the student and instructor to discuss progress in the class (and, if relevant, in the major) and determine if the student can continue in the class, or if s/he should drop or withdraw.

Students who are attending but do not show up on the roster

If a student attends the class but is not showing up on the roster, the student must add the class to his or her schedule. If it is after the add deadline, students must complete an add/drop form. This should be completed before midsemester to ensure that students with Midsemester Progress Reports can have them filled out by the instructor.

Classroom Behavior

Guidelines exist surrounding classroom behavior, faculty and student rights and responsibilities, and management of classroom disruption. More detailed information is available in Appendix A, as well as through the Office of Academic Affairs.

Changes to Classes/Cancellations

A syllabus will be given to the students and posted on Blackboard on or before the first day of classes. This syllabus must provide an outline of the taught sessions and other activities including date, time, venue and content. This information will also include the date and time of all assessments, including project and paper due dates.

The primary assumption is that we are agreeing to provide a specific number of contact hours/sessions, and that any changes to this need to be explained and appropriate alternative arrangements put in place. ANY planned changes to this information must be provided with as much notice as possible to the program coordinator and the administration team: please copy them in to any correspondence with the class. The program coordinator must approve any activities that interfere with teaching (resulting in cancelled classes), including assisting with college or university recruitment.

If an unplanned faculty absence occurs, such as due to illness or personal emergency, the same policy applies. Please provide as much notice as possible and make alternative arrangements to make up for missed class time. Alternative arrangements might include a makeup session, longer office hours, etc.

Notification of Unplanned Absence for Faculty

If you are unable to attend to your duties or attend classes due to illness or other unexpected cause, please inform the program coordinator with the reason and the administration team with as much notice as possible so that classes can be covered or students informed. Cancelled classes are regularly the cause of student complaints; in many cases, these can be avoided by apologizing to students, providing reasonable explanations for the absence and providing alternative activities.

Absence Policy

Most courses in the Department of Design are not courses based on a textbook, but rather rely on information and techniques taught in class. Because semesters are only 14 weeks long, each absence constitutes missing a significant part of the class experience. Additionally, students are expected to recognize the importance of professional behavior and to show respect for faculty and their fellow students by arriving on time to class each week. Therefore, the following absence policies are in place.

Once a week classes:

  • Each absence drops a student’s grade one full grade for the semester (e.g. from a B- to a C-).
  • Three absences will automatically lead to a failing grade.
  • Tardiness: late less than 30 minutes drops ½ grade (e.g. from a B to a B-). Late more than 30 minutes but less than 1 hour drops 1 full grade (e.g. from a B to a C).
  • Faculty discretion used for obvious, necessary absences (documented illness, family tragedies, etc.)

Twice a week classes:

  • Each student has one “free” absence (for illness, family purpose, or other reason).
  • Each additional absence will drop a student’s grade one full grade for the semester (e.g. from a B- to a C-).
  • Tardiness: If you arrive within 30 minutes of the start of class, you are considered tardy. Three instances of tardiness constitute one absence. If you are late by more than 30 minutes, you are considered absent.
  • Faculty discretion used for absences after the one “free” absence (for illness, family tragedies, etc.).

Sometimes, students may have multiple absences beyond their control (for instance, for a medical condition). Students in those situations should discuss with their advisors. Students may want to request a grade of “incomplete” in order to have more time to make up the work. Alternatively, students may need to file a leave of absence.

Excused Absences:

A note about absences: sometimes, students will have required fieldtrips or other required activities that take place outside of class time. Instructors are responsible for making students aware of required activities taking place outside of class time (field trips that take place outside of class time should be determined by the major classes by the first week of classes and listed on syllabi so that students are aware of any conflicts). If the required activity conflicts with a class, the instructor assigning the activity should liaise with other faculty that are affected and provide means for students to contact their other instructors (e.g. an excuse form). All of this should take place during the first two weeks of the semester.

Grading Policy

The department policy has been compiled from the existing policies in each program.

Late work

In the design field, it is imperative that you complete your projects on time. It is expected that work is due on the dates specified. No late work is accepted.

Extenuating circumstances will be considered with appropriate documentation. Please note that backing up personal computers is a student responsibility, and that computer crashes are not acceptable reasons for incomplete or late work.

In the event that there are exceptional circumstances, a student can make a formal arrangement with the instructor to complete remaining work or assignments after the course ends. In order for an incomplete to be filed, enough work must have been completed by the student prior to filing for a grade to be assigned based on the work already turned in. Incompletes cannot be given for courses a student has registered for if the student files for a leave of absence or withdraws from the University. For more on filing a Request for Incomplete Grade, refer to the SU Course Catalog and request a form from the departmental office.

Moving forward in a program

Department of Design programs have a sequence in which courses must be completed. If a student fails a required class, the student generally will need to wait through one semester before retaking the course and continuing in the major. It is not possible for students to continue in some courses and not in others (for instance, if a communications design major fails CMD 251, s/he cannot continue in CMD 282, even if s/he passed CMD 281. Both CMD 251 and CMD 281 are pre-requisites for CMD 252 and CMD 282).

Additionally, if a student’s major grades average below C, they are placed on probation. If the student’s accumulated grades are below C during any subsequent semester, they are dropped from the program. Not only does this maintain equal standards for the department, it tells the student that, for whatever reason, they may be on the wrong path and helps to avoid more serious repercussions in the junior and senior year. It allows the student to find their passion in another program while still in a place to make that change. This policy also keeps the F off of their record and allows for a smoother transition to the next level.

Non-Scheduled Classes and Academic Activities

Independent Studies

In order to propose an independent study, a Proposal for Independent Study Form must be submitted. Forms are available on the registrar's website, and must be filled out completely before they are submitted for department chair signature.

Only up to 12 credits worth of independent studies AND experience credits combined can be counted toward a degree in VPA (per college rules).

