Udated 08/07

Cataloguing policy (books and other print materials, draft as of 5my16)

Background: When SCRC cataloguers were brought under the umbrella of the Catalogue Department (2005), stated goals were both to bring the underlying framework into line with general cataloguing conventions, and, more importantly, to document the details of SCRC practice (prior to that it was purely oral tradition). The “Checklist for SCRC Cataloging” was developed to guide the cataloguers’ work and to remove some decision-making from the Library technician cataloguers.

1. SCRC cataloguing policies and procedures rest on a range of national standards (RDA, AACR-2, CONSER, DCRM, etc.) and are developed in the context of SUL’s overall cataloguing policy as set by the Acquisitions and Cataloguing Department. Within this framework, procedures are created to meet SCRC needs for detailed description and enhanced access to support service needs of the collections. In addition, items are generally identified at the printing rather than the edition level; however, these records are not added to OCLC.

2. Cataloguing priorities are set by the Managers’ Group at the start of a calendar year. Curators, cataloguers, the head of public services, and the lead archivist meet to discuss, review and evaluate collections as to the range of materials included to aid in creating the cataloguing framework which identifies access and levels of description. The framework is documented in the online procedures and may be revised once the project in underway. This framework identifies gift and provenance notes, linking notes to manuscript and other collections, item needs in terms physical description (binding, state, imperfections).

3. New donations and materials flagged for cataloging identified during the processing of manuscript collections are not to be sent directly to cataloguing. These items should be added to the SCRC cataloguing backlog with a “Checklist for SCRC Cataloging” form completed and inserted into each piece. Only new purchases and agreed upon cataloguing priorities should be routed to cataloguing. Occasional rush and priority items may be inserted into the queue when necessary as well as “small” one-time gifts (usually 10 or fewer items).

4. Gifts and restricted fund purchases: Donor and fund names are transcribed in 590 (local notes).    Research gift copies are also identified through a 590-note: Includes research material from the ... Papers at the Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries.  No other gift note is needed.  Details and forms of notes may be found in procedures below.

5. Full-level cataloguing standards are used, unless curators request that Descriptive Cataloguing of Rare Materials (DCRM) standards be used, or, materials demand those standards in the judgment of cataloguing staff. Early upstate New York print materials and items published before 1700 generally receive DCRM treatment, with signature statements mandatory for items printed before 1600.

6. Subject access may be enhanced to highlight subjects of local interest and link an item to SCRC collections. Genre headings are added when deemed necessary by project guidelines or requested on “Checklist.” They are not removed from records containing them. Music subject analysis will be coordinated with the music specialists to bring score subject access into line with standards developed for Belfer sound recordings.

7. Unique item identifiers such as ownership and other inscriptions, stamps, bookplates, binding and bookseller tags, etc.) are generally noted.

8. OCLC records are used, when possible, with minimal changes. The range of pre-AACR2 records, as well as AACR2, RDA, RDA hybrid, DCRB (Descriptive Cataloguing of Rare Books), and DCRM records may be used with as is, with one exception. The physical description (MARC field 300) should be evaluated for clarity and completeness to insure that pagination and illustrative matter is adequately shown. Unless incorrect, information is not removed from records.

9. SCRC classifies all print materials using Library of Congress (LC) call numbers. Classification follows current standard call number practices to the extent possible; split collections will occur when call numbers change for subjects or literary authors. In 2014, SCRC managers and cataloguers agreed to abandon a number of locally-developed LC schemes used in the past to group items together and to rely on catalogue searches to collocate materials rather than physical location. Exception: exact copies will be added to the existing local call numbers. Local schemes such as that used for Browder, or, for the New York printing collection, will not be created in the future.

10. New titles are added to the general LC collection, unless donor or other considerations merit a separate, named collection.  The collection is divided among octavo (up to 28 cm), folio (29-49 cm), and flat folio (50 cm and up).  Maps, broadsides, posters, and other single-sheet items are house in the map cases; in addition, items consisting of only a few leaves, or especially fragile, may be housed in the cases for better protection.

11. New materials are not added to the Dewey collection; related or duplicate items currently in Dewey are reclassified to LC at the time the new item is catalogued.  The New York State collection is also frozen, except for adding exact duplicates. However, both collections will remain separate for the foreseeable future.

12. Exact duplicates will share a single bibliographic record, with local notes tied to the specific copies, and separate holdings records for each copy; previously, all copies had their own bibliographic record.  Any differences (printing, paperbound/hard bound, presence/absence of publishers' advertisements or illustrations) require 2 bibliographic records in order to fully describe each copy.

13. Serials will be catalogued as such and enhanced as necessary to meet access needs. Additional access points and enhancements may be made when new issues are added. Cataloguers will create, or enhance records to full CONSER level on OCLC. EXCEPTIONS: serial issues acquired because of a single article will follow standards for component parts for article(s) of interest. Component parts must comprise at least a page, preferably more; smaller articles, notices, and other references of interest will be highlighted in the serial record, and if appropriate, access points provided. Theme issues will generally be catalogued as monographs to provide access to issue content.

14. Access to names will be enhanced by creating access points for contributors to and editors of serials and other materials when appropriate. Publisher, printer, illustrator entries are added when merited, especially for older items. Generally all names in the statement of responsibility will receive access points: authors of introductions and afterwards, illustrators, translators, etc.

15. Contents of serials, anthologies, and multi-volume sets will be highlighted when necessary to bring out and provide access to content of local interest and appropriate access points added.



Procedures

New receipts: Cataloguing and processing

New receipts include purchased titles, gift titles (including those given that cited or used SCRC collections), print items removed from manuscript collections, and current periodicals and serials received and sent to SCRC by Acquisitions and Cataloguing serials staff.

 

 

 


General collections policies apply unless otherwise stated in this document.

Procedures and general cataloguing guidelines

The Basics

Select the most complete OCLC bibliographic record for the item in hand. When possible choose DLC or PCC member records. Use DCRB or DCRMB record if found and curator has requested that level of cataloguing.


Always use the “validate heading” feature in Connexion to check name and subject headings authority records. Search online authority file to determine if authorized form exists and correct headings as needed. If no authority records exists, use the form in the record.


If there are both monograph and serial records for a title, check the series in the authority file. Also check SUMMIT for past treatment of the series. Finally, check with one of the catalogue librarians for guidance if necessary.


For new purchased titles: Search SUMMIT to see if there is an order record. If found, verify that owning library is SP (if it is SU, ask one of the librarians to change it in order that the record can be overlaid.


Multiple copies: Formerly every copy had its own bibliographic record; currently exact copies will be represented by one bibliographic record with separate holdings records for each copy.

Call number guidelines

General:

Prior to June 2014, a number of call number anomolies were policy; these had the goal of using classification to create sub-collections based on collecting strengths, donors, and other local considerations. Often, 2 copies of the same item would be classified differently, one to support the local, and one in the expected call number. When discussions revealed that these practices were no longer serving either service or retrieval needs, the Managers' Group decided to end them. In most cases, standard LC or member library assigned call numbers will be used. However, second copies will be added to the local call number, but all new versions will be classified according to standard LC practice.

A brief survey of former local practice follows:

Monographs

General policies

FOR Non-DCRB SCRC cataloging

  1. Select the best record from among competing records (DLC preferred)
    1. Usually the one with the most holdings is the best choice (however, make sure record matches what's in hand to the edition level)
    2. For NYS and other items designated by curator as needing extra attention, a dcrb or dcrm record may be preferable. These may be found as separate master records, or information from institution records may be copied and pasted into master records for local use.
  2. Review the record, correct any obvious errors in spelling or format, bringing record up to AACR-2 standards. Assume record is more correct than not, unless evidence to contrary. Full-level (blank or I) DLC records (or those with pcc in 042 field) and Desc a (indicating AACR2) should require no changes to existing data.
  3. Always add date to the call number (090 or 050). Use workletters (b- ) to distinguish versions of the same printing published in the same year. When present, use printing dates in call numbers.
  4. Add title variations if necessary for access.
    1. Use 246 with appropriate tagging for alternative variants on piece.
    2. Use 246 3, 2nd indicator blank for access to alternative entries for titles containing numbers or symbols.
    3. Use 740, 2nd indicator 2, for analytic entries (access to sections within a work)
  5. Always add edition statement (MARC field 250) if present on piece, but not included in record. For English-language works,any statement that indicates an edition is added as such. Include names associated with that edition:
    1. 2nd ed., rev. and enl. / ‡b by W.H. Chalmer
  6. Publication statement (MARC field 260)
    1. Make sure US place is named in subfield a if foreign city is listed first on publication (we do not need to list foreign cities when the follow US place; do not remove if found in OCLC record)
    2. Record copyright dates if present in book and not in OCLC record; adjust fixed field date type and dates as necessary.
  7. Physical description (do not change if essentially correct)
    1. Always add leaves or pages of plates to subfield a (removing plates from subfield b)
    2. Generic ill. suffices for the vast majority; indicate col. when appropriate; facsims., maps and ports. are among the more common specifics brought out.
    3. For older items, verify size.
  8. Add access points (500, 590, 6XX, 7XX) as indicated by the curator form.
    1. 500 notes may be needed for illustrators and other names not mentioned in subfield c of 245 and designated as important by curators.
    2. 590 notes needed for gifts, linking notes to collections, or other special aspects of copy (See below for details on 5xx notes)
    3. Add genre subjects headings (655) only if requested by curators or instructions for a specific collection's processing; leave in 655 already in OCLC records if they are relevant.
    4. Non-fiction works must have at least one LC subject heading; add additional subject headings (600,610,611,630,650) requested by curator
    5. Add name entries (700,710,711) and appropriate relator terms when applicatble.
    6. Add additional title entries (730 for uniform titles--serials mainly--and 740)
  9. 856 fields may appear in records; delete any deemed "unimportant" or that no longer work (also delete the 007 if present.
    1. Current titles--such as Oates materials--contain links to publisher, author, tables of contents, or sample texts from the item being catalogued. Because LC currently hosts much of this datam it is left in the bibliographic record with the appropriate sub-field z as the first element. Information must be copied and added to an 856 in the MARC holdings record.
      1. 856 41 ‡z Electronic version: Sample text only:‡u http://www.loc.gov/catdir/samples/hm051/2003056793.html
      2. 856 42 ‡z Related electronic resource: Publisher description ‡u http://www.loc.gov/catdir/description/hm041/2003056793.html
    2. Table of contents information may be copied into a 505 in addition to providing the link. This allows for keyword searching on terms found here. Delete the 856 from the record.
    3. Links to electronic versions of the work being catalogued:
      1. General policy is not be make a link from the paper record to the electronic version.
      2. However, extenuating circumstances such as the fragility of the paper or a request from a curator allow such links to be made. Follow the example above for an electronic version.