Independent studies must follow these academic rules:

  • An independent study cannot be taken when the same or similar content is taught in a course that is offered that same semester.
  • An independent study cannot be substituted for a required course, and will only count for an elective course. Whether the independent study will count for academic or studio elective credit should be discussed with the faculty sponsor and written explicitly at the top of the form.
  • An independent study cannot repeat course topics that have been introduced or practiced in other required courses, unless the independent study represents a significant expansion of knowledge on previously covered topics.
  • An independent study must be as rigorous (if not more rigorous) when compared to a typical design course. However, an independent study does not need to meet for the same number of contact minutes as a regular scheduled class, as an independent study is not intended to mimic a class, but should be a student-driven experience.
  • An independent study form must be submitted no later than the first week of classes, and preferably before the start of classes. This is necessary to ensure that students meet their required course load and to allow necessary time for students to reconfigure their schedules should the independent study proposal be declined.
  • An independent study must not interfere with the instructors workload requirements in other classes.
  • Adjunct faculty cannot sponsor independent studies.
  • Teaching assistantships cannot be done for credit, regardless of whether or not an independent study form is completed.
  • Faculty must make sure the last four digits of the faculty sponsor SUID number are listed, as well as whether or not the class is for academic or studio credit.

Additionally, all independent study forms must abide by the following rules:

  • Faculty must complete the second half of the form. Faculty should complete this electronically so as to ensure adequate space for the procedures and information required by the form. If you need more space, please attach a second sheet. Forms with insufficient detail will result in the proposal being returned. Students should not be filling out this section, as it is a faculty responsibility to determine the amount of work to be completed and the criteria for assessing this work at the end of the semester.
  • The program coordinator of the program in which the independent study is being completed must sign off on the form below the "Dept. Chair Signature" line. If, for instance, a student is completing an independent study form in communications design, the program coordinator of communications design must sign off on the form before the chair will sign. This does not replace the department chair signature.
  • The advisor signature and faculty sponsor signature cannot normally be the same (please provide a rationale in this case). If a student's advisor and faculty sponsor are the same, then the program coordinator must sign off on the advisor line (as well as below the Dept. Chair Signature line as above).

Internships (Experience Credit)

An internship will have a minimum of one credit and a maximum of three credits. In all cases, a detailed rationale, description of the work to be undertaken and the assessment process will be provided for approval before the internship takes place. Internship proposals cannot be submitted after the internship begins. Credit will only be given during the semester that the work experience takes place. For instance, summer internships cannot receive credit in the fall or spring semester.

Internships that span more than one semester (e.g. fall and spring, summer and fall) must be requested as multiple internship proposals (e.g. one for the fall and one for the spring). For more detailed information and policies, as well as directions on approving internships, see Appendix B.

Internships will involve a work experience component, as well as an additional work or study component. They will also include some form of self-reflective component such as a journal where the student records and reflects on their learning. Additional program requirements and rules also apply (See Appendix B).

Only up to 12 credits worth of independent studies AND experience credits combined can be counted toward a degree in VPA (per college rules).

Field Trips/University Sponsored Travel

Syracuse University provides opportunities for student travel to activities that facilitate and/or enhance the learning process taking place within the University community. Whether the planned travel is mandatory or optional, all activities scheduled outside the University campus are subject to this policy. Participation in such activities shall be limited to members of the University community.

To assure that events or activities involving student travel are consistent with the University's mission and that student safety issues have been addressed, University sponsored student travel must be approved in advance by the program coordinator and the department chair. After approval has been given by both the program coordinator and the department chair, the following guidelines must be followed:

  1. A risk assessment will be completed by the faculty member who is coordinating the trip which must be signed off by the program coordinator and the chair at least 5 days before the trip.
  2. A pre-trip meeting must be held with all participants
    1. All participants must fill out travel forms at least three business days before the scheduled trip
    2. All participants must fill out the Off-Campus Travel Waiver and Assumption of Risk Form at least five business days before the scheduled trip
    3. Approved method of transportation must be booked

For more information on each of these requirements, as well as the full travel policy, see Appendix C.

Serving alcohol at events

Serving alcohol at college-sponsored events involves several issues related to the need for those serving alcohol to be covered by a liquor license and the fact that those attending the event may be under-age. Any and all events sponsored by the college, Department of Design, or by individual programs must abide by the policy.

Undergraduate Events

At events in which a large percentage of the attendees will be undergraduate students, alcohol may not be served.

Graduate Student or Faculty Events

While alcohol may be served at these events, several rules must be observed:

  1. To serve alcohol at an event, the event organizers must hire a vendor to serve the alcohol and that vendor must secure a liquor license from Onondaga County for that particular event. Vendors no longer have standing licenses to serve alcohol. In most cases, this means that event organizers must get a vendor to request a liquor license 15-30 days prior to the event.
  2. If the event is held on campus, organizers may hire University Food Services as the vendor. The same 15-30 day advance notice still applies.
  3. If the event is held off-campus, organizers may hire University Food Services to cater the event or some other vendor, but that vendor must secure a liquor license for the event. This should be confirmed prior to hiring the vendor.
  4. Under no circumstances may the organizers themselves purchase and serve alcohol. Liquor licenses are available only to approved vendors.
    1. Any University-owned property is considered “on-campus.” Any property leased or rented by a college entity is considered “off-campus.”

Communications

In accordance with Syracuse University policy, all faculty must check their syr.edu emails. Design faculty must reply to student emails within 48 hours. If you will not be available via email, you must post an out of office message.

Advising

Advising will be completed by full time faculty in a program. Program coordinators will coordinate and be responsible for quality and parity of the advising across the program. For the college’s minimal expectations for academic advising by faculty members, see Appendix D.

Class Scheduling

All courses must start at standard university start times, with NO EXCEPTIONS without approval from the Vice Chancellor’s office. Classes must meet for the required number of contact minutes, based on Senate and NASAD requirements. For a 3 credit class, an academic class meets for 150 minutes (equivalent to 1h20 twice a week or 50 min three times a week). For a studio class, meeting requirement is double (usually, 4h30 once a week or 2h30 twice a week. A 1 credit class meets 1/3 of the length of time; a 6 credit class meets 2x the length of time).

Class schedules should be as accurate as possible—when events are scheduled, staff look at space bookings for classes as they are posted to determine space availability. Also, in case of emergency, schedules should be accurate to allow for emergency personnel and services to help faculty and students. If classes will be moving or will be taught in multiple spaces, please let staff know.

In order for students to plan their schedules, and in an effort not to limit student class options, faculty must manage class time to match the advertised meeting length of the class. Classes should not start before or end after the listed start and end times.

Full Time Faculty should not be scheduled to teach between 12:30 and 2 on any weekday, as well as Friday mornings, so as to allow for committee meetings and other non-teaching duties.