Variant printings: policies and procedures

  1. Edit OCLC records to reflect printings, if other than the first:
    1. Some background: SCRC attempts to distinguish all bibliographic variants of a title. OCLC, in theory, distinguishes only true editions. OCLC records for a particular edition must be edited for different states or later printings of that edition.
      1. Procedures: If using the OCLC record for the first printing of an edition, edit dates as follows:
        1. Fixed field dates: Do not change (remains DtSt s with date of first printing)
        2. 260: leave date in $c as is and add the printing date in $g: … $c 1994 $g (Sept. 1997 printing)
        3. Call number: use printing date in the call number. Use a workletter to distinguish different printings from the same year, e.g. 1976b ; 1976c ; etc. (do not use work letter a unless you are cataloguing a facsimile)
        4. Use a 500 note for a numbered printing that lacks a date.
        5. Also use a 500 note, with source of information, for printing statements expressed as numbers of copies, e.g., 12,000-15,000th: 12,000-15,000th (title page verso)
    2. Policy issues:
      1. SCRC retains all variant printings.
        1. True duplicates (exact match to printing/state level) are discovered, decision has been made to withdraw them for both Science fiction and Grove projects. For New York State printing collection, keep everything. For other collections, consult with curators.
        2. Each printing has its own SUMMIT record, even if derived from the same OCLC master record. True duplicates may have their own SUMMIT records (this depends on the extent of the uniqueness of each copy as well as location or collection considerations) or they may be added on different holdings records attached to the same bibliographic record.
    3. Some useful definitions from AACR2:
      1. Edition: All copies produced from essentially the same type image (whether by direct contact or by photographic or other methods) and issued by the same entity.
      2. Impression: All copies of an edition of a book, pamphlet, etc., printed at one time (what we commonly call a “printing”)
      3. Issue: Copies of an edition forming a distinct group that are distinguished from other copies of that edition by minor but well-defined variations (e.g., a new impression of a book for which minor revisions have been incorporated into the original type image).
      4. Reprint: 1. A new printing of an item made from the original type image, commonly by photographic methods. The reprint may reproduce the original exactly or it may contain minor but well-defined variations 2. A new edition with substantially unchanged text.
    4. See MARC field help on OCLC for DtST and for field 260 for additional examples.

Prepublication versions of a work: Author's proof copy; Corrected proof copy; etc.

These are preliminary versions of a published work and as such as of interest because they illustrate the progress of a work from creation to publication. They may be issued without preliminaries, indices, formal title page and other publication information. They may include publisher publicity, promotion plans, etc.

Procedures:

Example: Proof copy. Issued in red wrappers backed in black cloth; printed in black. 148 pages. 31 x 16 cm. Manuscript annotations.

Duplicates: how many records?

Generally use one bibliographic record for exact duplicates even when there are unique aspects to the copies in terms of funds, provenance, and other copy-specific details. Use c.1, c.2, etc. in holding record call numbers. If copy-specific details are especially complicated, or, multiple bibliographic records already exist, generally prefer separate records.

5XX Notes

General order of notes:

Additional examples of local notes:

Donor information or fund information

(Dates may be left out if unknown)


When item has hand-written names, create a 590 note: The following are intended as samples; many forms have been used over the years. Select the pattern that best fits the situation you have.

 

When item is one of a numbered edition, create two notes:


When item is numbered and signed the notes should not be combined:


Note when a book has illustrated wrappers or is in its original dust jacket.

500 Dust jacket. 500 As issued in illustrated wrappers (wrappers contain printed information and/or illustrations) 500 As issued in printed wrappers (wrappers contain printed information only)

Uncut and untrimmed items

 

 


Note such other copy-specific features in 590-notes (include copy numbers when needed):


Accompanying materials: these may be either inserted into or pasted in an item, or, in cases of multiple or sizeable mateirals, kept in an accompanying materials envelope.

Linking to SU collections Curators will indicate when a title is related to a collection or is author of import to SCRC; include information in 590-notes.

Research gift copies (use two 590-notes; no other acknowledgement needed)

 Fund, gift, and citation notes (examples and templates for notes)

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note

Purchased from Charles A. Dana Foundation funds

Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art.

Purchased from funds from Library Associates

Purchased from George Arents fund

Purchased from Marie Little Bird Fund

Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund

Purchased from Sol Feinstone Library Fund.

Purchased from Alonzo Flack Library Endowment Fund

Purchased from Petty Fund

Purchased from Phi Beta Kappa Endowment Fund.

Purchased from Edward A. Smith and Sheridan Gilmore Smith Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from William P. Tolley Endowed Library Fund.

Purchased from Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from Eric W. Lawson Family Endowment for New York State Documentary Heritage

Purchased from Special Collections Research Center Gift Fund.

Purchased from Elizabeth Henes Endowed Fund.

Gift of Marc S. Seigle in memory of Vincent "Ted" D'Amato.

Gift notes:

Gift of Clare and Arnold Kivelson.

Gift of Gary and Mary McDowell.

Gift of Norman Keim.

Gift of David Tatham and Cleota Reed.

Gift of David H. Stam.

Gift of Robert and Virginia Dewey.

Gift of Mary Jane Woodward.

Gift of Luise and Morton Kaish.

From the Library of Earl Browder.

From the library of Michael Aikey.

Gift of Ray Thompson.

Provenance: John S. Mayfield (donor).

Gift of Anthony Tollin.

Gift of Albert and Helen Fowler from the Approach Archives.

Manuscript note template:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for the manuscript collection ...

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for a portion of the manuscript collection ...

Plastics collection notes

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Libraries is the repository for several manuscript, archival, and artifact collections in the history of plastic.

On deposit from the National Plastics Center.

Citation notes

Genre headings (655 field)

Genre headings describe what the item is, not what it is about.

Curators will decide when the genre heading is required; certain projects have genre heading policies. There is no overall policy for their use. If they appear in OCLC records being used, leave them in the record as long as they are relevant

Some genre headings relate to material characteristics, such as:

In-analytics: cataloguing component part(s)

These procedures allow a part or section of a larger work to be catalogued on its own record. Procedures are invoked when an item is of interest, not as an entity, but because of specific content.

Policy In cases where a chapter, short story, or essay within a monograph, or, an article in a periodical issue, is the reason the larger item is in SCRC, that specific content will be catalogued. Examples include Stephen Crane stories published in Harper's or another magazine; feature articles on writers, designers, artists of interest to SCRC.

Procedures

Monographic treatment of periodical or other serial theme issues

Multipart monographs

These are monographs issued in more than one physical piece, in multiple volumes, parts, etc. Some things to watch out for:

Cataloguing monographic sets / multipart monographs

Multiple titles bound in a single physical volume

These procedures cover titles originally published separately and bound together subsequent to publication. Under the best circumstances, they can be easily distinquished from titles issued together by a publisher by individual title pages and other sources of information, such as pagination, running titles, colophon information, etc.

The serials exception: If one or more titles are serials, create a holdings record listing the issues held in the usual way.

Transfers

Occasionally, curators will determine that a title, currently residing in general collections, should be transferred to SCRC because of its age, content, or need for greater protection.

Procedures:

Nearly all these have records on SUMMIT, but the records have SU (general colelctions) rather than the SP (SCRC) owning Library.

Statistics

Refer to the 948 statistics definitions for the full details. The 948 counts transactions, formats, and pieces added or withdrawn and identifies the operator.

The most common transactions add materials to the collections through purchase, gift, and transfer (from general colledtions). All of these have piece counts; most involve print monographs or print serials. New title transactions cover cataloguing a title for the first time. Added volume or copy transactions cover adding pieces to a title already catalogued. New title and adds transactions involve both purchased and gift items.

NOTE: When cataloguing materials whose acquistion details are unknown, consider these as gifts, unless they have paper invoices or order slips in them. Transfers from general collections are identified by having call numbers on spines, barcodes, and propoerty stamps or plates.

When handling titles with SUMMIT records, there is no piece count. These transactions include recataloguing (to correct errors or enhance the record) and reclassification (changing the call number from Dewey to LC, or unclassified to LC. Recataloguing may involve overlaying the existing SUMMIT record with an updated OCLC record and making corrections directly on SUMMIT.

When dealing with items having a card catalogue record, but no SUMMIT, there is no piece count; these are retrospective conversion transactions; whenever SU Library's holdings symbol is added to OCLC, count transaction as a retrospective conversion.

When adding volumes or issues to a serial or multi-volume set, use the add transactions for either gifts or purchased items as appropriate.

Cataloguing workflows

All new titles--gift, purchase, or transfer--go from cataloguing to the Conservation Lab. At this point items are indicated as "In process [date]" in SUMMIT. Books are placed on a truck in the manuscripts workroom and are labeled Catalogued with a date range. When a truck is full, it is taken to the north wall near the Ranke desk.

Conservation staff retrieve trucks from the north wall and take them to the Lab for endprocessing. These routines include: affixing bookplates to items and call number flags to envelopes and other containers and creating mylar covers for items with dust jackets. In addition, items are evaluated and conservation staff treat and rehouse them as necessary, and finally, verify that call numbers on flags are correct.

When finished, staff remove the "in process" status and take trucks to be shelved in the collection.

What this means when searching for books:

Descriptive Cataloging for Rare Materials (DCRM)

Some SCRC materials require more detailed description. DCRM mandates fuller transcription which more closely reflects the specific details of an item, more detailed physical descrptions, and additional notes and other elements. Generally curators decide whether DCRM is required. Upstate New York 19th-century imprints are described using DCRM (books).

Introduction

Descriptive cataloging of rare materials (Books) (DCRM(B)) was published in 2007 and prepared by the Bibliographic Standards committee of the Rare Books and Manuscripts section of the American Library Association. DCRM(B) represents a revision of the 1991 Descriptive cataloging of rare books and expands coverage from hand-press printed books to include machine-made books. In addition sections on series and an expanded appendix on early letter forms and symbols were added.