Adjuncts/Part-Time Instructors

There are specific rules that apply to part-time faculty members due to Adjunct Union specifications. For more information, please contact the Adjunct Union or Betsy Henderson in the VPA Office of Academic Affairs. The rules below are liable to change based on new agreements between the Union and the University.

At present, any new section of a course that will be taught by an adjunct, or any section that will not be taught by the same adjunct as the previous year it was offered, must be searched. Searches will be posted online. Search committees will determine the best candidate based on the pool of applicants they receive. Adjuncts are evaluated yearly by their program coordinator, and must be completed on time for financial and academic affairs. Adjuncts will be asked to sign the evaluation and will have the option to append a letter disagreeing with the evaluation should they choose to do so. If there is any dissatisfaction with an adjunct faculty member’s performance, it should be noted on the evaluation.

Adjunct searches and hires are approved by Academic Affairs, the Dean of the College, the Vice Chancellor, and HR. Academic Affairs and the Dean do ask for justification should the number of adjunct lines required increase or change.

Generally, these requests should take place in March, when faculty load sheets are sent to the department for completion.

Adjunct faculty are not allowed to sponsor independent studies or experience credit work. In exceptional circumstances, the Department Chair may ask a part-time instructor to sponsor an independent study. However, this conversation should be initiated by the chair. Adjuncts should not sign off on any independent study forms unless these arrangements have been made and approved.

Additionally, graduate-level coursework and development of curriculum, as well as the creating of new selected topics courses are generally viewed as in the purview of the full-time faculty only. For more information, view Appendix E.

FERPA

Syracuse University fully complies with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and its implementing regulations. This prevents University officials, including Department of Design faculty and staff, from disclosing non-directory information unless written consent is given by the student to the University. For more on FERPA, please visit the Registrar’s website: http://www.syr.edu/registrar/students/ferpa.html. The form for a student to request disclosure of information is available from the department or from the Office of Student Affairs in VPA.

Financial Policies

The primary assumption in the use of any departmental funds is that this is student money, and should only be used to benefit the students. The policy below is drafted as a guideline to the use of departmental funds.

Purchasing

The primary assumption that all department funds are to be used for the benefit of the student applies to purchases. Where this is not clear, a rationale must be provided by the faculty member requesting the purchase prior to making the transaction.

All purchasing for the program and for any classes will be approved by the program coordinator or designated person managing the program budget. This must be done prior to requesting/making the purchase.

Purchases will be facilitated by the departmental finance administrator via the approved supplier lists. This enables the department to take advantage of the discounts available to the University. For these reasons, purchases by individuals using their personal funds will not normally be reimbursed unless agreed upon beforehand.

In addition to requested purchases, the department finance administrator will charge additional program-specific purchases to program budgets, such as software renewals, etc.

For information on purchasing computers and technology items, please see the Computers/Technology Policies section.

Research Funding

All research funding will normally be requested via the department faculty research and development funding process

The primary assumption is that research funding will facilitate an accepted research outcome such as presenting a conference paper or poster, conducting a workshop, giving a keynote address, publishing a journal article, etc.

In the event that funding is requested for a conference or event where there is no anticipated research outcome, a rationale must be submitted along with the funding request, which describes the reasons and benefits to the individual and department.

Travel Expenses

The intent of the policy is reimbursement and not compensation. All travel away from your usual place of business on university business is part of your normal contract; if you are uncomfortable in undertaking such duties, please discuss this with your supervisor.

All travel away from the office needs to be approved by the dean at the start of each semester. This includes all travel for research, classroom learning, training, and any other business purpose for which you intend to use program, department, or college funds (through reimbursement, advanced payment, etc.).

This policy will outline policies relating to traveling: meals, travel reimbursements, receipts, and cash advances. In all cases, in order to maximize the use of departmental funds, please take the most economic and/or efficient method of transport (e.g. Is it cheaper for a taxi to and from the airport than to pay for parking for a week? Is it cheaper to fly to the city and use taxis and public transportation than to drive and park? Is it cheaper to rent a car than reimburse mileage?)

Reimbursable expenses

  • If you travel on university business before 7 a.m., breakfast will be reimbursed to the value of $10.
  • If you are working away from you usual place of business before 11 a.m. and are away until after 2 p.m., lunch will be reimbursed up to the value of $20.
  • If you are away on university business and do not return before 8 p.m., dinner will be reimbursed to the value of $35.
  • If you are away for the full day, you have a total of $65 per day for food, to be divided as appropriate.
  • Entertainment of alumni or professionals, and other business meals, must be discussed in advance with the employee’s supervisor (e.g. program coordinator or chair). Meals not discussed prior to travel will not be reimbursed beyond the individual amount listed above.
  • No travel or mileage expenses will be reimbursed between your home and your usual place of business, or the same distance at the start of any extended travel (e.g. mileage to an airport a train station or vehicle rental location which is closer than your office).

Cash advances

  • Cash advance requests must be submitted 3 weeks before the date of travel. This lead time is to allow appropriate signatures to be obtained before the comptroller’s deadline.
  • Cash advances must be accounted for using receipts. Receipts are due within two weeks of return in order to allow completion of the travel voucher. Travel vouchers must be completed, signed, and received by the comptroller’s office within four weeks of completion of travel. If the advance is larger than the spent amount, the traveler must remit the difference via check to Syracuse University.

Computers/Technology Policy

Any computer hardware, software or peripherals to be purchased with SU funds must be vetted and approved through VPA IT. In addition, VPA IT staff handles the purchasing process, and takes delivery of all hardware and software. The only exceptions are for consumable products, such as printer ink, toner and paper, batteries, and storage media (disks, flash drives, etc.).

New full time tenure-track faculty members occasionally receive a technology allowance as part of their hiring contract. This amount is funded by the Dean’s office, with some funding contributed by the University.

Computer Upgrades

Full time tenure-track faculty may be eligible for a computer upgrade after 3-4 years. In order to apply for an upgrade, the faculty member must fill out the Faculty computer request form (Form DF-C) provided by academic affairs. The form must then be submitted to the chair for approval by October 1st that year.

Please note this policy does not apply to full-time faculty who have non-tenure track appointments. An effort will be made to obtain a suitable computer for faculty in these positions, however they will not be eligible for upgrades.