While the prescribed sources of information remain the same, in the first three areas, if information comes from somewhere other than the title page (even if it is prescribed), make a note. Any information from a non-prescribed source must be bracketed. There is little or no transposition, abridgement or modernization for transcription. If there is an occasion to use transposition (i.e., a author's name is printed before a title, rather than as part of a title), a note is required to explain the transposition. Information for different areas of description can be considered "inseparable". In those cases, provide them in the area that they are connected to (i.e., a statement of responsibility is inseparable from a title), and do not repeat the information in the area to which it would naturally belong. Resources may be used to provide information or direct descriptive elements such as: Descriptive bibliographies can be cited for references. If a descriptive bibliography is being cited, use Standard Citation Forms for Rare Book Cataloging. This is available in Cataloger's Desktop. Dealer's descriptions may be included with new books purchased. These descriptions can include detail on bindings, printings and other descriptive elements.

 

When should DCRM be used?

This will be determined and communicated to catalogers by curators.

Transcribing early letter forms:

Transcribing I V i j u v:

 

245

The basic principle behind DCRB requires complete and accurate transcription of information. This is especially important for the title and statement of responsibility.

Title proper and other title information Transcribe the title proper and other title information as it appears in the item. If a title is very lengthy, a mark of omission may be used, but only after the sixth word and only less important words. Continue the transcription to the end of the chief title of the publication. Non-title elements can be part of the title statement and may appear before title elements. These should be transcribed in the order they appear if they are part of the title. If any part of the title is transposed, provide a note. Generally treat volume information as Other title information.

Statement of responsibility

The statement of responsibility should be transcribed as it appears on the page. This includes information such as titles of nobility, address, honor and distinction that may appear with the names in the statement of responsibility. Omit such things as initials indicating membership to societies or academic degrees if it is possible to do so grammatically, unless they are used for identification or the author is represented only a pseudonym, descriptive phrase or non alphabetic symbols. Use the mark of omission for anything that has been omitted. Noun phrases indicating the role of the person or body named in the statement of responsibility should be transcribed as part of the statement of responsibility. A short phrase may be used in brackets to indicate function. Expansions, explanations or corrections to the statement of responsibility should be made in a note. When more than one author is listed, list all names in the order they appear. If more than three authors are listed, list the first three names, and include [et al.]. Phrases that do not name an individual or corporate body can still be considered a statement of responsibility.

 

250

The edition statement is a critical area of distinction between different copies of the same work. Edition statements should be included whenever they appear in a work, and if known to be erroneous, it should be noted. In addition, if a bookdealer indicates that something is a particular edition, include that information in a note, not in the Edition Area.

 

260

The area of publication is another critical area for identification of an item. Transcribe in full the publication statement as it appears on the work, including all places and publishers. In many cases explanatory information can be provided in brackets (i.e., modern place names). Corrections can also be provided in brackets, with the addition of an explanatory note.

Give publisher's name in its complete form; this form may be the only way to differentiate between editions.

Include ALL printing information

Dates can be very difficult in DCRB. Not only are there many different dates represented on a work, there are many ways to represent a date. In addition, there are two different calendars used in dating early works (Julian and Gregorian).

300

The physical description of items is also an important deviation from AACR2R. In this area, every single leaf is counted despite the pagination statement, including inserted pages, plates, etc. To recreate the item as closely as possible, there are several different aspects to physical description. Some are handled in the 300 field while others are notes that are expressed in the 5XX fields.

Count every leaf. Include in brackets all unnumbered pages or leaves. If the pages are numbered in terms of leaves, use a leaf count put include a note indicating that the leaves are printed on both sides. Note misnumbered pages in a parenthetical statement at the end of |a and include a note explaining the parenthetical statement.

300 ix, [1], 838 p. (i.e. 388 p.) 500 p. 388 misnumbered 838.

Note folded leaves using either (folded) or (some folded) in the pagination statement. Note incomplete copies with a "+" at the last page in the library's copy and a note indicating that the copy is missing pages after that number. Format refers to the size of the paper that the pages were printed on. Four common formats are: folio, quarto, octavo, and duodecimo. These names refer to the number of time a sheet of paper had to be folded to create the leaves of the gatherings. Note the format at the end of the |c. The location of watermarks, the size and shape of the volume or the number of leaves can be used to distinguish the format. 300 |c 18 cm (8vo)

5XX

DCRB makes particular use of the notes area to discuss the elements of a particular item. As seen above, any deviation needs to be included in a note. Other descriptive elements only belong to notes.


Mandatory notes

Source of information is not the chief source of information. Any deviation from a strict transcription of evidence. The presence of errata The presence of wrappers or dust jackets The presence of half-title pages Signature statement if signatures appear in the item.


510 CITATION NOTE

For DCRB cataloging a 510 should always be given if the work is cited in BAL, Bristol, Evans, STC or Wing (see DCBR p. 63). The form should follow the guidelines in Standard Citation Forms.

Other Access points

Illustrators Added entries for illustrators be made on a case-by-case basis by the curator on the curator cataloging slip.

Use both |e Relator term (spelled out, not abbreviated) and |4 Relator code in our 7XX fields. The relator term will describe the relationship between the personal or corporate name and the item (for example, illustrator, engraver, lithographer). The relator code is a three-character code that indicates the relationship of the entry to the item. We will always use ill in the $4 field. See USMARC Code List-Relator Codes-Term Sequence for more information.

 

Printers Added entries for printers will be created on a case-by-case basis. Use appropriate relator terms and codes. (see Illustrator sample above) This decision is made by the curator pre-cataloging.

Bookbinders Added entries for bookbinders will be created on a case by case basis. Use appropriate relator terms and codes. (see bookbinder ticket sample above). This decision is made by the curator pre-cataloging.


See GENRE HEADING info in previous section.

Science fiction monograph procedures

Many titles have SUMMIT records, which should be overlaid as part of this project. The current project began in the summer of 2010.

Bibliographic record framework:


Bibliographic record standards and workflow:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript collection of [name].

NOTE: Use 655 7 Fantasy fiction. ǂ2 gsafd (or another heading if more appropriate).

Science fiction (41 collections)

New York State Printing Collection

SCRC collects multiple editions, printing variants, and copies of books published in upstate New York, defined roughly as extending from Hudson north and from Albany west. To facilitate identification of variants, items will be described in sufficient detail, frequently following DCRM standards. Each printing will have its own bibliographic record. Precise duplicates will be indicated as numbered copies and may have the same bibliographic record. However, details of provenance, etc. may justify separate records. In most cases, edit the OCLC record for the edition tor reflect printing and other issuing details. While we do not generally add entries for publishers, printers, and engravers (unless instructed by the curators), do not delete these entries from OCLC records if they are present.

BACKGROUND: A separate New York collection exists; however, current receipts are not routinely being added here. The exceptions include exact added copies and related items, such as added volumes to serials and sets. If in doubt, catalogue for the main LC collection. In addition, several publishers, such as Joel Munsell of Albany, had been classified using a locally-developed scheme based on place of publication. Due both to space limitations and the desire to streamline procedures, this practice has been discontinued, except in the cases mentioned above.

The checklist below is based on AACR2 and DCRM conventions and are applied for all items published before 1900 and selected items published more recently. Generally use AACR2 for these until DCRM is redrafted to the RDA context. However, if hybrid, or full RDA records are found, do not edit them back to AACR2.

Checklist:

   The words 51,000st-100,000th taken from t.p. verso.
  Vol. 1: xx, 202 p.; v. 2: xiv, 154 p.
         650  0  Printing $z New York (State) $z Solvay $v Specimens.
          752     United States $b New York $d Syracuse. 

Grove Press Procedures

Overview: these will receive standard AACR-2 cataloguing, with the addition of the local notes indicated below. Standard call number guidelines apply: Follow LC except use full author numbers for fiction and not PZ1-PZ4 in use for some authors prior to 1980. Items will remain a separate collection.

Supplemental books (foreign language and other related items)

Balzac Collection Procedures

Background: Rare book dealer William Hobart Royce dedicated himself to collecting, collating, and codifying all Balzac references in any literature. His book collections comprise both Dewey books, catalogued in the 1950s, and items never catalogued. The Dewey cards may be found in a separate Balzac shelflist; items were catalogued to highlight the Balzac connection when this was not immedicately obvious. Virtually none of these items are on SUMMIT. The purpose of this project is to retrospectively convert the Dewey portion of the collection, add our holdings symbol to OCLC, reclassify and integrate the collection into the SCRC's Library of Congress holdings. The collection will remain a virtual one, through the addition of a local note. A second project to catalogue fully the never-before catalogued items will follow.

Preparation:

General considerations:

Cataloguing guidelines:

Literary call numbers:

End processing guidelines:

Statistics: Count each title as one retrospective conversion and one reclassification.

Kamin Dance Collection Procedures

Overview: Martin Kamin was bookseller and publisher in the area of drama and dance. The books, serials, scores, and pamphlets will be catalogued; there may be some ephemeral items best handled as part of the manuscript collection. Many of the items are heavily illustrated; make sure illustrations and plates are accounted for in the physical description and, when appropriate, add name entries for illustrators and photogrpahers. For items published by him, add a name entry for him as publisher. Note items that have his bookseller's label in them.

Titles will receive full-level cataloguing; apply RDA guidelines when updating pre-AACR2 records. Be sure to check institutional records for additional information.

Two 590-notes will be added:

An OCLC constant data record, Kamin, has been created.

Juvenile Literature Procedures

Overview: Juvenile literature will remain a distinct and named collection. It is a finite collection, the majority of titles acquired from Syracuse University's Library School, but with some purchases apparently added later. There is a small subset of items that appear not to be juvenile titles. The will remain with the collection, however. Full-level cataloguing will be used; accept records as they appear whenever possible, removing only incorrect information. You will likely find some dcrbm or dcrb level records. Accept them as is.

Guidelines:

In general, for non-fiction, standard classification practices hold, with books classified according to their subjects. At least one subject heading must be present for non-fiction, usually with free-floating sub-division, Juvenile literature.

For fiction, past practice has varied: juvenile works by authors tend to class under the author numbers, if the author has non-juvenile works in our collections. If not, the juvenile literature number is used. Check Classification Web for the details. Browse call number PZ.

An OCLC constant data record, children's lit, has been created. One 590-note and one genre heading will be created:

SUMMIT:

Serials

Serials in SCRC: enhancements to records.

 

Overview

The basic guideline is to catalogue serials as serials, even if we own only a single issue, or, only 1 issue was ever published. Annual publications--proceedings, directories, reports--are catalogued as serials (there are many DCRB, or, DCRM-B records for annual issues treated as monographs on OCLC). Do not use these records; if we have monographic records for other issues, retrieve them from the stacks and catalogue the run as a serial.