The above policy and process refers specifically for hardware updates. Software updates are funded by the program/department and should be requested to the program coordinator for approval.

IT Policies

There are a number of documents published by ITS that detail Syracuse University's IT and electronic communications policies: http://supolicies.syr.edu/it/computing.htm

http://supolicies.syr.edu/it/ http://its.syr.edu/infosec/standards.html

The Records Management office details retention policies that govern SU data and its archival and disposal: http://rm.syr.edu.

The Copyright & Information Policy office covers the use of copyrighted works in teaching: http://copyright.syr.edu.

For more information on VPA IT policies, or to report a computer issue, please contact VPA IT at http://ot.syr.edu or visit their SharePoint site (currently at: https://sharepoint.syr.edu/vpa/it/default.aspx).

Safety Policies

All Department of Design faculty and students are expected to maintain proper safety protocol at all times, including when taking classes, working in the shops, and working in studios.

Ambulance

If a student is injured, it is imperative that Syracuse University Ambulance is called. SUA will come down to The Warehouse, or other near campus location. SUA can be reached by dialing 315-443-4299, or #SU on a cell phone.

Emergency ambulance transport and medical transport through SUA is funded through student health fees, so there is no fee for students to use this service, though if advanced interventions are required, Rural/Metro Medical Services may

need to be called. Once the ambulance comes, a student may choose to refuse treatment or transportation to a hospital (unless the student is a minor).

If a faculty or staff member is uncomfortable calling an ambulance, s/he should contact the Department of Public Safety.

Faculty or staff members who are injured or in a medical emergency should call emergency services at 911.

Serving Alcohol

For rules concerning the serving of alcohol at events, see “Serving Alcohol at Events” section under Non-Scheduled Classes and Academic Activities.

Student Policies

The policies below are not a full and exhaustive list of policies related to students. Students have rights and responsibilities as determined by the University in addition to those outlined in the Department of Design policies. For information on University- wide policies, please visit the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities: http://studentconduct.syr.edu/policies/index.html. Students must also abide by College of Visual and Performing Arts rules as outlined in the VPA Student Handbook: http://vpa.syr.edu/current-students/undergraduate/advising-and-more/student- support.

Academic Policies

Classroom Behavior

Guidelines exist surrounding classroom behavior and student rights and responsibilities. Please visit http://studentconduct.syr.edu/policies/index.html for up to date information.

Grading Policy

A department policy to be compiled from the existing policies in each program.

Late work:

In the design field, it is imperative that you complete your projects on time. It is expected that work is due on the dates specified. No late work is accepted.

Extenuating circumstances will be considered with appropriate documentation. Please note that backing up personal computers is a student responsibility, and that computer crashes are not acceptable reasons for incomplete or late work.

In the event that there are exceptional circumstances, a student can make a formal arrangement with the instructor to complete remaining work or assignments after the course ends. In order for an incomplete to be filed, enough work must have been completed by the student prior to filing for a grade to be assigned based on the work already turned in. Incompletes cannot be given for courses a student has registered for if the student files for a leave of absence or withdraws from the University. For more on filing a Request for Incomplete Grade, refer to the SU Course Catalog and request a form from the departmental office.

Moving forward in a program:

Department of Design programs have a sequence in which courses must be completed. If a student fails a required class, the student generally will need to wait through one semester before retaking the course and continuing in the major. It is not possible for students to continue in some courses and not in others (for instance, if a communications design major fails CMD 251, s/he cannot continue in CMD 282, even if s/he passed CMD 281. Both CMD 251 and CMD 281 are pre-requisites for CMD 252 and CMD 282).

Additionally, if a student’s major grades average below C, they are placed on probation. If the student’s accumulated grades are below C during any subsequent semester, they are dropped from the program. Not only does this maintain equal standards for the department, it tells the student that, for whatever reason, they are on the wrong path and prevents more serious disaster in the junior and senior year. It allows the student to find their passion in another program while still in a place to make that change. This policy also keeps the F off of their record and allows for a smoother transition to the next level.

Field Trips/University Sponsored Travel

Syracuse University provides opportunities for student travel to activities that facilitate and/or enhance the learning process taking place within the University community. Whether the planned travel is mandatory or optional, all activities scheduled outside the University campus are subject to this policy. Participation in such activities shall be limited to members of the University community.

Participants in activities involving student travel are responsible for their own behavior and any resulting consequences. The University shall not be liable for any loss, damage, injury or other consequence resulting from a participant's failure to comply with University rules and regulations, the direction of University employees, or applicable law. The University does not provide medical insurance for any student's participation in trips. All student participants shall be responsible for any medical costs they incur during and/or as a result of the trip.

All trip participants are required to (a) comply with the standards set forth in the Syracuse University Code of Student Conduct and with applicable University policies, procedures, rules and regulations, understanding that such compliance is important to the success of the trip and to the University's willingness to permit future similar activities; and (b) conform their conduct to the standards surrounding the trip and assume responsibility for their own actions, understanding the circumstances of an off-campus activity may require a standard of decorum that may differ from that applicable on campus. Violations of the foregoing requirements may subject participants and sponsoring organizations to disciplinary action pursuant to the Syracuse University Judicial System Policies and Procedures.

All students participating in student travel must attend the pre-trip meeting, fill out a Student Travel Form, and an Off-Campus Travel Waiver and Assumption of Risk Form.

For more information on each of these requirements, as well as the full travel policy, see Appendix C.

Independent Studies

In order to propose an independent study, a Proposal for Independent Study Form must be submitted. Forms are available on the registrar's website, and must be filled out completely before they are submitted for department chair signature.

Only up to 12 credits worth of independent studies AND experience credits combined can be counted toward a degree in VPA (per college rules).