EXCEPTION: If a single issue of a periodical is a theme issue or contains one or two articles of especial interest to SCRC collections, consider cataloguing the theme issue as a monograph, basing the description on the theme title, or cataloguing the individual article(s) as monographic component parts. Always search OCLC before beginning the workform; there are many such examples on OCLC. Checklists for both these treatments may be found among the monograph procedures.

Differences between general collections cataloging and that for SCRC relate primarily to the following:

All records will be converted to A-2 or RDA format; punctuation and other descriptive elements will be updated. Change the fixed field Desc to a or i as appropriate.

Enhancements for SCRC serials fall into broad categories (the curators will add this information):

A primary enhancement focuses on adding names (editors, contributors, authors, artists, etc) to records to more fully relate the title to collections and other SCRC materials. Whenever additional issues are added, more names may be added based on those new issues. Curators will inform catalogers when this is necessary. In order to clarify the relationship of names to the title, cataloguers will add appropriate relator information, using natural language forms ($e) and appropriate AACR2 abbreviations for terms having them:

Both 500-notes mentioning editors and other contributors and added entries (7xx-fields) for those named must be present.

A second class of enhancements encompasses adding local (590) notes to indicate provenance, relationships to other collections, gift status, or funds used for purchase. Copy-specific characteristics, such as autographed or damaged issues are also created for serials. SCRC serial runs are often the result of multiple purchases or represent issues taken from several different collections. The record documents in some detail how the run was put together.

Other notes:

Curators may propose both subject headings and a call number, just as with monographs.

Manuscript collections

MARC records for manuscript collections are generated from the EAD files using MarcEdit. If MarcEdit is not used or is not available, a MARC record may be created by viewing the EAD file in a text editor or XML editor, and manually copying the relevant information from the appropriate EAD elements. Those elements may be identified by the "encodinganalog" attribute which maps to the correct MARC field, for example:

A complete mapping of EAD to MARC elements may be found here.

MARC fields of especial interest to manuscripts include the following.

Languages used (041 and 546 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include the language(s) represented in the collection, both in code and in plain English. For example:

Codes for the 041 data should be the appropriate ISO 639.2 bibliographic codes.

Restrictions (506 and 540 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include a statement of access and usage restrictions. If there are none, use the boilerplate statements as follows:

If there are restrictions, state them clearly and concisely.

Preferred citation (524 field)

Manuscript collection records should always include a preferred citation, for example:

Acquisition information (541 and possibly 590 fields)

Where possible, manuscript collection records should provide the immediate source of acquisition of the material, for example:

If the material was wholly or partially purchased from a fund, also create a 590 note (so it shows up in the brief record), for example:

See 590 fields below for wording for various funds.

Related material (544 field)

If SUL has related material in its holdings (whether manuscript, rare books, or digital), include references to them. Only reference material that is closely related. For example, in the record for the Fulton Lewis Papers:

Or in the record for the Gerrit Smith Papers:

Finding aid information (555 and 856 fields)

Manuscript collection records should always include the 555 and 856 fields. The 555 field is a generic boilerplate statement that a finding aid exists. The 856 field provides a link to the EAD finding aid on the SCRC website. SCRC personnel can provide the URL if necessary, or it can be derived from the file name of the EAD document.

Subject headings (600, 610, 630, 650, 651 fields)

Assign subject headings as appropriate, following usual cataloging practice. Useful LCSH subheadings for certain types of primary source material may be found here http://libguides.mit.edu/content.php?pid=71596.

Genre and form (655 field)

Manuscript collection records should always include at least one genre/form field that describes the type of material in the collection. Use as many 655's as needed to describe the material. Terms should come from the Art and Architecture Thesaurus. Subfield 2 specifies the source. For example:

MFHDS: Monographs and Serials

The MARC format for holdings record includes location, call number, and (for multi-part monographs and serials) volume holdings information.

NOTE: Determination of special placement of material may also depend on the condition of the material and is sometimes made in consultation with the Preservation staff.

How many records?

Generally, for monographs, all SCRC copies are on separate records because of the need to bring out unique provenance, physical and other details for each copy. Occasionally, duplicate copies will share the same bibliographic record, with individual holdings records.

Recording holdings information: The same procedures for recording holdings apply as for general collections.

 

SHELF LIST AND FLAG CREATION

Currently there are macros to aid in the production of shelflist cards and book flags.Shelf lists are created locally at time of cataloging. Shelf list cards will contain: Call number, Author, Title, Publisher name, date, and Catalog ID number. Specific 590 fields may be added to provide information about a specific copy. Flags are created locally at time of cataloging.

 

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note


Add other funds as necessary to complete the list.

 

==SCRC call numbers== Draft, rev. 24o05


Curator input: Occasionally suggest call numbers (for example using folk literature instead of folklore call number for a literary journal).


Determine preferred call number from among several possibilities, e.g., press, author, illustrator.


Fine Press items—use Z239 + Cutter for press + year + workmark for title.

(Note: Z239 has been discontinued by LC)

Z239.1 Australia

Z239.2 England

Z239.3 France

Z239.4 Germany

Z239.5 Italy

Z239.6 Wales


Literary authors—generally use author number for all works, regardless of subject matter, to group them together. (Oates is a prime example, with the added wrinkle of using Cutter Sanborn derived 2nd Cutter for items she wrote, but using LC derived 2nd Cutter for titles edited by or contributed to.)


Illustrators as per established list: class in NC975 using designated sub-system for person. Foreign illustrators as per Janet Shahan’s list.


Children's literature: General guidelines

 

Other situations:

US cartoonists: NC1429

Albert Schweitzer: everything by under CT1098.S41 …

Everything about under CT1098.S411

M. Bourke-White: TR650.B77 …

B. Spock: RJ61.S64 …

PanAm 103: everything under LD5237.7 1988 [Cutter for main entry] [date]

Peace (pamphlets, sermons, lectures, moral and ethical aspects): use JX1963

Call numbers for copies

Call number are used to differentiate between copies. The local practice is to add information after the year to explain the difference. Examples:

Publishers. If books with the same call number have different publishers add the first three letters of the publishers name after the year.

Provenance - It books have a different provenance, add the first three letters of the source name after the call number.

Item records, flags, processing

ITEM RECORDS

SHELF LIST CARDS AND FLAGS

In 2008, it was agreed that shelflist cards would no longer be produced for newly-catalogued titles. At the time the sweep of the LC shelflist began, the decision was made to disaggregate the card shelflist and discard cards as SUMMIT records were verfied and/or retrospective conversion completed.

Cards for books not on the shelves will be retained and searched again. After a year of looking, the title will be declared lost and withdrawn.

Book flags will be created for all monographs and bound serial volumes. Book flags need not be created for unbound periodical issues. If an item requires a flag for identification and shelving, one may be created. Item records will not be created for any unbound issues.

590 fields are added to provide information about a specific copy

Fund Codes to be included in a 590 note

Purchased from Charles A. Dana Foundation funds

Purchased from Peter Graham fund for Radicalism in Literature and Art.

Purchased from funds from Library Associates

Purchased from George Arents fund

Purchased from Marie Little Bird Fund

Purchased from Adah C. Blackman Fund

Purchased from Sol Feinstone Library Fund.

Purchased from Alonzo Flack Library Endowment Fund

Purchased from Petty Fund

Purchased from Phi Beta Kappa Endowment Fund.

Purchased from Edward A. Smith and Sheridan Gilmore Smith Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from William P. Tolley Endowed Library Fund.

Purchased from Memorial Library Fund.

Purchased from Eric W. Lawson Family Endowment for New York State Documentary Heritage

Gift of Marc S. Seigle in memory of Vincent "Ted" D'Amato.

Gift notes:

Gift of Clare and Arnold Kivelson.

Gift of Gary and Mary McDowell.

Gift of Norman Keim.

Gift of David Tatham and Cleota Reed.

Gift of David H. Stam.

Gift of Robert and Virginia Dewey.

Gift of Mary Jane Woodward.

Gift of Luise and Morton Kaish.

From the Library of Earl Browder.

From the library of Michael Aikey.

Gift of Ray Thompson.

Provenance: John S. Mayfield (donor).

Gift of Anthony Tollin.

Gift of Albert and Helen Fowler from the Approach Archives.

Manuscript note template:

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for the manuscript collection ...

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for a portion of the manuscript collection ...

Plastics collection notes

The Special Collections Research Center at Syracuse University Library is the repository for several manuscript, archival, and artifact collections in the history of plastic.

On deposit from the National Plastics Center.

Citation notes

Call numbers

Curator input: Curators may propose call numbers (for example using folk literature instead of folklore call number for a literary journal).

Preferred call numbers may derive from the press, the author, the illustrator, or some other aspect that makes the book of interest to SCRC.

Fine Press items

For US-based presses, use Z239 + Cutter for press + year + workmark for title. Search SUMMIT to see if a press number has been established prior to 2009.

Publisher list:

(Note: Z239 has been discontinued by LC)

Z239.1 Australia

Z239.2 England

Z239.3 France

Z239.4 Germany

Z239.5 Italy

Z239.6 Wales

Literary authors

Generally use author's literary number for all works, regardless of subject matter, to keep all works together.

Illustrators

as per established list: class in NC975 using designated sub-system for person. Foreign illustrators as per Janet Shahan’s list.

Other situations

US cartoonists: NC1429

Albert Schweitzer: everything by under CT1098.S41 …

Everything about under CT1098.S411

M. Bourke-White: TR650.B77 …

B. Spock: RJ61.S64 …

PanAm 103: everything under LD5237.7 1988 [Cutter for main entry] [date]

Call numbers for copies

Call number are used to differentiate between copies. The local practice is to add information after the year to explain the difference.

Examples:

Publishers. If books with the same call number have different publishers add the first three

letters of the publishers name after the year.

Provenance - It books have a different provenance, add the first three letters of the source name after the call number.

THESAURI FOR RARE BOOKS

Binding terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor.

Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Type evidence : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Provenance evidence : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / ‡c Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section.Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Printing and publishing evidence : thesauri for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / ‡c Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Paper terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.

Genre terms : a thesaurus for use in rare book and special collections cataloging / Beth M. Russell, thesaurus editor. Association of College and Research Libraries. Rare Books and Manuscripts Section. Bibliographic Standards Committee.