Independent studies must follow these academic rules:

  • An independent study cannot be taken when the same or similar content is taught in a course that is offered that same semester.
  • An independent study cannot be substituted for a required course, and will only count for an elective course. Whether the independent study will count for academic or studio elective credit should be discussed with the faculty sponsor and written explicitly at the top of the form.
  • An independent study cannot repeat course topics that have been introduced or practiced in other required courses, unless the independent study represents a significant expansion of knowledge on previously covered topics.
  • An independent study must be as rigorous (if not more rigorous) when compared to a typical design course. However, an independent study does not need to meet for the same number of contact minutes as a regular scheduled class, as an independent study is not intended to mimic a class, but should be a student-driven experience.
  • An independent study form must be submitted no later than the first week of classes, and preferably before the start of classes. This is necessary to ensure that students meet their required course load and to allow necessary time for students to reconfigure their schedules should the independent study proposal be declined.
  • An independent study must not interfere with the instructors workload requirements in other classes.
  • Adjunct faculty cannot sponsor independent studies.
  • Teaching assistantships cannot be done for credit, regardless of whether or not an independent study form is completed.
  • Faculty must make sure the last four digits of the faculty sponsor SUID number are listed, as well as whether or not the class is for academic or studio credit.

Additionally, all independent study forms must abide by the following rules:

  • Faculty must complete the second half of the form. Faculty should complete this electronically so as to ensure adequate space for the procedures and information required by the form. If you need more space, please attach a second sheet. Forms with insufficient detail will result in the proposal being returned. Students should not be filling out this section, as it is a faculty responsibility to determine the amount of work to be completed and the criteria for assessing this work at the end of the semester.
  • The program coordinator of the program in which the independent study is being completed must sign off on the form below the "Dept. Chair Signature" line. If, for instance, a student is completing an independent study form in communications design, the program coordinator of communications design must sign off on the form before the chair will sign. This does not replace the department chair signature.
  • The advisor signature and faculty sponsor signature cannot normally be the same (please provide a rationale in this case). If a student's advisor and faculty sponsor are the same, then the program coordinator must sign off on the advisor line (as well as below the Dept. Chair Signature line as above)

Internships (Experience Credit)

An internship will have a minimum of one credit and a maximum of three credits. In all cases, a detailed rationale, description of the work to be undertaken and the assessment process will be provided for approval before the internship takes place. Internship proposals cannot be submitted after the internship begins. Credit will only be given during the semester that the work experience takes place. For instance, summer internships cannot receive credit in the fall or spring semester.

Internships that span more than one semester (e.g. fall and spring, summer and fall) must be requested as multiple internship proposals (e.g. one for the fall and one for the spring). For more detailed information and policies, as well as directions on approving internships, see Appendix B.

Internships will involve a work experience component, as well as an additional work or study component. They will also include some form of self-reflective component such as a journal where the student records and reflects on their learning. Additional program requirements and rules also apply (See Appendix B).

Only up to 12 credits worth of independent studies AND experience credits combined can be counted toward a degree in VPA (per college rules).

Absence Policy

Most courses in the Department of Design are not courses based on a textbook, but rather rely on information and techniques taught in class. Because semesters are only 14 weeks long, each absence constitutes missing a significant part of the class experience. Additionally, students are expected to recognize the importance of professional behavior and to show respect for faculty and their fellow students by arriving on time to class each week. Therefore, the following absence policies are in place.

Once a week classes:

  • Each absence drops a student’s grade one full grade for the semester (e.g. from a B- to a C-).
  • Three absences will automatically lead to a failing grade.
  • Tardiness: late less than 30 minutes drops ½ grade (e.g. from a B to a B-). Late more than 30 minutes but less than 1 hour drops 1 full grade (e.g. from a B to a C).
  • Faculty discretion used for obvious, necessary absences (documented illness, family tragedies, etc.)

Twice a week classes:

  • Each student has one “free” absence (for illness, family purpose, or other reason).
  • Each additional absence will drop a student’s grade one full grade for the semester (e.g. from a B- to a C-).
  • Tardiness: If you arrive within 30 minutes of the start of class, you are considered tardy. Three instances of tardiness constitute one absence. If you are late by more than 30 minutes, you are considered absent.
  • Faculty discretion used for absences after the one “free” absence (for illness, family tragedies, etc.).

Sometimes, students may have multiple absences beyond their control (for instance, for a medical condition). Students in those situations should discuss with their advisors. Students may want to request a grade of “incomplete” in order to have more time to make up the work. Alternatively, students may need to file a leave of absence.

Excused Absences:

A note about absences: sometimes, students will have required fieldtrips or other required activities that take place outside of class time. Instructors are responsible for making students aware of required activities taking place outside of class time (field trips that take place outside of class time should be determined by the major classes by the first week of classes and listed on syllabi so that students are aware of any conflicts). If the required activity conflicts with a class, the instructor assigning the activity should liaise with other faculty that are affected and provide means for students to contact their other instructors (e.g. an excuse form). All of this should take place during the first two weeks of the semester.

Religious Observances Policy

SU religious observances policy, found at http://supolicies.syr.edu/emp_ben/religious_observance.htm, recognizes the diversity of faiths represented among the campus community and protects the rights of students, faculty, and staff to observe religious holidays according to their tradition. Under the policy, students are provided an opportunity to make up any examination, study, or work requirements that may be missed due to a religious observance provided they notify their instructors before the end of the second week of classes. For fall and spring semesters, an online notification process is available through MySlice > StudentServices > Enrollment > MyReligiousObservances from the first day of class until the end of the second week of class.

Academic Integrity

Students are responsible for following Syracuse University’s Academic Integrity Policy. The current statement regarding Academic Integrity is as follows:

Syracuse University’s Academic Integrity Policy holds students accountable for the integrity of the work they submit. Students should be familiar with the policy and know that it is their responsibility to learn about course-specific expectations, as well as about university policy. The university policy governs appropriate citation and use of sources, the integrity of work submitted in exams and assignments, and the veracity of signatures on attendance sheets and other verification of participation in class activities. The policy also prohibits students from submitting the same written work in more than one class or assignment without receiving written authorization in advance from both instructors. The presumptive penalty for a first offense by an undergraduate student is course failure, accompanied by a transcript notation indicating that the failure resulted from a violation of Academic Integrity Policy. The standard sanction for a first offense by a graduate student is suspension or expulsion. For more information and the complete policy, see http://academicintegrity.syr.edu.

Related Links:

The Academic Integrity Policy: http://academicintegrity.syr.edu/academic-integrity- policy/

Twenty Questions and Answers about the Academic Integrity Policy: http://academicintegrity.syr.edu/faculty-resources/

What does academic integrity mean?: http://academicintegrity.syr.edu/what-does- academic-integrity-mean/

Disability-Related Accommodations

If you believe that you need accommodations for a disability, please contact the Office of Disability Services (ODS), http://disabilityservices.syr.edu, located in Room 309 of 804 University Avenue, or call (315) 443-4498 or TDD: (315) 443-1371 for an appointment to discuss your needs and the process for requesting accommodations. ODS is responsible for coordinating disability-related accommodations and will issue students with documented Disabilities Accommodation Authorization Letters, as appropriate. Since accommodations may require early planning and generally are not provided retroactively, please contact ODS as soon as possible.

FERPA

Syracuse University fully complies with the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act and its implementing regulations. This prevents University officials, including Department of Design faculty and staff, from disclosing non-directory information unless written consent is given by the student to the University. For more on FERPA, please visit the Registrar’s website: http://www.syr.edu/registrar/students/ferpa.html. The form for a student to request disclosure of information is available from the department or from the Office of Student Affairs in VPA.

Facilities

Department facilities must be maintained and respected by all students, faculty, and staff. The following safety regulations must be observed:

  • Aerosol products including spray paint and spray adhesive cannot be stored or kept on the upper levels. This is a fire marshal regulation. Aerosol products must be kept in the flammable cabinets in the basement, where the spray booth can be found.
  • Aerosol products cannot be used outside of the spray booth.
  • Paper and other materials should not be stored on top of the heaters located around the windows.
  • End of the semester: students are responsible for cleaning up their materials, desks, and studios at the end of the semester. Failure to do so may lead to loss of 24 hour access to the building. Any materials, items, and projects left at the end of the semester become property of the department and may be destroyed, disposed of, or donated/sold

Personal Safety

Lone working: If Faculty, staff or students need to work alone in the building they should notify the DPS officer at the front desk of their presence and the times that they will be working.

Ambulance

If you are injured, it is imperative that Syracuse University Ambulance is called. SUA will come down to The Warehouse, or other near campus location. SUA can be reached by dialing 315-443-4299, or #SU on a cell phone.

Emergency ambulance transport and medical transport through SUA is funded through student health fees, so there is no fee for students to use this service, though if advanced interventions are required, Rural/Metro Medical Services may need to be called. Once the ambulance comes, a student may choose to refuse treatment or transportation to a hospital (unless the student is a minor).

If you are uncomfortable calling an ambulance for someone, you should contact the Department of Public Safety at the front desk of The Warehouse.

Appendix A: Classroom Disruption Response Guidelines

The following guidelines are based on a proposed draft of guidelines being developed by the University’s Academic Coordinating Committee. When that document is complete, we will provide a more updated version. These guidelines are intended to help faculty navigate situations in which classroom conduct by one or more students has become disruptive. Often in such situations, faculty are unsure how to respond and do not want to “get a student or students in trouble” by making a formal complaint or escalate the situation by making an issue of the behavior. There are ways at the outset to manage classroom disruptions informally, but professionally and in an effective manner, as well as more formal approaches when informal means do not seem to be working.

Faculty Rights and Responsibilities

Classroom environment has a significant impact on learning. Faculty members have the right, responsibility, and authority to create and maintain a classroom environment that supports the educational process.

Student Rights and Responsibilities

"Students have the right to express themselves freely on any subject provided they do so in a manner that does not violate [University policies or Federal, State, or local laws]. Students in turn have the responsibility to respect the right of all members of the University to exercise these freedoms....................................................... Students have the right to accurate and plainly stated information relating to......................................................... individual course objectives and requirements....... Students have the responsibility to attend class and know their appropriate class requirements." (See http://students.syr.edu/judicial/policies/responsibilities.html)

Purpose of Guidelines

The following guidelines are offered to help faculty respond to classroom disruption and promote an environment conducive to student learning.

Classroom Disruption levels, definitions, and response suggestions

Level 1:

Nuisance behavior such as texting, engaging in non-class related or personal conversations with others, talking on the phone during class, interrupting the instructor or other students, monopolizing class discussion and refusing to listen to others, etc.

Suggested responses:

Caution the entire class rather than singling out an individual student. If it is necessary to speak to an individual student, do so after class unless the situation requires an immediate response. If an immediate response is necessary, ask the student to stop the conduct and talk with you after class or during office hours.

Consider whether you want to document your interaction with the student. Informal interactions cannot be used by the Office of Judicial Affairs (OJA) as historical information in support of a conduct charge.

Level 2:

Repeated disruptive nuisance behavior such as texting, engaging in non-class related or personal conversations with others, talking on the phone during class, interrupting the instructor or other students, monopolizing class discussion and refusing to listen to others, etc.

Suggested responses:

A student who persists in behavior that disrupts the class may be asked to leave the class for the remainder of the class period. Tell the student why you are asking him or her to leave and give him or her the opportunity to discuss this with you before the next class period. If the student refuses to leave, you may request assistance from the Department of Public Safety (DPS).

Discuss the student's behavior with him or her and agree on what is acceptable behavior. Document the agreement. Keep a copy for yourself and give a copy to the student and to your department chair and/or undergraduate dean's office. This documented interaction may be used by the Office of Judicial Affairs (OJA) in support of a conduct charge, and OJA recommends that you file a complaint.

Level 3:

Defiant behaviors such as ignoring non-academic directives intended to preserve the learning environment; yelling, swearing, bullying, or intimidating the instructor or students; disorderly conduct per the code of student conduct, intentional disruptive or obstructive conduct per the code of student conduct, etc.

Suggested responses:

If it is possible to reason with the student, ask the student to leave the class for the remainder of the class period. Tell the student why you are asking him or her to leave and give him or her the opportunity to discuss this with you before the next class period. Discuss the student's behavior with him and her and agree on what is acceptable behavior. Document the agreement. Keep a copy for yourself and give a copy to the student and to your department chair and/or undergraduate dean's office. This documented interaction may be used by the Office of Judicial Affairs (OJA) in support of a conduct charge, and OJA recommends that you file a complaint.

If it is not possible to reason with the student or the student refuses to leave, contact DPS for assistance. Report the incident to your department chair and the undergraduate dean's office. Determine with your department chair and/or undergraduate dean's office before the next class meeting whether you will permit the student to return to class or whether you will request an administrative drop. Document the actions. Keep a copy for yourself and give a copy to the student and to your department chair and/or undergraduate dean's office. OJA recommends that you also file a complaint with OJA.

Level 4:

Safety-related behaviors such as fighting, threats of harm, etc.

Suggested responses:

Request immediate assistance from DPS. DPS will refer to OJA. Be prepared to attend a hearing if necessary.

If you want the student to return to class, discuss with the student and agree on what is acceptable behavior. Document the agreement. Keep a copy for yourself and give a copy to the student and to your department chair and/or undergraduate dean's office.

If you do not want the student to return to class, request an administrative drop.

Other Steps:

Many faculty have policies for addressing conduct in the classroom that do not violate the code (e.g. student talking in class, but not on topic) through the grading of class participation. Others include a statement about expected classroom conduct in their syllabi. Those who do not should be encouraged to develop classroom conduct standards whether or not they choose to grade participation.

Schools/colleges will need to develop procedures for making timely decisions about whether a student will be permitted to return to class or administratively dropped.

Administrative drop rules will need to reflect this type of administrative drop.

Appendix B: Internship Policy

Program-Specific Internship Rules

Communications Design

  • The Communications Design Program does not normally award credits for work experience. Most students graduate with “real world” design experience acquired during summers and/or other part-time employment. CMD believes such experience is invaluable but not a replacement for studio or academic work; rather, it extends, enhances, and compliments our curriculum.
  • One credit per internship will be awarded by consensus of the Communications Design faculty after the internship is completed. Your submission will be evaluated by the same criteria used for our Design Problems (CMD 450) class. The following procedure must be followed if you want to apply for academic credit for work experience.
    • Keep a journal that describes your internship and records what you have observed and learned.
    • Document and collect comps or samples of all projects you work on.
    • Obtain a letter from your supervisor confirming and evaluating the particulars of your experience. (This should also verify the number of hours/days you were employed.)
    • Work that does not represent your problem-solving abilities, aesthetic judgment, or design skills will not be considered appropriate for experience credit. However, you may redo projects you have worked on during the internship to meet these criteria.
      • The Communications Design faculty will review your materials and schedule a meeting with you to discuss your internship. In many instances you will be invited to make a classroom presentation to share your experiences with other students.
      • Appropriate credit, if any, will be awarded as Experience Credit.
        • Museum studies students are required to complete a 3-credit intensive internship as part of the curriculum. This internship is normally completed over the summer.
        • Internships may also be taken during the academic year, but these are generally not an immersion experience like the summer internship. The academic year internship will generally not replace the summer intensive experience.
        • Once internships have been completed students must meet with their faculty sponsor for a debriefing and they must also submit a paper discussing the experience.
        • Supervisors at the students’ internship sites must submit evaluations.
          • Under most circumstances, internships will be conducted in cooperation with the University’s internship office.

Museum Studies

  • Museum studies students are required to complete a 3-credit intensive internship as part of the curriculum. This internship is normally completed over the summer.
  • Internships may also be taken during the academic year, but these are generally not an immersion experience like the summer internship. The academic year internship will generally not replace the summer intensive experience.
  • Once internships have been completed students must meet with their faculty sponsor for a debriefing and they must also submit a paper discussing the experience.
  • Supervisors at the students’ internship sites must submit evaluations.
    • Under most circumstances, internships will be conducted in cooperation with the University’s internship office.

Appendix C: Field Trip Policy

Field Trips

Syracuse University, in furtherance of its not-for-profit mission as an institution of higher education, through its various departments and offices, provides opportunities for student travel to activities that facilitate and/or enhance the learning process taking place within the University community. Participation in such activities shall be limited to members of the University community. These Guidelines do not apply to international travel, study abroad travel, or travel under the auspices of the Department of Athletics or for Student Organizations. SU Abroad, the Risk Management Department, the Department of Athletics, and/or the Division of Student Affairs should be consulted on those matters.

To assure that events or activities involving student travel are consistent with the University's mission and that student safety issues have been addressed, University sponsored student travel must be approved in advance by the program coordinator and the department chair.

Whether the planned travel is mandatory or optional, all activities scheduled outside the University campus are subject to this policy.

Department of Design Student Travel Guidelines

Participants in activities involving student travel are responsible for their own behavior and any resulting consequences. The University shall not be liable for any loss, damage, injury or other consequence resulting from a participant's failure to comply with University rules and regulations, the direction of University employees, or applicable law.

Please note for University sponsored travel, it is the responsibility of the program sponsoring the trip to assure compliance with these guidelines including any reference policies such as the University's vehicle safety policy.

The following additional guidelines also apply to all travel activities sponsored/organized by the department: for all field trips, the faculty member is responsible for the following:

  1. Pre-trip Meeting: The faculty member, administrator, and/or recognized student organization in charge of the trip, whether sponsored or not sponsored, should hold a pre-trip planning meeting with all participants to discuss the planned itinerary, behavioral expectations, and transportation details.
  2. Transportation: The sponsoring University program should be prepared to arrange for transportation by official University vehicle(s), rental vehicle(s), chartered service, regularly scheduled transportation service, or, if necessary, personal vehicles. The following rules apply to the use of vehicles.
    1. University Vehicles - Only University employees can drive. (Refer to the University Vehicle Safety Policy)
    2. Rental Vehicles - If rented with University funds, only University employees can drive*; all terms of the rental contract must be complied with. The University prohibits departments or employees from renting 15 passenger vans on or for University business.
    3. Contract Bus Service - Adequate insurance coverage for personal injury and property damage must be provided by the bus company. If the company carries less than five (5) million dollars per occurrence, the Risk Management Department (315-443-4011) must be consulted to determine if a lower coverage amount is acceptable.
    4. Regularly Scheduled Carriers - Regular scheduled transportation service providers (e.g., Greyhound, Amtrak) may be utilized for transportation.
      1. Personal Vehicles - Personal Vehicles should only be used on a voluntary basis. The owners/drivers must provide their own insurance coverage. All student participants choosing to ride in a private automobile do so voluntarily and at their own risk. The University shall not insure or accept liability for any damage, loss or injury resulting from the use of a private vehicle. The University does not provide comprehensive or collision (physical damage) insurance for private vehicles driven on University business, and the owner is responsible for primary liability insurance. The University does carry non-owner excess liability coverage to protect the University and employee in the event of a suit resulting from an automobile accident in which an employee was driving on University business.

*Who can drive?  Any University faculty/employee, provided they have completed the University Driver’s training, is authorized to drive rental vehicles for students on field trips. Graduate students that work for the University are also authorized to drive, provided they have completed the driver’s training, and are doing so as part of their job duties.

III.          Accident and Medical Insurance

The faculty member or administrators responsible for the trip shall communicate to the participants that the University does not provide medical insurance for any student's participation in trips. All student participants shall be responsible for any medical costs they incur during and/or as a result of the trip.

IV.           Participation

Except with the permission of the appropriate administrator, friends and family of students are not eligible to participate in travel opportunities falling under the Department of Design Travel Policy.

All participants are required to engage in the planned activities of the trip. Unstructured time should be kept to a minimum to reduce the risks inherent in unsupervised activity. The sponsoring department or organization should keep a list of all participants involved in the trip.

All trip participants are required to (a) comply with the standards set forth in the Syracuse University Code of Student Conduct and with applicable University policies, procedures, rules and regulations, understanding that such compliance is important to the success of the trip and to the University's willingness to permit future similar activities; and (b) conform their conduct to the standards surrounding the trip and assume responsibility for their own actions, understanding the circumstances of an off-campus activity may require a standard of decorum that may differ from that applicable on campus. Violations of the foregoing requirements may subject participants and sponsoring organizations to disciplinary action pursuant to the Syracuse University Judicial System Policies and Procedures.

V.           FORMS and INFORMATION NEEDED

All field trips that involve students in the department must meet the following requirements (whether travel occurs within the limits of Onondaga County or beyond its boundaries):

  1. Travel must be in support of the program curricula. Travel must be planned so as not to create an undue interference with academic responsibilities.
  2. The faculty member organizing the field trip must complete and submit the Student Travel Form to the Design Department Office no later than three (3) business days before the scheduled trip, which contains emergency contact information for each student participating on the trip, as well as trip details.
  3. All students traveling must complete and submit an Off-Campus Travel Waiver and Assumption of Risk Form to the faculty member no later than five (5) business days before the scheduled trip. The faculty member will then submit a copy to the Design Department office.
  4. All University sponsored travel must be chaperoned by a faculty or staff member, except as provided in Section V(C) below. Syracuse University will view this faculty/staff member as the party responsible for the trip. Furthermore, the faculty/staff member must carry a copy of all emergency contact information for all students participating in the trip.
    1. The name, address, and telephone number of the faculty/staff mentor to the recognized student organization must be submitted utilizing the appropriate form. Faculty/staff mentors also are required to maintain a copy of the appropriate form and discuss the Syracuse University Code of Student Conduct with the recognized student organization leader(s) organizing the trip. The faculty/staff mentor is expected to exchange emergency contact numbers with students and obtain an indication of who each student desires to be notified in the event of an emergency.
    2. All trips are required to follow the Division of Student Affairs Student Travel Guidelines noted in section VII, below.
    3. Any trip taken without submission of a complete and accurate Student Travel Form or other violations of this policy, may result in individual and/or organizational discipline as outlined in the University Judicial System Handbook, together with such additional action as may be deemed appropriate under the circumstances.

Appendix D: Minimal Expectations for Faculty Advising of Students

Advising of undergraduate and graduate students is considered by Syracuse University and the College of Visual and Performing Arts to be an important aspect of a faculty member’s teaching responsibilities. Faculty members are expected to report their advising activities when completing the annual CV Update Form, itself a key document in annual performance reviews and determination of merit salary adjustments made by department chairs.

It is, however, often unclear what expectations the college has for faculty performance with regard to advising. The following statement of expectations are to be understood as a set of minimal expectations, which may be fleshed out more fully at the department or program level, or articulated by individual faculty members themselves in consultation with the department chair and faculty colleagues.

Minimal expectations for academic advising by faculty members:

  • All full-time faculty members are expected to engage in advising of undergraduate students in their program (unless formally assigned to other duties in lieu of advising). Assignment of advising loads by the department chair or designated program coordinator should be equitable.
  • All full-time faculty members are expected to be available to advise graduate students as needed.
  • Faculty advisors are expected to maintain and keep up-to-date a file that records each student advisee’s program of study (a.k.a., curriculum worksheet), petition forms, and other relevant documentation pertaining to the student’s progress toward graduation. While students are ultimately responsible for their own decisions regarding course selection and progress toward the degree, faculty advisors are  expected  to  notify those who are not making adequate progress and to explain what they must do to get back on track.
  • Faculty advisors are expected to assist their advisees in making significant decisions about academic choices such as transferring to another major, adding a minor or second major, orienting coursework or internships around career goals, as well as advice on achieving a well-rounded education. Such advice may consist of the faculty member sharing her/his own knowledge of a discipline, industry, or career path or may involve helping the student identify appropriate others on or beyond campus who have such expertise.
  • Faculty advisors are expected to be informed (or know how to access the relevant information) regarding university or college policies or procedures related to advising issues, and to share this knowledge with their advisees when requested.
  •  Faculty advisors are expected to periodically reflect on and assess the practice and quality of their advising activities and to report these assessments on their annual CV Update (due in January of each academic year).

NOTE: In keeping with the college’s general philosophy of maintaining appropriate flexibility at the local level, departments or programs may propose as exceptions to this policy an alternative means of achieving effective advising of students (e.g., an equitable division of service responsibilities such that some faculty members but not others engage in some or all aspects of student advising). Any such plan must have the endorsement of the full faculty in the relevant department.

Appendix E: Curricular Responsibilities for Full Time Faculty

General principle regarding teaching responsibilities of full-time and part-time faculty members

Duties such as the following are generally viewed as in the purview of the full-time faculty and should not be assigned to part-time instructors:

  • Graduate-level courses
  • Independent studies
  • Development of curriculum or creating of new selected topics courses

Exceptions to the general principle

  • Under the following circumstances, an exception to the general principle outlined above will be granted (as determined by the appropriate program coordinator and department chair and with the approval of the dean):
    • When the part-time instructor holds the appropriate terminal degree and related credentials qualifying her/him to teach at the graduate level and/or to supervise an independent study, and
    • When there is a clearly articulated need because of the unavailability of an appropriate full-time faculty member to teach the course or supervise the independent study, and/or
      • When there is a demonstrated need to provide a diversity of graduate instructors and the academic program/department does not have available an appropriate number of qualified full-time faculty members to provide the needed diversity.